(WGFTFB). - ICES

Loading...

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008 ICES F ISHERIES T ECHNOLOGY C OMMITTEE ICESCM 2008/FTC:02 R EF . WGECO

Report of the ICES-FAO Working Group on Fish Technology and Fish Behaviour (WGFTFB)

21-25 April 2008 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

 

 

International Council for the Exploration of the Sea  Conseil International pour l’Exploration de la Mer  H. C. Andersens Boulevard 44–46  DK‐1553 Copenhagen V  Denmark  Telephone (+45) 33 38 67 00  Telefax (+45) 33 93 42 15   www.ices.dk  [email protected]  Recommended format for purposes of citation:  ICES. 2008. Report of the ICES‐FAO Working Group on Fish Technology and Fish  Behaviour (WGFTFB), 21‐25 April 2008, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. ICES CM  2008/FTC:02. 265 pp.  For permission to reproduce material from this publication, please apply to the Gen‐ eral Secretary.  The document is a report of an Expert Group under the auspices of the International  Council for the Exploration of the Sea and does not necessarily represent the views of  the Council.  © 2008 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| i

C o n t e n ts Executive summary ................................................................................................................1 1

Directive ..........................................................................................................................4

2

Introduction ....................................................................................................................4

3

2.1

Terms of Reference ...............................................................................................4

2.2

Participants ............................................................................................................6

2.3

Explanatory note on meeting and report structure..........................................6

WGFTFB advice and requests during 2007–2008 .....................................................6 3.1.1 WGEF Request on Outrigger Trawls ....................................................7 3.1.2 EU request on Baltic Cod Selectivity.....................................................9 3.1.3 Request from WGSSDS on selection patterns ....................................12 3.2

Request from ACE on the use of VMS data ....................................................15

3.3

Meeting  of  WGFTFB  Chair  with  EU  Commission  and  Net  manufacturers on technical measures regulations.........................................15

3.4

SGMIXMAN ........................................................................................................17

3.5

AMAWGC ...........................................................................................................17

3.6

SGBYC ..................................................................................................................18

4

ICES draft science plan 2007–2013............................................................................18

5

Report  from  Study  Group  on  the  Development  of  Fish  Pots  for  Commercial Fisheries and Survey Purposes (SGPOT).........................................18

6

Report  from  Working  Group  on  Quantifying  All  Fishing  Mortality  (WGQAF) ......................................................................................................................19

7

FAO request for clarification on Bycatch terminology.........................................20

8

Update on Gear Classification Topic .......................................................................21

9

WWF Smart Gear Competition .................................................................................22

10

ToR a): Species Separation in demersal trawls ......................................................22 10.1 General Overview...............................................................................................22 10.2 Terms of Reference .............................................................................................23 10.3 List of Participants ..............................................................................................23 10.4 Actions .................................................................................................................24 10.5 Timetable for completion of work....................................................................24 10.6 Recommendations ..............................................................................................24 10.6.1 Summary  of  Haddock  Symposium  2007  as  it  relates  to  species separation ..................................................................................25 10.6.2 Can  Yellowtail  Flounder  be  harvested  without  bycatch  of  cod  and  haddock  on  Georges  Bank?  Real‐time  spatial‐ temporal fishing strategies ...................................................................25  

ii |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

10.6.3 UK  trials  with  the  eliminator  trawl  and  a  new  simple  method for catch comparison analysis................................................26 11

ToR b): Advice to Assessment WG’s........................................................................26 11.1 General Overview...............................................................................................26 11.1.1 11.1.2 11.1.3 11.1.4

12

Terms of Reference ................................................................................27 General Issues.........................................................................................27 Information for Individual Assessment Working Groups...............31 Recommendations .................................................................................31

ToR c): Static Gear Selectivity Manual ....................................................................31 12.1 General Overview...............................................................................................31 12.1.1 12.1.2 12.1.3 12.1.4

Terms of Reference ................................................................................31 General Issues.........................................................................................32 List of Participants .................................................................................33 Recommendations .................................................................................33

12.2 Individual Presentation .....................................................................................33 12.2.1 Size  selectivity  of  basket  traps  for  the  gastropod  Nassarius  mutabilis in the Adriatic Sea..................................................................33 13

ToR (d) Mitigation Technologies for Protected Species.......................................35 13.1 General Overview...............................................................................................35 13.1.1 13.1.2 13.1.3 13.1.4 13.1.5 13.1.6

Terms of Reference ................................................................................35 Identification of technical mitigation measures.................................35 Assessment of efficacy of the technical measures .............................36 List of Participants .................................................................................37 Conclusions ............................................................................................37 Recommendations .................................................................................37

13.2 Individual Presentations....................................................................................38 13.2.1 Turtle  Excluder  Devices  Experiments  in  the  Central  Adriatic Sea.............................................................................................38 14

ToR e): Request form WGEF......................................................................................39

15

ToR f): Ad hoc Topic Group on Shrimp Trawl Efficiency ...................................39 15.1 Request.................................................................................................................39 15.2 Shrimp Trawl Evolution ....................................................................................40 15.3 General Comments .............................................................................................41 15.4 Icelandic Effort Data...........................................................................................41 15.5 Catch Quality versus Catch Rate ......................................................................43 15.6 List of Participants ..............................................................................................44 15.7 Conclusions .........................................................................................................44 15.8 Recommendations ..............................................................................................44

16

ToR g): WGECO request as part of the OSPAR QSR 2010 ..................................45 16.1 General Overview...............................................................................................45

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

16.1.1 16.1.2 16.1.3 16.1.4 17

| iii

Terms of Reference ................................................................................45 General Issues.........................................................................................46 Conclusions ............................................................................................47 Recommendations .................................................................................48

FAO  Reduction  of  Bycatch  in  Tropical  Shrimp  Trawling  (REBYC)  project ............................................................................................................................49 17.1 Overview..............................................................................................................49 17.2 National Report Summaries..............................................................................49 17.2.1 Philippines ..............................................................................................49 17.2.2 Southeast Asia ........................................................................................50 17.2.3 Indonesia.................................................................................................51 17.2.4 Iran...........................................................................................................51 17.2.5 Bahrain ....................................................................................................52 17.2.6 Cuba.........................................................................................................52 17.2.7 Trinidad and Tobago.............................................................................53 17.2.8 Venezula..................................................................................................53 17.2.9 Mexico .....................................................................................................54 17.2.10 Columbia ..........................................................................................54 17.2.11 Costa Rica .........................................................................................55 17.2.12 Nigeria ..............................................................................................56 17.2.13 Cameroon .........................................................................................56 17.3 List of Participants ..............................................................................................57 17.4 Conclusions .........................................................................................................57

18

Summary of Other Presentations..............................................................................58 18.1 Nordic Project; Research in big mesh pelagic trawls.....................................58 18.2 Direct  observations  of  large  mesh  capelin  trawls;  evaluation  of  mesh escapement and gear efficiency..............................................................58 18.3 Design  and  test  of  a  topless  shrimp  trawl  to  reduce  pelagic  fish  bycatch in the Gulf of Maine pink shrimp fishery .........................................59 18.4 FISHSELECT  ‐  a  tool  for  predicting  basic  selective  properties  for  netting ..................................................................................................................60 18.5 Technical and selective properties of T90 meshes codend‐extension  tandems made of different netting stiffness....................................................61 18.6 Fuel Saving Initiatives in the French Fishing Industry..................................61 18.7 Modelling  flow  through  and  around  nets  using  computational  fluid dynamics ....................................................................................................62 18.8 Comparison  of  selective  properties  for  nettings  when  used  in  normal direction versus in 90 degrees turned direction (Poster).................62 18.9 Simulation‐based  study  of  precision  and  accuracy  for  methods  to  assess size selective properties of codends (Poster).......................................63

19

National Reports ..........................................................................................................65 19.1 Belgium ................................................................................................................65 19.2 Canada .................................................................................................................67  

iv |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

19.3 Denmark ..............................................................................................................69 19.4 Faroe Islands........................................................................................................69 19.5 France  ..................................................................................................................71 19.6 Germany ..............................................................................................................74 19.7 Iceland ..................................................................................................................79 19.8 Ireland ..................................................................................................................81 19.9 Netherlands .........................................................................................................84 19.10 Norway ................................................................................................................86 19.11 Spain  ..................................................................................................................90 19.12 Scotland................................................................................................................94 19.13 USA  20

..................................................................................................................99

New Business .............................................................................................................108 20.1 Date and Venue for 2009 WGFTFB Meeting.................................................108 20.2 Proposals for 2009/2010 ASC – Theme Sessions ...........................................108 20.3 ICES and other Symposia ................................................................................109 20.4 Any Other Business ..........................................................................................109

Annex 1: List of participants.............................................................................................110 Annex 2: Agenda.................................................................................................................115 Annex 3: Recommendations .............................................................................................117 Annex 4: WGFTFB terms of reference for the next meeting.......................................119 Annex 5: Study Groups .....................................................................................................124 Annex 6: Proposed Term of Reference JFTAB ..............................................................126 Annex 7: Outline of CRR Report on Species Separation ............................................128 Annex  8:  WGFTFB  Information  for  other  ICES  Expert  Groups  –  Questionnaire sent to WGFTFB members ............................................................131 Annex 9: Compendium of Mitigation Technologies ...................................................160 Annex  10:  Loggerhead  Turtle  (Caretta  caretta)  bycatch,  case  study:  Mediterranean Sea.....................................................................................................171 Annex 11: WGECO request as part of the OSPAR QSR 2010 ....................................180 Annex  12:  Reports  from  National  Coordinators  of  the  FAO  Project   (REBYC 1) ....................................................................................................................201        

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 1

Executive summary The  ICES‐FAO  Working  Group  on  Fish  Technology  and  Fish  Behaviour  (WGFTFB)  met in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands from 21–25 April 2008 to address seven Terms of Ref‐ erence. The main outcomes related to the ToRs are detailed below.  Key Findings Species separation in demersal trawls (Section 10)



A  summary  of  the  status  of  knowledge  and  future  directions  in  research  and  application  on  the  behaviour  and  species  separation  in  commercial  species  would  greatly  benefit  FTFB  members  and  the  fishing  industry.  A  WGFTFB  topic  group  will  continue  to  concentrate  on  behaviour and  spe‐ cies separation of commercial demersal species in bottom trawls. 



WGFTFB  therefore  recommends  the  publication  of  an  ICES  Cooperative  Research  Report  on  Species  Separation  based  on  the  work  carried  out  by  the Topic Group. A timetable and structure for this CRR report have been  agreed. 

Advice to Assessment Working Groups (Section11)



The overall picture from the questionnaires in 2008 is quite negative. Due  to a combination of soaring fuel prices, reduced quotas, decreasing fishing  opportunities  and  volatile  prices  for  several  key  species  notably  nephrops,  haddock, cod, monkfish and hake, there is a general air of despondency in  the fleets across Europe.  



There seems to be a general trend of effort reduction across fleets and also  widespread  evidence  of  fishermen  in  many  countries  reverting  to  more  fuel efficient methods in an attempt to reduce operating costs and maintain  economic viability.  



The effects of technological creep are still evident in many fisheries but the  concept of negative creep reported in 2006 and 2007 is now becoming more  prevalent  as  vessels  try  to  reduce  operating  costs  to  counteract  high  fuel  prices.  Most  technological  creep  observed  has  concentrated  on  reducing  the drag of fishing gear. 



In  a  number  of  fisheries,  there  is  some  evidence  of  voluntary  uptake  of  gear mitigation measures. The drivers for uptake are either regulatory i.e.  as  a  means  of  achieving  increased  fishing  opportunities  or  economic  through improved fish quality. There has also been evidence of some ves‐ sels adopting more selective gear as a way of improving public perception. 



Evidence  of  discarding  has  been  observed  in  a  number  of  fisheries  2007/2008.  The  motivations  for  discarding  are  a  mixture  of  regulatory  or  economically driven. Specific examples include cod in Area VIIb‐k and in  the Baltic Sea. 



Ghost fishing in the deepwater fisheries in Areas IV, VI and VII remains a  problem.  There  are  reports  of  discarded  longlines  and  gill  nets  along  the  Scottish west coast deep water grounds and in the northern North Sea and  predation of fish catches by Grey seals from gillnet/tangle net fisheries has  become an increasing problem on the south coast of Ireland.  

 

2 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



As has become the trend in recent years there are very few reports of new  fisheries being developed but a few specific examples are reported such as  sea cucumber in Iceland and squid in the Moray Firth and at Rockall. 

Gillnet Selectivity Manual (Section 12)



The  original  ICES  draft  static  gear  selectivity  manual  was  felt  to  be  80%  complete and on the basis of the information available it was agreed that it  was a worthwhile exercise to complete the manual. It was felt pertinent to  restrict the manual to static nets only i.e. gillnets, trammel nets and tangle  nets.  



A  timetable  for  completion  of  the  manual  was  agreed  with  a  completion  date  of  mid‐2009.  Subject  to  technical  review,  the  manual  will  be  consid‐ ered  as  a  joint  ICES/FAO  publication.  No  financial  commitment  has  been  made at this stage. 

Mitigation Measures for Protected Species (Section 13)



WGFTFB acknowledges the work carried out by ICES SGBYC in develop‐ ing the table of mitigation measures and has sought to update this table. 



WGFTFB concludes that the impact of fisheries on Loggerhead turtle needs  to be considered urgently given the scale of the problem. Research into the  applicability  of  proven  mitigation  technologies  to  reduce  the  bycatch  should be supported. 



WGFTFB has been unable to use the methodology developed in 2008 to as‐ sess  the  efficacy  of  mitigation  measures  for  protected  species.  WGFTFB  conclude that this methodology is data dependent and for most protected  species with bycatch issues such data does not exist currently. 

Advice to WGEF on outrigger trawls (Section14)



WGFTFB concluded that Belgian and UK trials suggest the use of outrigger  trawls may lead to an increase in the catch of rays, particularly when ves‐ sels  specifically  target  this  species.  Some  technical  limitations  with  this  gear  for  larger  vessels  relating  to  gear  spread  have  been  highlighted.  In  practice this means, at least in the short term, that the uptake for this gear  will be limited to smaller vessels in Belgium and the impact on ray stocks  maybe  not  that  significant  although  this  needs  monitoring.  This  may  not  necessarily  be  the  case  in  the  UK,  where  indications  are  that  large  beam  trawl vessels may adopt this gear, due to fuel costs. 

Advice to NIPAG & STACREC on shrimp trawl efficiency (Section15)

 



WGFTFB concludes that due to the catching process for shrimp, horizontal  opening is more important than filtered volume with respect to catch vol‐ umes and this is reflected in the current trends in shrimp trawl design. 



WGFTFB concludes that due to the fundamental differences in the catching  process, comparisons between single and twin trawls for fish species and  shrimp are not relevant. This is because herding efficiency by sweeps can  very much influence capture efficiency for fish but not for shrimp. 



WGFTFB  can  find  no  reliable  estimates  of  single  vs.  twin  trawl  efficiency  based on horizontal spread. Icelandic effort data using trawl circumference  shows average catch rates for twin trawls of between 1.25–2.24 times that  of a single trawl, with an average of 1.66.  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



| 3

WGFTFB  can  find  no  evidence  of  multiple  rigs  being  used  to  improve  catch  quality.  The  main  tool  used  that  does  improve  catch  quality  is  the  Nordmore  sorting  grid.  There  is  evidence,  however,  of  fishermen  using  twin  or  trouser  codends  to  reduce  the  risk  of  gear damage,  increase  win‐ gend spread and improve catch quality. 

WGECO request as part of the OSPAR QSR 2010 (Section 16)



The  integration  of  fishing  gear  technology  research  in  the  framework  for  fisheries  management  is  a  prerequisite  for  achieving  an  ecosystem‐based  approach. It is recommended that many of the issues evolving from the se‐ lected case studies outlined by WGFTFB should be taken into account in a  framework  for  assessing  impacts  and  management  measures  related  to  fishing gear based technical measures. 



The efficacy of gear based technical measures is currently infrequently as‐ sessed. In this respect WGFTFB conclude that the protocol used in the UK  study to evaluate the legislation put into force for the C. crangon fisheries is  both holistic and effective. The same protocol can potentially be used else‐ where  in  other  fisheries  to  conduct  similar  evaluations  on  the  efficacy  of  gear based technical measures.  



While  focus  on  a  more  ecosystem‐based  approach  is  emerging  gradually,  little  fishing  gear  research  is  directed  towards  other  ecosystem  compo‐ nents. Therefore there is need to consider biological and ecological impacts  of gear configurations and modifications during the research phase and be‐ fore inception into legislation.  



Research  on  gear  modifications  to  improve  selectivity  of  commercial  fish  species through a variety of sorting devices has been proven to reduce by‐ catch  and  discards  rates,  mainly  of  fish  species  (Valdemarsen  and  Suu‐ ronen,  2003,  Suuronen  and  Sarda,  2008).  The  application  of  these  gear  modifications  can  be  achieved  through  regulations  or  sometimes  through  voluntary  use  by  fishermen.  Regulatory  and  market  incentives  can  both  lead to an improvement of fishing practice. 



From the case studies, it can be seen that communication and education are  vitally  important  when  introducing  gear  based  measure  into  legislation.  Regulations  are  sometimes  introduced  quickly,  but  it  takes  time  for  the  fishing industry to adapt.  



When  framing  legislation,  there  is  a  need  to  consider  all  relevant  issues  (e.g. practicalities, socio‐economic and technical aspects, etc.) to ensure that  gear measures, proven effective in fishing gear research, meet their objec‐ tives after implementation. 



Non‐regulatory  uptake  of  technical  gear  measures  can  be  achieved  through various incentives. These incentives can be market‐driven, but in‐ dustry  may  also  be  motivated  by  uptake  which  has  the  potential  to  im‐ prove the public perception of fishing.  

FAO Reduction of Environmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling (REBYC 1)



In 2008, REBYC I will come to an end. Significant progress has been made  towards reducing the bycatch of large charismatic species such as marine  turtles  captured  by  tropical  shrimp  trawls,  however,  significant  problems  remain  with  respect  to  the  capture  of  juvenile  fish  and  sustainable  man‐ agement of tropical mixed species bottom trawl fisheries.   

4 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



1

It is hoped that a second phase project will be implemented and broadened  to  a  greater  number  of  countries  and  incorporating  a  broader  range  of  management tools to manage multi species trawl fisheries. 

Directive The directive of the WGFTFB is to initiate and review investigations of scientists and  technologists concerned with all aspects of the design, planning and testing of fishing  gears used in abundance estimation, selective fishing gears used in bycatch and dis‐ card  reduction;  and  environmentally  benign  fishing  gears  and  methods  used  to  re‐ duce impact on  bottom  habitats and  other  non‐target  ecosystem  components. Areas  of focus should also include behavioural, statistical and capture topics.  The  Working  Groupʹs  activities  shall  focus  on  all  measurements  and  observations  pertaining  to  both  scientific  and  commercial  fishing  gears,  design  and  statistical  methods and operations including benthic impacts, vessels and behaviour of fish in  relation  to  fishing  operations.  The  Working  Group  shall  provide  advice  on  applica‐ tion of these techniques to aquatic ecologists, assessment biologists, fishery managers  and industry. 

2

Introduction Chair:                 Rapporteur:                 Venue:   Date:  

2.1

Dominic Rihan,   Bord Iascaigh Mhara,   PO Box 12  Crofton Road  Dun Laoghaire   Co. Dublin  Ireland  mailto:[email protected]  Huseyin Ozbilgin  Mersin University,   Fisheries Faculty,  Yenisehir Campus,  Mersin, 33169  Turkey  mailto:[email protected]  Tórshavn, Faroe Islands  21–25 April 2008 

Terms of Reference The  ICES–FAO  Working  Group  on  Fishing  Technology  and  Fish  Behaviour  [WGFTFB]  (Chair:  Dominic  Rihan,  Ireland)  will  meet  from  21–25  April  2008 in  Tór‐ shavn, Faroe Islands.  Topics a ) The Topic Group on “Application of fish behaviour for species separa‐

tion in demersal fish trawls” will continue to work by correspondence  following an agreed Action Plan timetable and report to the WGFTFB  in 2008 to:

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Identify  recent  behavioural  and  gear  research  into  the  separation  of  groundfish species in demersal trawl gears; 



Identify  basic  principles,  strategies  and  effectiveness  of  groundfish  species separation techniques such as separator panels, grids and foot‐ rope modifications.

| 5

Conveners: Pingguo He, (USA) and Mike Pol (USA) b ) Term  of  Reference  on  “Incorporation  of  Fishing  Technology  Is‐ sues/Expertise into Management Advice.”  Based on the questionnaire exercise carried out in 2005/06 and 2006/07 into develop‐ ments in fleet dynamics etc, WGFTFB recommends that the topic group continue to  carry  out  this  survey  on an  annual  basis,  taking account  recommendations  received  from WGSSDS.   Conveners: Dave Reid, FRS, Scotland, Norman Graham, MI, Ireland, Dominic Rihan, BIM,  Ireland c ) A WGFTFB topic group of experts will be formed to consider the draft  ICES Static Gear Manual.   The group will have the following ToRs:  •

Review the current draft of the Static Gear Manual; 



Review  available  literature  on  the  measurement  of  selectivity  of  all  Static Gears and identify gaps in the knowledge; and 



Agree  a  structure  for  the  completion  of  the  manual  and  identify  a  drafting committee to complete this task. 

Conveners: Andy Revill, CEFAS, UK and Rene Holst, DIFRES, Denmark  d ) A  WGFTFB  topic  group  of  experts  will  be  formed  with  the  following  ToRs:   •

Identify  fisheries  where  technical  mitigation  measures  have  been  in‐ troduced to reduce the bycatch of protected species; and 



Review the efficacy of these technical mitigation measures introduced  to  reduce  the  bycatch  of  protected  species  such  as  small  cetaceans  or  turtles.  

Conveners:  Alessandro  Lucchetti,  ISMAR‐CNR,  Italy,  Antonello  Sala,  ISMAR‐CNR,  Italy  and Dominic Rihan, BIM, Ireland.  e ) A WGFTFB topic group of experts will work by correspondence to ad‐ dress the following ToR from WGEF:   •

Provide more details on the bycatch of rays in outrigger trawls and  



Review temporal changes in the fishing patterns of high seas pelagic fish‐ eries taking pelagic sharks.   f )  A  WGFTFB  ad  hoc  group  will  work  by  correspondence  and  meet  at  WGFTFB meeting in April 2008 to address the following Tor’s received  from NIPAG & STACREC:   •

To  determine  whether  twin  shrimp  trawls  (e.g.  number  of  meshes  in  circumference) are different from single trawls. This would include in‐ vestigations  of  the  use  of  twin  and  triple  trawls  in  other  fisheries  as 

 

6 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

well, for example Greenland halibut directed fisheries, where their de‐ ployment may be used to improve catch rate rather than catch quality.  •

To study the efficiency of twin trawls and determine how best to rep‐ resent the effort of these trawls for management purposes.

g ) A  WGFTFB  topic  group  of  experts  will  be  formed  to  address  the  fol‐ lowing  ToR  received  from  WGECO  as  part  of  the  OSPAR  Quality  Status Report 2010:  •

For each OSPAR region, select and succinctly describe one or more repre‐ sentative examples of gear modifications, which have resulted in changes  to the ecosystem effects of these gears, including if possible a range of eco‐ system components. 

Conveners: Jochen Depestele, ILVO, Belgium  2.2

Participants A full list of participants is given in Annex 1. 

2.3

Explanatory note on meeting and report structure The approach adopted in 2004 of addressing specific TOR’s was adopted for the 2008  meeting. Individual conveners were appointed during 2007 to oversee and facilitate  work by correspondence throughout the year. The Chair asked the convener of each  ToR to prepare a working document, reviewing the current state of the art, summa‐ rising  the  principal  findings,  identifying  gaps  in  the  knowledge  where  consultation  with other experts was required and recommending future research needs.  Two  days  were  allocated  for  the  conveners  and  members  of  the  individual  Topic  Groups to meet, finalise their reports and findings, and produce a presentation to the  WG and prepare a final report for inclusion in the FTFB report. The summaries and  recommendations  for  the  working  documents  for  each  ToR  were  reviewed  by  WGFTFB and were accepted, rejected or modified accordingly to reflect the views of  the WGFTFB. However, the contents of these working documents do not necessarily  reflect the opinion of the WGFTFB. In addition to the presentation of the review re‐ port,  where  appropriate,  each  convener  was  asked  to  select  a  small  number  (~3)  of  individual  presentations  based  on  specific  research  programmes.  The  abstracts  are  included  in  this  report,  together  with  the  authors’  names  and  affiliations.  Although  discussion relating to the individual presentations was encouraged and some of the  comments  are  included  in  the  text  of  this  report,  the  contents  of  the  individual  ab‐ stracts were NOT discussed fully by the group, and as such they do not necessarily  reflect the views of the WGFTFB.  The chair outlined that were possible this format will be adopted for the foreseeable  future. The agenda for the 2008 is as presented in Annex 2. 

3

WGFTFB advice and requests during 2007–2008 Overview  During 2007/2008, WGFTFB dealt with the following requests for advice: 

 



Request from WGEF 



EU request on Baltic Cod Selectivity 



Request from WGSSDS on selection patterns 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 7



Request from ACE on VMS data usage and buffer zones 



 



EU meeting with net manufacturers 



SGMIXMAN 



AMAWGC 



TOR from SGBYC 

3.1.1

WGEF Request on Outrigger Trawls

WGFTFB  received a  request  from  WGEF  to  consider  the  following  “provide more  de‐ tails on the bycatch of rays in outrigger trawls”.  Vanderperren (2008) reports the results from a study carried out in Belgium aimed at  testing  the  use  of  outrigger  trawls  in  different  areas  as  an  alternative  to  traditional  beam  trawls.  Outrigger  trawling  as  a  fishing  method  replaces  the  two  heavy  steel  beams  on  each  side  normally  towed  by  beam  trawlers  with  two  lighter  demersal  trawls each with its own set of trawl doors. The main benefit is the reduced drag of  the lighter gear resulting in a reduction in fuel consumption. Other likely benefits are  reduced  benthic  impact,  improved  fish  quality,  diversification  into  non  pressure  stock species and increased profitability.   This  study  details  the  catches  of  three  Belgian  beam  trawlers  and  one  Eurocutter,  ranging in sizes from 24m‐35m LOA and 300hp‐1200hp mainly fishing in ICES Areas  VIIf, VIIg and IVc, but also in IVb, VIa, VIIa, VIIb, VIId, VIIe and VIIh over the period  Q2  2006  to  Q2  2007.  Mean  catch  efficiency  for  the  four  vessels  expressed  as  kg  fish/fishing  hour  are  reported  and  catches  of  ray  species  are  found  to  range  from  12.58kg  –  25.96kg  (average  19.34kg)  for  the  four  vessels  (See  Table  1).  In  terms  of  overall  catch  composition  ray  represented  between  32.35%‐45.07%  (average  36.65%)  of the total catch by weight for the four vessels (See Table 2). The results show ray to  be the most important target species based on weight. No breakdown by ray species  is given and no discard data for ray are available at this time, although it is likely the  majority of the catch is marketable fish. For one of the trials vessels (35m/1200p) the  catch composition by ICES area is reported as shown in Table 3.  Table 1. Catch efficiency by species and vessel (marketable catch only).  Catch efficiency (kg/fish/fishing hour)

Species 

Vessel 1 

Vessel 2 

Vessel 3 

Vessel 4 

Ray sp 

12.6 

23.5 

15.4 

26 

Dogfish 

2.7 

3.2 

3.4 

3.7 

 Plaice 

6.1 

5.8 

6.7 

11.2 

Sole 

3.2 



5.2 

6.5 

Lemon Sole 

2.1 

0.5 

1.3 

1.2 

Anglerfish 

1.1 

0.1 

1.4 

1.8 

Other Species 

10.5 

11.5 

14.6 

21.2 

 

8 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Table 2. Catch composition by vessel.  Catch composition (%)

Species 

Vessel 1 

Vessel 2 

Vessel 3 

Vessel 4 

Ray sp 

32.9% 

45.1% 

32.4% 

36.3% 

Dogfish 

7.1% 

6.1% 

7.2% 

5.2% 

Plaice 

15.9% 

11.9% 

14% 

15.6% 

Sole 

8.2% 

13.4% 

11% 

9.1% 

Lemon Sole 

5.6% 

1% 

2.6% 

1.7% 

Anglerfish 

2.9% 

0.2% 

3% 

2.5% 

Other Species 

27.4% 

22.2% 

29.8% 

29.6 

Table 3. Catch composition by ICES Area for one outrigger vessel (35m/1200hp).  Catch Composition (%)

Species 

IVb 

IVc 

VIIa 

VIIb 

VIId 

VIIe 

VIIf 

VIIg 

VIIJ 

Total 

Ray sp. 

0% 

13.6% 

37.8% 

29.8% 

59.7% 

0% 

50.2% 

45% 

0% 

36.3% 

Plaice 

44.5% 

6% 

20.8% 

0% 

3.2% 

32.3% 

14% 

6.7% 

0% 

15.6% 

Sole 

1.1% 

22% 

16.9% 

0% 

3.1% 

8.4% 

13.5% 

7.5% 

0% 

9.1% 

Norway  Lobster 

38.6% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0.3% 

0% 

6.2% 

Dogfish 

0% 

12% 

4.2% 

3.9% 

0.7% 

13.1% 

1.3% 

7.7% 

20.7% 

5.2% 

Anglerfish 

0% 

0.1% 

3.3% 

17% 

0% 

1.4% 

0.4% 

3.8% 

32.6% 

2.5% 

Lemon  Sole 

0.1% 

1.5% 

0.3% 

14.9% 

0.3% 

0.7% 

1.3% 

2.6% 

10.9% 

1.7% 

Turbot 

2.8% 

1.7% 

1.7% 

0% 

0.5% 

0.3% 

1.4% 

1.2% 

0% 

1.4% 

Others 

12.9% 

43.1% 

15% 

34.4% 

32.5% 

43.8% 

18.9% 

25.2% 

35.8% 

22% 

Based  on  these  catches,  ray  appear  to  be  the  most  important  species  by  weight  in  ICES Areas VIId (59.7%) and VIIf (50.2%) but are also the dominant species in ICES  Areas VIIa, VIIb and VIIg. No rays were caught in Areas IVb and VIIe or VIIj. Taking  catch by different quarter for the same vessel over the period Q4 2006 – Q3 2007, ray  are  the  dominant  species  forming  36.1%,  25.7%,  35.6%  and  41.1%  of  the  total  catch  composition respectively.   A short trial carried out by Seafish in the UK, carried out in the south west of England  to  investigate  the  effectiveness  of  outrigger  trawls  in  lowering  fuel  costs,  and  indi‐ cated similar results with ray forming a high proportion of the overall catch composi‐ tion. This trial also indicated a reduction of discarding with the outrigger trawl. Total  discards from single basket samples taken for each of the nine hauls carried out dur‐ ing  the  trial amounted  to  an  average  of  59%  by  volume,  compared  with  71% meas‐ ured  from  beam  trawlers  from  comparable  surveys  (Cornwall  Fisheries  Resource  Centre, 2007).   The  Dutch  fishing  industry  has  conducted  experimental  trials  with  outrigger  trawls  from February till October 2006 to investigate the possibilities for lowering fuel costs.  Four beam trawlers (1350hp – 2000hp) have conducted experiments in the North Sea.  The Dutch outriggers are, in contrast with Belgian and UK vessels, specifically target‐ ing plaice and/or Norway lobster, in all quarters except for the winter period. Catches  of Norway lobster are 4 to 5 times higher than catches of beam trawlers. More valu‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 9

able  fish  species,  such  as  sole,  brill  and  turbot  are  only  caught  in  small  quantities  compared to beam trawlers, but the catches of plaice are comparable (Bult & Schelvis‐ Smit, 2007). No data are provided, however, on ray species.  There are a number of potential reasons for the increased ray catch with the outrigger  trawl, which relate to changes in fishing behaviour or differences in the dynamics of  the outrigger trawl gear as follows:   1 ) The outrigger trawl is not as effective at catching sole and there is evidence  that  Belgian  and  UK  fishermen  have  specifically  targeted  rays  using  out‐ rigger  trawls  to  compensate  for  the  decrease  in  sole  catch.  In  the  beam  trawl fishery rays were always considered a bycatch species. There are no  indications that Dutch fishermen compensate their reduced catch of valu‐ able species by higher ray catches.  2 ) Vessels involved in this trial regardless of horsepower have been allowed  to  fish  inside  the  12  mile  and  in  certain  areas  this  may  lead  to  high  ray  catches (Polet et al., 2007) given there are known to be local populations in‐ side 12 miles e.g. Irish Sea.   3 ) The main difference in the outrigger gear and beam trawls is the reduced  weight and reduced fishing speed, giving rise to a substantial fuel saving,  and the increase in spread. In the Seafish trials gear monitoring equipment  installed on the gear recorded from 7–9m of spread between the doors per  side,  with  a  relatively small  net,  whereas  vessels  would  be  restricted  to  a  4m  beam  fishing  the  same  area  inside  the  12  mile  limit.  This  increased  spread  and  ground  coverage  is likely  to  improve  catch  efficiency  for spe‐ cies such as ray.  4 ) An  abundance  of  larger  rays  observed  in  the  outrigger  catches  compared  with  beam  trawls  may  be  a  result  of  the  differences  in  groundgears  be‐ tween the beam trawl and outrigger trawl (Richard Caslake, pers. comm.).  In conclusion the Belgian and UK trials suggest the use of outrigger trawls may lead  to an increase in the catch of rays, particularly when vessels specifically target these  species. However, it should be stressed that the results also suggest that the use of the  outrigger  trawl  is  an  economically  viable  option  for  smaller  vessels  (e.g.  Eurocutter  vessel) fishery, while for larger vessels viability due to reduced sole catches is at best  marginal.  Polet  et  al.  (2007)  and  Vandeperren  (2008)  also  highlight  some  technical  limitations  with  this  gear  for  larger  vessels  relating  to  gear  spread.  In  practice  this  means,  at  least  in  the  short  term,  the  uptake  for  this  gear  will  be  limited  to  smaller  vessels in Belgium and the impact on ray stocks maybe not that significant although  needs monitoring. This may not necessarily be the case in the UK, where indications  are that large beam trawl vessels may adopt this gear, due to fuel costs.  3.1.2

EU request on Baltic Cod Selectivity

The  technical  measures  regulation  for  the  Baltic Sea  (EC  No  2187/2005)  requires  the  European Commission to present an evaluation of the selectivity of active gears tar‐ geting cod in the Baltic Sea in 2007. The Commission has requested that ICES advise  on this issue as follows:  “ICES is requested to evaluate the selectivity of active gears on cod for which cod is recognised  as the target species. Those gears are: Trawls, Danish seines and similar gear with a mesh size  ≥105mm with either a Bacoma exit window or a T90 codend as defined in regulation (EC) No  2187/2005. 

 

10 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

The evaluation should include a comparison of the T90 codend and the Bacoma exit  windows concerning their selectivity for cod:  a ) In general;  b ) With regards to the minimum landing size of 38cm;  c ) The rate of discarding;  d ) Any additional aspect that ICES may consider desirable in this context.  ICES is specifically requested to advise on the acceptance of the existing gear specifications by  the industry and whether they conform to the existing obligations and measures for cod man‐ agement in the Baltic”.  The ICES WGFTFB has addressed this request by soliciting input from a number of  specific experts with information and/or comments received from Denmark, Sweden,  Poland, Germany, Finland, Latvia and Ireland (former Chair of WGFTFB). The Chair  of WGFTFB has taken this information and produced a response as an attempt at ad‐ dressing the EU’s specific request.  Based on the information received WGFTFB concluded the following:  3.1.2.1 General Comments



On the basis of an earlier meta‐analysis carried out by ICES, both Bacoma  windows  and  T90  codends  (provided  they  are  correctly  used  as  per  the  current  regulations)  give  50%  retention  lengths  of  38–40cm,  equivalent  to  the MLS for cod of 38cm. There is inherent variability in the data sets used  in this analysis, however, and this should be borne in mind. 



In order to make a direct comparison between the gear options, data from  structured experiments, specifically designed to assess the relative selectiv‐ ity of the two designs is still required. In particular robust data on the ef‐ fect  of  twine  thickness,  codend  circumference  and  mesh  size  needs  to  be  collected given the inherent effect of such parameters on the selectivity of  the respective gear options. 



A preliminary analysis of new data provided by Poland and Germany give  similar L50s of ~ 41cm and Selection Ranges of between 4.8–6.5cm and re‐ affirm the selective properties of T90 codends. 



A  modelling  analysis  carried  out  in  Denmark  indicates  that  codend  cir‐ cumference  has  a  major  bearing  on  selectivity  regardless  of  whether  the  codend is constructed in standard diamond mesh or T90. 



Only limited additional information on the selectivity of Bacoma windows  is  available  and  the  results  of  the  earlier  meta‐analysis  are  considered  as  the most reliable estimates. 

3.1.2.2 Selectivity with Regard to Minimum Landing Size of 38cm

 



Both gear options give L50s equivalent to the MLS for cod but based on the  available  information  the  likelihood  of  either  gear  fully  corresponding  to  the  management  aim  of  bringing  the  MLS  into  agreement  with  L25  in  all  areas of the Baltic is still unclear. This is due, in part to the high degree of  data variability and other factors such as catch size and catch composition. 



Complimentary  technical  measures  such  as  real‐time  closures  maybe  ap‐ propriate in areas where high concentrations of cod are encountered or re‐ stricted  fishing  in  areas  where  flatfish  catches  are  high  and  the  effectiveness of the gear measures maybe negated. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 11

3.1.2.3 The Rate of Discarding



Unless  coverage  by  observer  schemes  is  extensive  compared  to  overall  fishing effort, it is very doubtful that the available discard data will be suf‐ ficient  to  allow  detection  of  gear‐specific  differences  in  discard  rates.  De‐ tection of any differences will be exacerbated by localised differences (i.e.  different fleets using T90 or Bacoma in different areas, fishing on different  size distributions and catch compositions). 



The limited information available from recent research cruises and discard  sampling data indicates similar discard rates of 5–10% for both gear alter‐ natives. 



The  effect  on  selectivity  of  large  catch  sizes  and  differing  catch  composi‐ tions  with  both  gear  options  needs  to  be  considered,  as  there  is  evidence  that both are contributing factors to high discard rates. 

3.1.2.4 Additional Aspects



The available information suggests a dichotomy between countries such as  Denmark and Sweden whose fishermen prefer to use the Bacoma window  and  other  countries  particularly  Poland  and  Germany  where  the  T90  codend is the more attractive alternative. 



There  are  allegations  of  circumvention  of  the  gear  measures  but  without  documented evidence no assessment of the impact of such practices on se‐ lectivity can be made. 



Both gears have their advantages and disadvantages in terms of practical‐ ity or perceived benefits in terms of fish quality or fuel efficiency. These are  of  limited  relevance  from  a  stock  management  perspective  but  may  offer  incentives for fishermen to adopt the selective gear options. 



Given  the  likely  negative  effects  on  selectivity,  a  review  of  the  current  regulations  regarding  permissible  gear  attachments  e.g.  chafers,  rescue  floats  etc.  should  be  carried  out  in  order  to  establish  whether  there  is  a  need for their continued usage. 

Because  limited  resources  were  available,  only  a  preliminary  analysis  could  be  car‐ ried out which, for the most part, served to identify potential data sources for a com‐ prehensive  analysis.  From  a  review  of  all  existing  literature,  only  limited  selectivity  data  were  found  for  the  fisheries  covered  by  WGSSDS.  The  majority  of  these  data  were  historic  and  may  not  necessarily  represent  current  fishing  practice  (i.e.  gear  type, codend mesh size/material) or stock structures. The summary data identified is  shown in Table 4 below. Raw data is available for the Irish trials.  This report was forwarded to ICES and STECF. STECF carried out their own analysis  and concluded the following:  “STECF supports the ICES findings and concludes that it has not been possible on basis of the  available information to answer the question if the Bacoma and the T90 trawls have similar  selectivity  properties.  Answering  the  question  would  require  a  series  of  coordinated  experi‐ ments”.  “STECF notes that the current exploitation pattern on cod of the trawl fishery allows the ex‐ ploitation of immature cod. This result in a suboptimal utilisation of the cod stocks in the Bal‐ tic. Improved exploitation pattern with reduced mortality on juveniles will not only provide  for higher yields but also contribute to the recovery of the eastern cod stock. Therefore STECF 

 

12 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

recommends that measures resulting in improved exploitation pattern for Baltic cod be con‐ sidered”.  3.1.3

Request from WGSSDS on selection patterns

Prior  to  the  2008  WGFTFB  meeting  in  the  Faroe  Islands,  request  from  WGSSDS  to  provide gear selection curves for species with high discard rates was examined.   Limited resources meant that only a preliminary analysis could be carried out, which  primarily identified potential data sources for a much more comprehensive analysis.  From a review of all existing literature, only limited selectivity data was found for the  fisheries  covered  by  WGSSDS  with  the  majority  being  historic  data,  which  may  not  necessarily  represent  current  fishing  practice  (i.e.  gear  type,  codend  mesh  size/material)  or  stock  structures.  The  summary  data  identified  is  shown  in  Table  4  below. Raw data is available for the Irish trials.  Table 4. Summary Selectivity Data.  Species

 

Country

Area

Date

Gear Type

Mesh Size

L50

SR

Haddock1 

Ireland 

VIIj 

08/2004 

SSC 

90mm x  6mm  single 

30.14 

8.31 

Haddock1 

Ireland 

VIIj 

08/2004 

SSC 

100mm x  6mm  single 

34.47 

7.34 

Haddock1 

Ireland 

VIIj 

08/2004 

SSC 

110mm x  6mm  single 

36.87 

11.36 

Whiting2 

Ireland 

VIIg 

02/1996 

OTB 

90mm x  4mm  single 

23.06 

11.64 

Haddock2 

Ireland 

VIIg 

02/1996 

OTB 

90mm x  4mm  single 

19.09 

12.73 

Plaice2 

Ireland 

VIIg 

02/1996 

OTB 

90mm x  4mm  single 

16.80 

5.46 

Megrim2 

Ireland 

VIIg 

02/1996 

OTB 

90mm x  4mm  single 

19.52 

7.62 

Whiting 2 

Ireland 

VIIg 

04/1996 

OTB 

90mm x  4mm  single  with  90mm  SMP 

32.72 

12.36 

Hake3 

Spain 

VIIIa 

12/1998 

OTB 

70mm x  double  4mm 

30 

10.95 

Hake3 

Spain 

VIIIa 

05/1999 

OTB 

70mm x  double  4mm 

27.2 

13.45 

Hake3 

Spain 

VIIIa,b 

07/1999 

OTB 

70mm x  double  4mm 

30.3 

1.16 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Species

Country

Area

Date

Gear Type

Mesh Size

L50

SR

Hake3 

Spain 

VIIIa,b 

11/1999 

OTB 

70mm x  double  4mm 

30.7 

5.94 

Hake4 

Spain 

VIIIa 

1999 

OTB 

80mm 

23.5 

13.3 

Hake4 

Spain 

VIIIa 

1999 

OTB 

100mm 

46.2 

18.6 

Hake4 

Spain 

VIIIb,d 

1999 

PTB 

80mm 

22.6 

19.2 

Spain 

VIIIb.d 

1999 

PTB 

100mm 

34.6 

6.6 

Megrim  

Spain 

VIIIa 

1999 

OTB 

80mm PA 

20.1 

2.5 

Megrim4 

Spain 

VIIIb,d 

1985 

OTB 

60mm PA 

12.8 

6.4 

Megrim4 

Spain 

VIIIb,d 

1985 

OTB 

70mm PA 

20.8 

9.1 

Megrim  

Spain 

VIIIb,d 

1985 

OTB 

60mm PA 

13.0 

5.3 

Megrim4 

Spain 

VIIIb,d 

1985 

OTB 

70mm PA 

20.3 

6.1 

Hake   4

4

4

1

| 13

 Anon., 2005; 2 Anon., 1997; 3 Puente., 2001; 4 Meixide and Pereiro., 1997. 

In  addition  there  are  a  number  of  catch  comparison  datasets  available  from  Ireland  and France on a range of species, fisheries, gears and codend mesh sizes. These data‐ sets  provide  simple  length  frequency  data  but  no  L50s.  A  simple  method  based  on  Generalised Liner Mixed Models (GLMM) has recently been developed by Revill and  Holst (in prep.) that allows a better analysis of catch comparison data. This method  uses  polynomial  approximations  to  fit  the  proportions  caught  in  control  and  test  codends. This method was presented at FTFB as a new method of analysis and some  of these datasets could be run through this model if required. Catch comparison data‐ sets available that could be looked at are shown in Table 5.  Table 5. Catch Comparison Data Available.  Species

Country

Area

Year

Gear type

Experiment details

Whiting,  Haddock,  Hake 

Ireland 

VIIg 

2003 

OTB (Twin‐ rig) 

Inclined  Separator Panel  vs 80 mm x  6 mm single  codend 

Whiting, cod,  haddock 

Ireland 

VIIg 

2000 

OTB (twin‐ rig) 

Inclined  separator panel  vs 80 mm x  3.5 mm single  codend 

Whiting,  haddock 

Ireland 

VIIg, VIIj 

2000 

OTB 

Inclined  separator panel  vs 80 mm x  3.5mm single  codend 

Whiting,  haddock,  hake 

Ireland 

VIIj 

2000/2001 

SSC 

90 mm Codend  with 90 mm  SMP vs 80 mm x  4mm single  codend 

Whiting,  haddock,  hake, cod 

Ireland 

VIIg 

2002 

SSC 

100 mm x 4 mm  double vs 80  mm x 4 mm  single 

 

14 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Species

Country

Area

Year

Gear type

Experiment details

Haddock,  Whiting,  Hake 

Ireland 

VIIg 

2002 

SSC 

Large mesh top  sheet net/80 mm  x 6 mm codend  vs standrad  seine/80 mm x 6  mm codend 

Haddock 

Ireland 

VIIj 

2001 

OTB 

100 mm x single  6 mm; 100 mm x  double 4 mm;  110 mm x single  6 mm vs 80mm  x 6 mm single 

Monkfish 

Ireland 

VIIg,VIIj 

2002 

OTB (Twin‐ rig) 

Bottom sheet  escape  panel/100 mm x  6 mm codend vs  100 mm x 6 mm  codend 

Nephrops,  hake 

France 

VIIIa,b 

2003/2004 

OTB  

Flexible grid/70  mm x 4 mm  codend vs 70  mm codend 

Nephrops,  hake 

France 

VIIIa,b 

2006 

OTB  

Flexible  grid/70mm x 4  mm codend vs  70 mm codend 

Nephrops,  hake 

France 

VIIIa,b 

2006 

OTB 

80 mm x 4 mm  vs 70 mm x 4  mm 

Nephrops,  hake 

France 

VIIIa,b 

2006 

OTB 

70 mm x 4 mm  with 70 mm  SMPvs 70 mm x  4 mm 

Monkfish,  Megrim, ray 

France 

VIIIa,b 

1993 

OTB 

Monkish sorting  grid vs 70 mm x  4 mm codend 

Monkfish,  megrim, ray 

France 

VIIh, VIIIa 

1997 

OTB (Twin‐ rig) 

Monkfish  sorting grid vs  70 mm x 4 mm  codend  

  In 2008 the EU will focus on mitigation of discards associated with a key number of  fisheries in community waters. Given part of this process will be to identify candidate  technical measures suitable for these fisheries which will achieve measurable targeted  reductions,  the  whole  area  of  gear  selectivity  will  be  revisited  by  FTFB  and  also  in  other fora such as MariFish and STECF. A specific ToR was agreed at FTFB for 2009  which aims:  “To review and appraise the current selectivity characteristics of the gears used in the  fisheries identified by the EU as candidate fisheries”; and  “To propose potential gear modifications that could contribute to the future technical  conservation measures needed to achieve the targets proposed by the EU”.   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 15

It  should  be  noted  that,  given  one  of  the  candidate  fisheries  selected  by  the  EU  is  Nephrops fisheries in the Celtic Sea, further analysis of the selectivity of gears used in  these fisheries will be carried out, and this should be of assistance to WGSSDS.   3.2

Request from ACE on the use of VMS data There was a suggestion by ACE for a new EG to work by correspondence to look into  e.g. the availability of VMS data, interpretation of these data and the potential for set‐ ting up buffer zones for MPAs using this kind of data.  It was suggested that relevant  ToRs that might otherwise be dealt with by WGDEC be directed instead to this new  group.  It  was  concluded  that  fishery  technologists  should  be  involved  with  this  work  and  the following ToR was directed to WGFTFB:   “For a range of representative fishing gears operating on offshore waters, begin a considera‐ tion of the fishing methods employed (including water depth, warp length, frequency of VMS  returns  and  positional  relationship  between  trawl  and vessel)  that will  influence  the dimen‐ sions of ‘buffer zones’ around Marine Protected Areas to ensure that trawls do not damage the  seabed.”  No action to date has been taken on this request and FTFB await direction from the  Secretariat regarding required input from FTFB. The comment was made that there is  extensive  work  going  on  in  this  area  in  the  US  and  this  may  be  useful  as  reference  material. 

3.3

Meeting of WGFTFB Chair with EU Commission and Net manufacturers on technical measures regulations In July 2007, the WGFTFB met with net manufacturers and the EU at the invitation of  the  EU  to  discuss  the  revision  of  the  Technical  Conservation  Measures  regulations  currently  being  undertaken  by  the  Commission.  Nine  net  manufacturers  attended  this  meeting,  representing  the  North‐east  Atlantic,  Bay  of  Biscay,  Mediterranean,  North Sea and Skagerrak and Kattegat. A range of issues were discussed at this meet‐ ing as summarised below:  1 ) Codend  Definition:  The  current  definition  of  codends  and/or  extension  piece  has  been  identified  as  being  confusing,  given  the  differences  in  ter‐ minology used in different countries and also differences in trawl design.  The  Commission  are  therefore  proposing  to  re‐define  “codend”  as  being  the  last  8  0r  10  metres  of  the  trawl  (bottom  trawls)  only  and  possibly  the  last 20m‐30m of a pelagic trawl. This would very much be seen as a length  for regulatory purposes (“Enforcement length”) i.e. codend circumference,  twine  thickness,  mesh  size,  attachment  legislation  would  apply  to  this  length. There is also consideration of including a minimum mesh size for  the  whole  trawl  i.e.  in  a  demersal  trawl  no  mesh  can  be  less  than  80mm.  Such  a  condition  exists  in  the  Baltic.  There  was  general  support  for  these  proposals  by  the  netmakers,  except  concerns  about  the  implications  for  nephrops  trawls  if  the  codend  mesh  size  was  increased  to  100mm  for  in‐ stance  in  the  future,  most  fishermen  would  have  to  replace  the  bottom  wings and  belly  sheets,  given  these  are  still  constructed  in  70–80mm  cur‐ rently. There was also some concern regarding pelagic codends given their  design and the need for a “pumping” section.  2 ) Twine  Thickness:  There  is  acceptance  by  the  EU  that  the  current  regula‐ tions on twine thickness are unworkable and the measuring methodology   

16 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

unenforceable and too subjective. While there is undoubtedly some corre‐ lation between selectivity and twine thickness/stiffness, the EU have iden‐ tified that there are easier parameters that have an effect on selectivity that  can  be  better  controlled.  The  netmakers  made  the  point  that  basically  the  twine thickness of twine they provided depended on the customer – give  the  customer  what  he  wants!  The  EU  proposal  is  to  retain  a  maximum  twine  thickness,  harmonised  by  areas  but  would  probably  amend  the  measurement methodology. Labelling/Certification is seen as having a role  in ensuring twine thickness.  3 ) Codend  Circumference:  The  EU  have  identified  codend  circumference  as  having  a  major  bearing  and  selectivity,  largely  on  the  basis  of  a  recent  STECF sub‐group meeting. They are intent on harmonising the codend cir‐ cumference regulations for demersal gears and the proposed start point is  for  a  max.  of  100  meshes  for  all  gears  with  a  mesh  size  greater  than  70/80mm.  The  netmakers  did  not  voice  any  strong  objections  to  this,  al‐ though more research is needed for the smaller mesh sizes in order to sat‐ isfy strength and excessive narrowing of codends.  4 ) Strengthening  Bags:  Again  the  EU  has  identified  strengthening  bags  as  detrimental to selectivity and are intent on prohibiting their use. They ac‐ cept that are some countries where there use is widespread and would ac‐ cept derogations if a case could be made on safety grounds. However, the  majority of the netmakers did not see this as a major problem (except Ire‐ land in the nephrops fishery) although stressed the need for some research  to address these concerns. The issue of attachments such as chafers, round  straps  and  strengthening  ropes  was  raised  and  the  point  was  made  that  top‐side  chafers  in  particular  have  a  detrimental  effect  on  selectivity.  The  EU agreed to look at this regulation and amend accordingly.   5 ) Selective Devices: The use of selective devices should be encouraged in the  new regulations but specific details would probably be based contained in  Commission  regulations.  Two  major  issues  were  raised  regarding  Square  Mesh Panels – position and joining ratio. The EU seem intent on introduc‐ ing a regulation on position at around 5–6m from the codend to fit in with  the codend definition but this position could be altered on a regional basis  to match specific fishery problems. Joining ratio was felt important but the  current 2:1 ratio seems okay except where there are significant changes in  mesh  sizes  i.e.  120mm  into  80mm  mesh.  The  issue  of  measurement  of  square mesh was also raised, as there seems to some differences in meth‐ odologies  being  adopted  by  different  inspectorates.  The  question  of  ap‐ propriate material was discussed and the netmakers felt that both knotted  and  knotless  twine  could  be  used  as  long  as  the  material  used  was  of  a  good  quality  and  relatively  stiff  to  maintain  shape.  There  was  a  lengthy  debate  on  the  relative  merits  of  BACOMA  vs.  T90 and  a  concern  was  ex‐ pressed  that  the  current  regulations  did  not  facilitate  the  use  of  T90  sec‐ tions  above  the  codend.  The  EU  seemed  broadly  in  favour  of  the  use  of  T90.The Dutch netmaker reported on trials with hexagonal mesh codends  for release of juvenile horse mackerel.  6 ) Codend Geometry: There was no major debate on this issue, except it was  felt that the current regulations requiring cylindrical codends should apply  only  to  demersal  trawls  given  the  differences  in  designs  of  pelagic  codends, which are often purposely built cone shaped or have wider sec‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 17

tions  fro  fish  quality  and  to  facilitate  pumping.  The  EU  accepted  this  as  sensible.  7 ) Certification/Labelling: There was a general discussion on the possibility of  netmakers certifying netting/codends sold to fishermen. The netmakers felt  in principle this was feasible to a certain degree i.e. particularly mesh size  but  did  not  want  to  have  an  legal  responsibility  once  the  codend  left  the  factory  as  they  had  no  control  of  how  fishermen  would  use  the  codend  subsequently.  They  were  in  favour  of  adoption  of  the  OMEGA  gauge  given its accuracy and saw this as an integral part of a certification scheme.  They agreed collectively to examine this issue more closely and report back  to the EU. The EU also mentioned the meeting in Bergen on ISO standards  for  netting,  although  none  of  the  netmakers  seemed  to  be  aware  of  this  meeting.   8 ) General Points: The netmakers stressed the need to consider pelagics and  demersal trawls separately and not generalise. The issues in pelagic trawls  are generally not selectivity issues but for fish quality and optimum water  flow.  The  EU  accepted  this  as  reasonable  and  agreed  to  ensure  this  was  taken account of in the new regulations.   3.4

SGMIXMAN The  Chair  of  WGFTFB  participated  in  the  Study  Group  on  Mixed  Management  (SGMIXMAN)  meeting  in  January  2008  at  the  request  of  the  Chair.  At  this  meeting  the  continuing  input  by  FTFB  to  the  Assessment  Working  Groups  and  appropriate  approaches for provision of this input were discussed. A lot of this information has  direct relevance to the work of SGMIXMAN and other Expert Groups, in addressing  some  of  the  data  constraints/deficiencies  currently  associated  with  the  provision  of  fisheries‐based  advice.  WGFTFB  has  strived  to  provide  quantified  information  but still  struggles  with  how  to relate  the  knowledge  (albeit  subjective  at  times)  gear  technologists  have  with  the signals  and trends  observed  by  stock  assessment  scien‐ tists.  Put  simply  FTFB  can  identify/verify  problems or  changes  not necessarily detected  elsewhere  but  cannot  always  quantify  the  effect as  a  Work‐ ing  Group  because  the  members  do  not  necessarily  have access  to  the  detailed  data  catch or effort data or have the time or skills to do a more complex analysis.  A com‐ bination of these factors has meant that a lot of this information is lost in the advisory  process but nonetheless given that ICES provides stock assessments for only ~ 50% of  stocks currently, the need to look at such “soft” fisheries information is still consid‐ ered necessary by FTFB and this was stressed to SGMIXMAN.  In  addition  to  the  provision  of  fishery  information,  the  issue  of  effort  measurement  was also raised by the Chair. This has wider implications for stock assessment than  just the development of mixed fisheries management models and FTFB have identi‐ fied  this  as  a  major  issue  with  current  management  systems  for  a  number  of  years.  This is a complex issue that will not be solved in the immediate future. However, the  Chair outlined the ToRs of the Study Group on combining gear parameters into effort  and capacity metrics (SGGEM) which was established by FTC to address this issue. 

3.5

AMAWGC The  Chair  of  WGFTFB  participated  in  AMAWGC  in  February  2007  to  discuss  the  provision of fisheries information. As in 2007 the Assessment Chairs were supportive  of the efforts of FTFB although again stressed the need for better quantification of the  information. There was also a discussion about the new Benchmark Workshops that   

18 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

have  been  introduced  into  the  Assessment  process.  It  was  felt  that  this  could  be  an  appropriate forum for formulation and integration of FTFB information.  3.6

SGBYC The Chair of WGFTFB participated in the Study Group for Bycatch of Protected Spe‐ cies (SGBYC) in January 2008. The main issue of relevance to FTFB was ToR a):   “Review of methods and technologies that have been used to minimise bycatch of species  of interest, including methods that have failed”.  This term of reference is linked to ToR (d) addressed by WGFTFB (Section 13). The Study  Group compiled a preliminary list of methods and technologies that have been used  to minimise bycatches of species of concern, and spent time reviewing the problems  associated with the application of pingers (acoustic deterrent devices) in static gear as  a cetacean bycatch mitigation measure. Although mandated in the US and EU, pinger  deployment has proven difficult to implement for a variety of reasons. In reviewing  these reasons, the Study Group proposed a framework for the development and im‐ plementation  of  future  mitigation  measures.  The  SG  recommended  that  any  further  mitigation plans for minimising cetacean or other protected species bycatches should  be introduced only after careful consideration of all of the above mentioned factors. 

4

ICES draft science plan 2007–2013 Bill  Karp  the  FTC  Chair  led  a  discussion  on  the  ICES  Draft  Science  Plan  2008–2013.  The  discussion  mainly  centred  on  the  17  identified  themes  and  the  prioritisation  of  seven of these themes. Apart from one of these seven themes, the remit of WGFTFB is  largely  outside  these  priority  areas  and  therefore  concerns  were  expressed  by  FTFB  members  that  there  was a  danger  participation  in  the  Group  may  diminish, if Insti‐ tute Directors do not feel gear technology is considered an important issue by ICES.  There were also concerns expressed regarding the proposal of ICES acting as a project  co‐ordinator in the future. The feeling was that this could bring ICES into direct con‐ flict  with  national  laboratories.  The  conclusion  from  this  debate  was  that  while  WGFTFB supported the need for change within the ICES structure, the seeming de‐ motion of fisheries assessment and measurement of fisheries impact was felt a danger  to the continued existence of the Working Group. A response to this plan was drafted  by  Bill  Karp  and  WG  chair  taking  account  submissions  from  other  WGFTFB  and  WGFAST members. This response was forwarded to ICES Secretariat.  

5

Report from Study Group on the Development of Fish Pots for Commercial Fisheries and Survey Purposes (SGPOT) The  Study  Group  on  the  Development  of  Fish  Pots  for  Commercial  Fisheries  and  Survey Purposes (SGPOT) SGPOT was proposed by the topic group on ʺAlternative  fishing  gearsʺ  that  met  at  the  FTFB  meeting  in  2005  and  2006.  SGPOT  had  its  first  meeting 21–22 April 2007 in Dublin, Ireland and this second meeting was held in Tór‐ shavn, Faroe Islands 19–20 April 2008 prior to the FTFB meeting.  The  group  work  was  attended  by  24  participants  representing  14  countries.  The  agenda followed the Terms of Reference closely.  A  review  of  worldwide  use  of  fish  pots  that  was  initiated  at  last  year  meeting  was  continued. It seems difficult to identify worldwide catch data for fish pots as these are  generally mixed with other gears. In order to partly address this the group decided to  make  an  extensive  list  of  use  of  fish  pots  in  commercial  use,  as  research  tool  and   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 19

emerging use of fish pots, as this was felt a valuable platform for exchange of infor‐ mation.  In a discussion of new fish pot research several examples were presented. In Norway  the  two‐chamber  pot  has  been  redesigned  with  a  single  entrance  and  modified  to  float  off  bottom.  Trials  carried  out  have  yielded  a  45%  higher  catch  rate  of  cod.  In  Sweden the deformation of the Norwegian pot when floated off bottom in high cur‐ rent  has  been  tested  in  flume  tank  as  this  had  proved  a  major  problem  in  Swedish  trials.  New  attachments  and  extra  buoyancy  were  tested  to  counteract  deformation  with good results.  A  discussion  on  the  fundament  research  needs  on  fish  behaviour  to  improve  the  catching  efficiency and also  enhance  the  use of  pots  as assessment  tools  had a  slow  start as this seems to be a complex subject and involving a wide variety of variables.  Although  it  was  agreed  lessons  can  be  learned  from  other  baited  gear,  the  behav‐ ioural component is much more important for fish pots. The discussion centered on  attraction variables and what predisposes a fish to be caught and actual capture proc‐ ess  examples  were  discussed.  Group  members  agreed  to  further  on  this  issue  and  prepare text to be discussed by the Group.  In a discussion on design and ecosystem effects the main issue was ghost fishing and  also  the  need  to  develop  responsible  codes  of  practice.  There  was  a  lengthy  discus‐ sion with regard to design and operation of fish pots.  The terminology to be used for defining fish pots was discussed and it was agreed a  generic figure with common terms will be developed. The group also discussed the  definition of a fish pot as the group had reservations with the draft definition as pre‐ sented by the FTFB Topic Group on Gear Classification.  The group also discussed gear conflicts, which seems to be one of the main contribu‐ tors to ghost fishing. Spatial and temporal separation of gears seemed to be the best  method  to  avoid  conflicts  but  also  designs  incorporating  features  such  as  rounded  corners and few surface lines may reduce conflicts.  The  outline  of  a  Cooperative  Research  Report  was  discussed  and  group  members  were  assigned  to  prepare  text  for  the  report  with  a  deadline  of  Christmas  2008.  SGPOT will work by correspondence and meet at the FTFB meeting 2009. 

6

Report from Working Group on Quantifying All Fishing Mortality (WGQAF) Philip MacMullen, Chair of the newly‐formed WGQAF, described to FTFB members  the proceedings and recommendations of the first meeting of WGQAF.  The  new  WG  was  an  evolution  from  the  previous  SGUFM,  chaired  by  Mike  Breen.  The  meeting  had  involved  a  series  of  presentations  of  background  information,  re‐ search results and discussion topics. These included:  •

Alan Fréchet – Inclusion of Escape Mortality in Stock Assessment, 



Phil MacMullen – Industry/Science Solutions in a Data Poor Elasmobranch  Fishery, 



Mike Breen – Ghost Fishing in Static Gears (Pots), and 



Irene  Huse  –  Purse  Seine  Slipping  Mortality  in  North  Atlantic  Mackerel  (and herring). 

 

20 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

The WG had also discussed a number of topics in some detail. Most of these explored  the way the WG should operate and future areas of work:  •

the inconsistency in dealing with all components of F in stock assessments, 



the need to look at the uncertainty associated with discard & other sources  of mortality data and how this could best be accommodated in the assess‐ ment process, 



revisiting the definitions of ‘bycatch’ & associated terms, 



the  potential  importance  of  industry  self‐sampling  as  a  means  of  gaining  more comprehensive mortality data, 



IUU  and  the  potential  for  obtaining  useful  information  from  industry  sources and the supply chain, 



the  potential  significance  of  mortality  in  non‐quota  and  non‐commercial  species, 



the use of multispecies and ecosystem monitoring to help identify gaps in  fishing mortality data, 



issues relating to the recovery of lost fishing gears, and 



the need for improved outreach within ICES and at national levels  

Future terms of reference would be framed around:  •

continued work on application of UM data to stock assessments, 



a review of information on IUU available from fishing companies and op‐ tions for using same,  



review the status and content of US National Bycatch Report, 



a  review  of  best  practices  for  reducing  ‘collateral’  mortality  in  fisheries,  and 



a review of the potential for self sampling to address mortality questions. 

A number of specific actions were also identified 

7



update  reports  on  incorporation  of  components  of  F  in  stock  assessment  through direct contact with WG chairs and AMAWGC,  



developing lines of communication with WGECO, 



proposing a joint topic group on definitions of bycatch & associated terms  with WGFTFB for 2009 meeting,  



to meet for 1–2 days before WGFTFB in 2009, and 



to encourage more (and broader) participation in the WG 

FAO request for clarification on Bycatch terminology Over  the  last  four  decades,  much  concern  has  been  expressed  by  fishery  managers  and conservation/environmental groups that bycatch and discards may be contribut‐ ing  to  biological  overfishing  and  altering  the  structure  of  marine ecosystems.  In  the  last two decades, the search for solutions to bycatch problems has intensified.   While the term “discards” is self explanatory, the same cannot be said for term “by‐ catch”. In 1992 Murawski 1 noted “the use of the term bycatch adds considerable con‐                                                             1

In Alverson, D.L., Freeberg, M.H., Pope, J.G., Murawski, S.A. A global assessment of fisheries bycatch and discards. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 339. Rome, FAO. 1994. 233p.

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 21

fusion to a topic that is already complex to both scientists and managers”.... The term  is  relatively  imprecise  in  that  it  constitutes  a  value  judgment  and  may  be  inaccurate  when  used over any extended time to describe an element within a multi‐species catch. In essence,  “yesterdayʹs bycatch may be todayʹs target species.”   Presently, there is no international standard definition of bycatch. Some national by‐ catch  definitions  exist  but  there  is  inconsistency  between  definitions.  Older  defini‐ tions of bycatch include retained incidental species and discards while in more recent  definitions the retained incidental catch is excluded. Some of the changes to bycatch  definitions (e.g. Australia and USA) reflect (i) the trend from single species to multi‐ species  management  and  (ii)  recognition  that  ghost  fishing  mortality  and  encounter  mortality may be high for some gear types in some situations.   The term bycatch is confusing, with protagonists and antagonists in the bycatch de‐ bate selecting definitions that favour their position.   The need for a coherency on terms used to describe catch components While  there  is  a  broad‐based  agreement  that  all  species  retained  for  sale  should  be  part  of  an  effective  fisheries  management  plan  and  that  discards  should  be  mini‐ mized, the use of the term bycatch in this context is extremely problematic.  From an FAO perspective, a review of definitions and terms would be worthwhile if  it removed the ambiguity associated with terms such as bycatch, target species, inci‐ dental catch etc. Further, a review would be justified if it led to replacement or revi‐ sion  of  terms  and  that  these  new  terms  /  revisions  were  accepted  by  ICES  member  and non member countries.   Accordingly, FAO requests that FTFB to consider the following; 

8



The  compilation  and  assessment  definitions  and  terms  associated  with  catch, bycatch and discards; 



Whether the term “bycatch” has outlived its usefulness as a universal de‐ scriptor of part of the catch;  



The  drafting  of  a  new  definition(s)  of  terms  used  to  describe  the  various  catch components. 

Update on Gear Classification Topic The Chair gave an update of the current position regarding the production of a new  gear classification manual as a replacement of the existing 1971 FAO Technical Paper  222. The development of this manual had been a ToR for WGFTFB in 2006 and 2007  and significant progress has been made in completing a final draft. However, a num‐ ber of factors since the last WGFTFB meeting in 2007 had meant that the process had  now stalled. This was due to the fact that the original conveners of this ToR have ei‐ ther retired or have taken up positions in the private sector. Also the individual who  had been identified to produce the drawings for the manual had indicated that they  were  not  now  willing  to  complete  this  task.  The  text  therefore  remains  about  90%  complete  but  no  alternative  illustrator  has  been  identified.  FAO  indicated  that  they  remain committed to the completion the manual and reported to WGFTFB on a pro‐ posed way forward. This would entail identifying an individual to finishing drafting  text and an alternative illustrator to complete the diagrams. This was agreed by FTFB  as the best way forward. No financial commitment has been made towards publica‐ tion costs at this stage. 

 

22 |

9

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

WWF Smart Gear Competition Dr  Andy  Revill,  CEFAS,  UK,  presented  information  about  the  2007  WWF  “Smart  Gear”  competition.  Initiated  by  WWF  in  2005,  the  competition  the  competition  has  now  22  worldwide  sponsors  including  private  companies  such  as  Mustad  and  Sealord as well as research institutes such as CEFAS, DFO and Seafish. The objective  of  the  competition  is  to  inspire  innovative,  practical,  cost‐effective  ideas  that  allow  fishermen to fish “smarter” – to better target their intended catch while reducing by‐ catch.  The  competition  is  open  to  all:  fishermen,  professional  gear  manufacturers,  teachers, students, engineers, scientists and backyard inventors. The numbers of en‐ tries received to date have been:  2005: 50 entries from 16 countries  2006: 83 entries from 26 countries  2007: 70 entries from 22 countries  Entries are judged by an international panel made up of gear technologists, fisheries  experts, seafood industry representatives, fishermen, scientists, researchers and con‐ servationists. The Grand Prize winner for 2007 was the “eliminator” trawl designed  by a team from the US. The “eliminator” trawl was designed to allow access to areas  previously closed because of mixed species fishery, and potential of catching cod. It  has  the  ability  to  allow  fishermen  to  access  abundant  supplies  of  haddock  while  avoiding  bycatch  of  cod.  It  is  currently  under  assessment  and  will  soon  be  adopted  into NOAA legislation. The runner up prize went to a bird‐scaring device called the  “traffic  cone”  developed  in  Argentina.  This  device  is  currently  under  trial  in  the  southern  hemisphere  with  further  trials  planned  in  Alaska.  The  second  runner‐up  was a nested cylinder bycatch reduction device developed in the US. The designer of  this device is working with WWF, Ocean Conservancy and NOAA Fisheries to assist  with certification trials for Gulf of Mexico shrimp fisheries. There will be no competi‐ tion  in  2008  to  allow  fund  raising  and  attraction  of  additional  sponsors  but  it  is  ex‐ pected to run in 2009. 

10

ToR a): Species Separation in demersal trawls Conveners: Pingguo He (USA) and Mike Pol (USA)  

10.1 General Overview Bottom trawl fisheries on the both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, as well as in the Medi‐ terranean  Sea,  target  a  number  of  groundfish  species  and  species  groups.  Here  “groundfish” includes all fish species targeted by bottom otter trawls. In recent years,  some  species  in  the  demersal  complex  have  become  heavily  exploited  while  others  have shown good recovery. For example, in the northeastern USA, the New England  Fisheries  Management  Council  reported  substantial  increases  in  overall  biomass  of  twelve managed groundfish species but the growth was not uniform among species  or  stocks.  Among  those  stocks,  Georges  Bank  haddock  (Melanogrammus  aeglefinus)  spawning  biomass showed  the  greatest  increase in  recent  years.  On  the  other  hand,  cod  (Gadus  morhua)  stocks  are  still  being  “overfished”  and  experiencing  “overfish‐ ing”.  Along  with  the  cod  stocks,  all  four  yellowtail  flounder  (Limanda  ferruginea)  stocks in the northeastern US are considered as “overfished” and experiencing “over‐ fishing”.  This  phenomenon  of  mixed  fisheries  of  healthy  and  depleted  stocks  is  not  unique to fisheries in the northeastern USA.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 23

Often, the status of one of the stocks captured in a trawl fishery may call for decreas‐ ing fishing mortality (e.g. cod and plaice in the North Sea, hake in the Western Atlan‐ tic  and  Mediterranean  waters  and  associated  recovery  plans).  Of  the  mixture  of  different fish species encountered and caught, retention of only some species may be  desired.  Excluding such species from catching by separating them early in the fishing process  and releasing them in situ from the net will likely contribute to stock recovery, as sur‐ vival rates prior to haulback of gear can be high in many cases. Therefore, there is a  need to define, develop, synthesize, and distribute means and strategies to selectively  harvest  healthy  stocks  while  causing  minimal  mortalities  to  the  depleted  stocks  by  avoiding their interactions with the gear, releasing them at early stages of capture or  at least at fishing depth. This report is a result of a topic group of ICES‐FAO Working  Group on Fishing Technology and Fish Behaviour which met in 2007 in Dublin, Ire‐ land and in 2008 in Tórshavn, Faeroe Islands. The report reviews behavioural differ‐ ences among demersal species near demersal trawls and methods to separate them in  bottom trawl fisheries.   10.2 Terms of Reference The topic group was charged to:  •

Identify  recent  behavioural  and  gear  research  into  the  separation  of  groundfish species in demersal trawl gears; 



Identify basic principles, strategies, and effectiveness of groundfish separa‐ tion techniques; 

Some groundfish species or stocks of these species are in low biomass, or overfished,  while  others are  in  healthy  conditions.  Efficient  exploitation  of  healthy stocks  while  reducing or eliminating the capture of overfished stocks would provide industry and  management  means  for  sustainable  utilization  and  management  of  the  resource.  Many  members  of  WGFTFB  have  been  involved  in  the  area  of  research  for  many  years. The topic group will concentrate on behaviour and species separation in com‐ mercial  species.  A  summary  of  the  status  of  knowledge  and  future  directions  in  re‐ search and application would greatly benefit FTFB members and the fishing industry.  10.3 List of Participants Arill Engås  Kristian Zachariasssen  Benoît Vincent  Ludvig Krag  Bent Herrmann  Mathias Paschen  Daniel Valentinsson  Michael Pol  Dave Reid  Ólafur Ingólfsson  David Chosid  Oleg Lapshin  Eduardo Grimaldo  Paulo Fonseca  Emma Jones  Pingguo He  Emmon Jackson  Rikke Petri Frandsen  Irene Huse 

IMR  FFL  IFREMER  DTU‐Aqua  DTU‐Aqua  BFAFI  IMR  Mass. Div of Fisheries  FRS  MRI  Mass. Div of Fisheries  IMR  Univ of Tromso  IPIMAR  FRS  Univ  of  New  Hamp‐ shire  BIM  DTU Aqua  IMR 

Norway  Faeroe Islands  France  Denmark  Denmark  Germany  Sweden  USA  Scotland  Iceland  USA  Russia  Norway  Portugal  Scotland  USA  Ireland  Denmark  Norway 

 

24 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Rosyioi Imron  Jose Alio  Waldemar Moderhak  Abdelhak Lahnin   Adnan Tokac   Altan Lök   Bob Van Marlen   Chris Glass   Gerard Bavouzet   Hans Polet   Haraldur Einarsson   Jens Floeter   Ken Arkley  Bundit Chokesanguan 

Directorate of Fish  INIA  SFI  INRH  Ege University  Ege University  IMARES  Univ.  of  New  Hamp‐ shire  IFREMER  ILVO  MRI  VTI‐OSF  SFIA  SEAFDEC 

Indonesia  Venezuela  Poland  Morocco  Turkey  Turkey  Netherlands  USA  France  Belgium  Iceland  Germany  UK  Thailand 

10.4 Actions The  group  developed  a  strategy  and  framework  for  considering  the  terms  of  refer‐ ence in Dublin. Over the intervening year, an outline for a final report or possible co‐ operative research report was developed, and some text was produced. In Tórshavn,  the group further developed the report outline by subdividing into groups. The result  of this effort was the production of a timeline for completion of the overall report and  an  expanded  outline  with  responsible  section  leaders  defined.  Additional  text  was  also developed during the meeting.  10.5 Timetable for completion of work •

Complete draft sections and send to He or Pol by: 13 December, 2008. Re‐ sponsible party: section leaders 



Send  to  ToR  a)  group  for  and  improve  draft  document  via  email.  Group  members to submit comments to Section leaders by 13 February, 2009 (Re‐ sponsible party: All ToR a) members) 



Section leader to submit revised final draft Final draft report ready by 13  March, 2009 



Responsible party: Section leaders 



Distribute the final draft report to ToR a) members final comments and re‐ turn comments by 13 April, 2009 Responsible party: P. He & M. Pol 



FTFB members by: One week before FTFB in May 2009 



Verbally present at the next FTFB meeting in May 2009 (Request some time  for presentation and discussion) 



Submit to ICES for publication in Cooperative Research Report by 31 July  2009 (if there are no serious problem with the final draft) 

10.6 Recommendations 1 ) WGFTFB  recommends  the  publication  of  an  ICES  Cooperative  Research  Report on Species Separation based on the work carried out by the Topic  Group.  Annex 7 gives the proposed outline of the CRR report, subject to change. Responsible  section leaders are also indicated. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 25

10.6.1 Summary of Haddock Symposium 2007 as it relates to species separation

M. Pol  Mass. Division of Marine Fisheries, 1213 Purchase St, New Bedford, MA, 02740, USA  Abstract A  symposium  on  haddock  conservation,  harvesting  and  management  was  held  in  Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA on 25–26 October 2007. Approximately 100 scien‐ tists, fishermen, managers and others from 5 countries attended the two‐day meeting.  Twenty  presentations  and  11  posters  were  exhibited.  Four  talks  on  haddock  behav‐ iour,  including  a  keynote  by  Clem  Wardle,  were  described.  Four  more  papers  on  avoidance of haddock were also described. Eight papers on separation of haddock in  different  zones  of  a  demersal  trawl  were  summarized.  Five  papers  on  separation  of  haddock in static gears were also summarized.  10.6.2 Can Yellowtail Flounder be harvested without bycatch of cod and haddock on Georges Bank? Real-time spatial-temporal fishing strategies

C. Glass  University of New Hampshire, 39 College Road, Durham NH, 03824, USA  Seasonal  and  year‐round  closures  of  fishing  grounds  have  been  useful  tools  for  the  Northeast Multispecies Fishery Management Plan (FMP) of the New England Fishery  Management  Council  (NEFMC).  These  closures  have  proven  effective  in  improving  the status of several species covered under the FMP, and in particular, the status of  Georges Bank (GB) yellowtail flounders.   The status of GB yellowtail flounder has improved markedly since the implementa‐ tion of Closed Area II in 1994. The spawning stock has increased from 2600 mt in 1992  to 33,500 mt in 1999. Mean biomass has also increased from 4,500 mt to 49,600 mt in  the same time period. In 2001 the TRAC Advisory Report on Stock Status estimates  the SSB to be between 37,000 and 50,500 mt (80% probability) and the mean biomass  to be between 48,000 and 66,500 mt (80% probability). This brings the GB yellowtail  flounder biomass well above the rebuilding target of 49,000 mt.  Here we report on a cooperative research program between the fishing industry and  scientists on an observer based survey program to document the quantity and com‐ position of catch and discards, and assess whether the rebuilt GB yellowtail flounder  stock, within Closed Area II, can be accessed on a seasonal basis without significant  bycatch of cod and haddock.   Results from this study demonstrate that cod, haddock and yellowtail flounder show  spatial  and  temporal  separation  and  that  yellowtail  can  be  harvested  without  a  sig‐ nificant bycatch and discard of either cod or haddock. Furthermore, the results show  evidence  of  clear  spatial/ecological  separation  between  major  species  showing  evi‐ dence of ecological niche separation. The results are discussed in terms of their impli‐ cations with regard to management of rebuilding and rebuilt stock access.  Key words: Yellowtail Flounder, Cod, Closed area, bycatch, spatial distribution.  Discussions

The author was asked how stable the patterns were between seasons. The explanation  was made that the study was conducted over three years and therefore the patterns   

26 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

were not fully know for the longer term. It was also explained that some fishers did  not  want  the  closed  area  to  be  opened  as  fishing  on  the  borders  of  the  closure  was  economically attractive and the opening of the area caused a reduction in viability.  10.6.3 UK trials with the eliminator trawl and a new simple method for catch comparison analysis

Andrew Revill*, Rene Holst**  *Centre for Environment Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), Pakefield Road, Lowest‐ oft, NR33 0HT, UK  **National  Institute  of  Aquatic  Resources,  Technical  University  of  Denmark  (DTU‐Aqua),  Box 101, DK‐9850 Hirstshals, Denmark  Abstract

This  study  reports  on  the  first  known  trailing  in  European  waters  of  a  new  Rhode  Island (USA) design of fishing trawl, known as the ‘Eliminator’. We found that this  trawl could be used to selectively harvest haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and  whiting  (Merlangius  merlangus)  in  the  North  Sea  while  allowing  cod  (Gadus  mor‐ hua) and other species to escape. Catches with the Eliminator trawl were consistently  dominated  by  both  whiting  and  haddock  while  cod  numbers  (of  all  lengths)  were  reduced by 89% compared to a control trawl. Cod accounted for 2% by weight, of the  marketable fish caught in the Eliminator, contrasted by 10% in the control trawl. As  North Sea cod stocks are overexploited and at risk of being fished unsustainably, this  trawl  may  be  a  useful  tool  to  integrate  within  the  ongoing  Northern  European  cod  recovery programme.  We propose a simple method based on Generalised Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to  analyse catch comparison data and use polynomial approximations to fit the propor‐ tions  caught  in  the  test  codend.  The  method  provides  comparison  at  lengths  of  the  two  gears  by  a  continuous  curve  with  a  realistic  confidence  band.  We  demonstrate  the  versatility  of  the  method  by  analysing  the  data  from  these  trials,  which  spans  a  range of species with different selective patterns.  Discussions

The author provided a demonstration of the data analysis with R routines for analys‐ ing  catch  comparison  data.  This  was  presented  to  interested  researchers  during  the  meeting and will be circulated to FTFB participants. 

11

ToR b): Advice to Assessment WG’s

11.1 General Overview This ToR was introduced at plenary by Dave Reid (FRS, Scotland) and a background  for the ToR was given. ICES is now asked to provide advice that is more holistic in  nature, including information on the influence and effects of human activities on the  marine ecosystem. From the fishing technology perspective this includes information  on how fishermen are responding and adapting to changes in regulatory frameworks  e.g.  the  introduction  of  effort  control;  technological  creep;  fleet  adaptations  to  other  issues e.g. fuel prices etc. In response to this WGFTFB initiated a ToR in 2005 to col‐ lect data and information that was appropriate for fisheries and ecosystem based ad‐ vice.  In  2006,  the  FAO‐ICES  WGFTFB  was  formally  requested  by  the  Advisory  Committee  on  Fisheries  Management  (ACFM)  to  provide  such  information  and  to   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 27

submit this to the appropriate Assessment Working Group. This type of information  is  becoming  more  and  more  important  at  both  international  and  national  levels.  It  demonstrates  that  the  community  of  gear  technologists  have  an  important  role  to  play in this and that our expertise is considered to be highly valued.   11.1.1 Terms of Reference

WGFTFB  should  explore  the  means  by  which  it  can  best  provide  appropriate  infor‐ mation for Assessment Working Groups and ACFM in fishery and ecosystem based  advice. This will include the information required for fisheries based forecasts, tech‐ nological  creep  and  changes  in fishing  practices,  implementation  of  regulations  and  other  fleet  adaptations,  ecosystem  effects  of  fishing  and  potential  mitigation  meas‐ ures. All areas for which ICES provide stock advice are considered.  11.1.2 General Issues

The conveners issued a circular questionnaire to the appropriate WGFTFB members  in  EU  countries  as  well  as  Norway,  Iceland  and  the  Faroe  Islands  during  February  2008 (see Annex 8). It contained a series of questions relating to recent changes within  the fleets observed and also highlighting gear/fleet/fishery related issues that are im‐ portant but are not currently recognised by Assessment WG’s. Where possible, con‐ tributors  were  requested  to  quantify  the  information  provided  or  state  how  the  information  has  been  derived  e.g.  common  knowledge,  personal  observations,  dis‐ cussions  with  industry  etc.  For  the  first  time  in  2008  information  on  Mediterranean  fisheries was supplied to GFCM.   Specifically FTFB members were asked to comment under the following headings:  •

Fleet Dynamics 



Technology Creep 



Technical Conservation Measures 



Ecosystem Effects 



Development of New Fisheries  

  Responses to the questionnaire were received from:  IMR, Norway IMR, Sweden CEFAS, UK-England BIM, Ireland AZTI, Spain ILVO, Belgium SFIA, UK-England

IMARES, Netherlands FRS, UK-Scotland FREMER, France IMR, Iceland FFL, Faroe Islands CNR-ISMAR – Italy

  The conveners worked by correspondence and met in Faroe Islands, 23—25 April dur‐ ing  the  WGFTFB  meeting  to  collate  the  information  provided.  The  full  information  for individual ICES Expert Groups is given in Annex 8 but some of the general issues  raised are summarised as follows:  Fleet Dynamics The overall picture from the questionnaires in 2008 is quite negative. Due to a combi‐ nation  of  soaring  fuel  prices,  reduced  quotas,  decreasing  fishing  opportunities  and   

28 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

volatile prices for several key species notably nephrops, haddock, cod, monkfish and  hake, there is a general air of despondency in the fleets across Europe. There seems to  be  a  general  trend  of  effort  reduction  across  fleets  and  also  widespread  evidence  of  fishermen in many countries reverting to more fuel efficient methods in an attempt to  reduce  operating  costs  and  maintain  economic  viability.  There  are  also  targeted  de‐ commissioning  schemes  now  in  operation  in  France,  Belgium,  Ireland,  Netherlands  and the Basque region of Spain, although it is still too early to tell what effects these  schemes will have on overall effort levels. Specific changes in fleet dynamics include  the following:  •

Effort  associated  with  French  purse  seine  vessels  targeting  anchovy  and  bluefin  tuna  has  transferred  to  targeting  red  mullet,  squid  and  whiting  with Danish Seines in the Bay of Biscay. A similar trend has been observed  in Ireland, with a switch from demersal trawling for monkfish and megrim  to Danish Seining for roundfish. It is estimated that this has increased the  Irish Seine net activity from 5 to 10 vessels in the space of one year 



French trawlers targeting whiting which traditionally operate in VIId have  switched effort into IVb due to reduced catch rates in VIId and to reduce  fuel consumption by decreasing the number of individual trips but increas‐ ing duration. 



The UK beam trawlers have reduced fishing activity levels due to high fuel  prices. Many are now focussing on scalloping as opposed to fish. 



There  has  been  a  shift  for  Scottish  vessels  from  using  100mm‐110mm  for  whitefish on the west coast ground (area VI) to 80mm Nephrops codends in  the North Sea (area IV). Fuel costs are a major driver, in this and all fisher‐ ies. 



There is a gradual shift from beam trawling on flatfish to twin trawling on  other species e.g. gurnards, and Nephrops, etc. in the Dutch fleet. A number  of beam trawlers decided to shift to other techniques such as outrigging or  fly‐shooting  in  the  British  Channel.  Caused  by  TAC  limitations  of  plaice  and sole and rising fuel costs. 



At  least  five  large  Icelandic  stern  trawlers  have  switched  from  single  to  twin rig trawling targeting cod and haddock. 



As a result of increasing fuel prices several large Faroese ʹDeep‐Seaʹ trawl‐ ers have plans to move to pair trawling. 



In France there have been increasing attempts to develop pot and trap fish‐ ing particularly in non trawling areas and deep slope and reefs.  

Technology Creep The effects of technological creep are still evident in many fisheries but the concept of  negative creep reported in 2006 and 2007 is now becoming more prevalent as vessels  try to reduce operating costs to counteract high fuel prices. Most technological creep  observed  has  concentrated  on  reducing  the  drag  of  fishing  gear.  Several  vessels  in  Iceland have begun tests with dynex rope warps instead of conventional wire warp.  The savings in drag are estimated at 20–30% although whether the potential fuel sav‐ ings can offset the increased costs for fitting out with dynex is unknown at this stage.  Net  designs  incorporating  T90  netting  or  low  drag  high  tenacity  twines  have  also  been tested in a number of countries.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 29

Technical Conservation Measures In a number of fisheries, there is some evidence of voluntary uptake of gear mitiga‐ tion measures. The drivers for uptake are either regulatory i.e. as a means of achiev‐ ing increased fishing opportunities or economic through improved fish quality. There  has also been evidence of some vessels adopting more selective gear as a way of im‐ proving  public  perception.  This  is  particularly  noticeable  in  the  Netherlands  beam  trawl fisheries. Specific examples include:  •

In  the  Blue  whiting  fishery,  both  Icelandic  and  Faroese  vessels  are  using  flexible  grids  with  55  mm  between  bars  to  exclude  cod  and  saithe  from  catches  of  blue  whiting.  Trials  with  this  approach  being  conducted  in  Norway,  no  uptake  yet.  There  are  predominantly  large  cod  and  saithe  in  the areas where the Blue whiting is caught, thus the grid is believed to re‐ duce bycatch of those species by >90%. 



The Dutch beam trawl fleet is sensitive to the bad reputation of beam trawl  and this is stimulating research into selective nets and reduced bottom im‐ pact. Combined research activities were started in 2007, mostly catch com‐ parison  experiments  but  there  is  an  industry  focus  to  solve  this  image  problem. 



Belgium  beam  trawlers  operating  in  VIIg  are  reported  to  be  using  larger  mesh (150mm) belly panels in order to reduce retention of weed and other  benthos. Belgium fishermen’s organisations are promoting the use of ben‐ thic drop out panels and full square mesh cod‐ends and uptake is likely to  steadily  increase.  One  vessel  is  currently  using  these  devices  voluntarily  but other vessels are scheduled to adopt these modifications during 2008.  



Encouraged by access rights, Basque vessels which target mixed demersal  species  in  VIIIabd  close  to  the  French  coast,  are  voluntarily  using  square  mesh panels to reduce discards. 



During the first Quarter of 2008 a “day at sea” in Kattegat without the grid  was  counted  as  2.5  days.  This  has  further  increased  the  incentives  to  use  the sorting grid to the point were 80% of all Nephrops landings in the first  quarter of 2008 were caught with sorting grids (20% previous years). 



A large number of 110mm SMPs have been bought in the first months of  2008  by  the  prawn  fleet  so  that  they  qualify  for  the  basic  Conservation  Credits scheme. Probably affects most (~80%) of the fleet.  



Pelagic  vessels  in  Scotland  and  Ireland  have  been  fitting  escape  grids/panels.  These  are  believed  to  allow  release  of  juvenile  mackerel,  horse  mackerel  and  herring.  Recent  trials  gave  equivocal  results.  Uptake  around 50% in Irish fleet and 10% in Scottish fleets. Possible reduced mor‐ tality on recruiting year classes, but no data on survival rates from escap‐ ing  fish  is  available  and  therefore  could  be  a  source  of  unaccounted  mortality.  

Ecosystem Effects Evidence  of  discarding  has  been  observed  in  a  number  of  fisheries  2007/2008.  The  motivations  for  discarding  are  a  mixture  of  regulatory  or  economically  driven.  Spe‐ cific examples include:  •

In Ireland there has been widespread of cod in 2007 and 2008 in ICES Ar‐ eas VIIb‐k due to early exhaustion of the cod quota.  

 

30 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Similarly in Ireland there has been a considerable increase in the quantities  of small nephrops on the Smalls grounds in 2007 and 2008 leading to very  high landings by boats from the East coast with a high proportion of tails  to  whole  nephrops.  There  are  a  number  of  boats  (up  to  10  vessels)  that  have participated in this fishery but do not tail due to low crew numbers  and this has lead to high discarding/upgrading.  



Potential discard problems are also reported following the introduction of  the  5%  bycatch  limits  for  spurdog  on  west  coast  and  North  Sea  grounds.  They can be encountered in large congregations but it is almost impossible  for  vessels  to  identify  them  using  sonar  etc  so  they  are  difficult  to  avoid  and are therefore caught and discarded.  



The Swedish Baltic cod trawl fishery has been concentrating effort close to  coastal  areas,  both  due  to  a  high  abundance  of  fish  and  high  fuel  prices.  This  costal  area  has  been  considered  to  be  an  important  nursing  area  for  predominately juvenile cod and discarding maybe high 

Ghost fishing in the deepwater fisheries in Areas IV, VI and VII remains a problem.  There  are  reports  of  discarded  longlines  and  gill  nets  along  the  Scottish  west  coast  deep water grounds and in the northern North Sea.   In  Iceland  a  number  of  gillnetters  have  shifted  over  to  longlines  as  a  result  of  pres‐ sures over bycatch of seabirds and small cetaceans. The level of bycatch is not known  but is felt to be quite high given the shifts in fishing method  Predation of fish catches by Grey seals from gillnet/tangle net fisheries has become an  increasing problem on the south coast of Ireland. Many inshore gillnet fishermen are  considering shifting into other fisheries as the problems have become so bad.  A number of measures have been continued to be taken by the beam trawl fleets in  Belgium and Netherlands. In Netherlands there are reports of voluntary use of longi‐ tudinal release holes in the lower panel of the trawl, which open when nets are filled  with benthos, and also Benthic Release Panels. Similar initiatives are ongoing in Bel‐ gium.  In  Norway,  one  vessel  has  carried  out  experiments  using pelagic  trawl  doors  fished off the seabed (approx. 5 m) with a clump (weight) connected 50 m behind the  doors to ensure proper bottom contact. This method is being used to target gadoids  in the Barents Sea but with reduced seabed contact.   Development of New Fisheries As has become the trend in recent years there are very few reports of new fisheries  being developed but a few specific examples are reported are as follows: 

 



A new fishery has developed in Iceland for sea cucumber. This new fishery  has  not  significantly  removed  effort  from  other  fisheries.  But  after  a  col‐ lapse  in  the  scallop  stock  (Breiðafjörður  2003  Chlamys  islandica)  some  smaller fish boats previously targeting scallops have now shifted to the cu‐ cumber fisheries 



Up to eight Irish pelagic vessels have continued to fish for boarfish (Capros  aper)  during  Q4  2007  and  Q1  2008.  Two  vessels  fished  for  this  species  in  2006 and approximately 8 vessels in 2007.  



There  has  been  an  increase  by  Dutch  vessels  in  Nephrops  fisheries  using  twin trawls. Outrigger trawls are also replacing beam trawls, or flyshoot‐ ing  (seining)  mainly  for  non‐quota  species  such  as  red  mullet  and  cuttle‐ fish. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



| 31

Squid fishery in Moray Firth continues to develop when species available  on grounds. There has been increased catches of squid reported at Rockall  in Q2 of 2008 

11.1.3 Information for Individual Assessment Working Groups

Specific information relating to different areas and fisheries by Assessment Working  Groups and other Expert Groups are detailed in Annex 8. Information is provided for  the following WG’s and also GFCM:  AMAWGC  WGNSSK  WGNSDS  WGSSDS/WGHMM  WGDEEP  WGBFAS 

WGMHSA  HAWG  WGNPBW  WGECO  WGMME  GFCM 

11.1.4 Recommendations

1 ) The topic group will continue to collate this information on an annual ba‐ sis, based on the issues related above and subject to further revision of the  questionnaire and better quantification of the information where possible.   2 ) WGFTFB  should  continue  to  receive  feedback  from  the  different  Expert  Group’s  and  AWAWGC,  to  assess  the  usefulness  of  the  information  sup‐ plied and also target specific areas that are identified of particular impor‐ tance to individual assessment WG’s. WGFTFB are committed to assisting  in the provision of information to the new Benchmark workshops planned  for winter 2008/2009.  3 ) WGFTFB  will  expand  the  provision  of  information  to  other  relevant  groups such as GFCM in the Mediterranean.  

12

ToR c): Static Gear Selectivity Manual

12.1 General Overview The ICES Static Gear manual has a history extending back to 1988 when it was first  suggested to formulate it. The current draft has described procedures for gillnet selec‐ tivity but procedures for longlines and pot selectivity are not well developed and this  has meant that the manual has not been completed. Given the increasing importance  of all types of static gears and particularly pots it is important that this manual is now  finished. A topic group will be formed to work by correspondence and to meet and  discuss and agreed an Action Plan timetable for completion of the Manual at the 2008  meeting  of  FTFB.  The  topic  group  will  identify  gaps  in  the  knowledge  and  review  available literature pertaining to the measurement of the selectivity of all static gears.  This topic group met from the 22–24 April in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. Nine WGFTFB  members participated and Rene Holst from Denmark held a conference call with the  Topic  Group.  Following  their  discussions  the  convener  reported  back  to  plenary  WGFTFB.  12.1.1 Terms of Reference

The topic group had the following ToRs:  i )

Review the current draft of the Static Gear Manual; 

 

32 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

ii )

Review available literature on the measurement of selectivity of all Static  Gears and identify gaps in the knowledge; and 

iii )

Agree a structure for the completion of the manual and identify a draft‐ ing committee to complete this task. 

12.1.2 General Issues 12.1.2.1 Actions Taken

The  Topic  Group  identified  three  different  gillnet  manuals,  either  complete  docu‐ ments or draft. In addition to the draft ICES manual that dates back to 1998, there are  the following two documents:   i )

Manual  on  estimation  of  selectivity  for  gillnet  and  longline  gears  in  abundance surveys. Holger Hovgård (Danish Institute for Fisheries Re‐ search,  Charlottenlund,  Denmark)  and  Hans  Lassen  (International  Council  for  the  Exploration  of  the  Sea  Copenhagen,  Denmark)  FAO  FISHERIES TECHNICAL PAPER  397. (2002) 

ii )

Manual  For  Gillnet  Selectivity.  René  Holst,  Niels  Madsen,  Paulo  Fonseca, Thomas Moth‐Poulsen and Aidia Campos. EU, (1997). Selectiv‐ ity  of  gillnets  in  the  North  Sea,  English  Channel  and  Bay  of  Biscay.  AIR2–93–1122. 61 pp + Appendices. 

As a first step the Group considered these three manuals of existing static gear selec‐ tivity  manuals  and  identified  the  strengths,  weaknesses  and  gaps  in  knowledge.  None  of  the  manuals  were  considered  a  “finished”  document  and  the  statistical  analysis in all three needed to be updated. There was very little information on other  static gears such as longlines and pots and any of the analysis included seemed less  than robust.   12.1.2.2 Agreed Plan for Completion of manual

Having considered the relevant documentation the Group agreed a plan for comple‐ tion of the ICES manual. The ICES document was felt to be 80% complete but on the  basis of the information available it was felt pertinent to restrict the manual to static  nets only i.e. gillnets, trammel nets and tangle nets. This was not seen as a major issue  as the measurement of selectivity of longlines and pots is a developing science. It was  also identified that a lot of the relevant information needed to complete the manual  was contained in the EU project but it would be necessary to write to the EU for per‐ mission to use and update this information so as not to breach copyright laws.   With regard to the overall content of the manual the main issues identified were as  follows: 

 

i )

The original text needs some editing to improve the grammar. 

ii )

The Statistical methods need updating. 

iii )

The boundaries and applicability of the manual need to be detailed i.e.  the methods should not be used for species where the selectivity is not  well defined (fish with spikes). 

iv )

 Graphics and diagrams are required. 

v )

It  would  be  very  useful  to  add  case  studies,  documenting  relevant  ex‐ periments and analysis carried out. 

vi )

The finished document will need to be peer reviewed before publication. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 33

12.1.2.3 Provisional timetable for completion of work

The  Topic  Group  outlined  a  provisional  timetable  for  completion  of  the  manual  as  follows:  •

May (Chair FTFB) – Contact EU (permission) 



May‐July (Italy and Belgium) – review recent literature for any new issues,  methods (i.e. paint etc). 



Italy will consolidate findings and advise UK and Denmark 



July – Italy to supply UK with Italian case study 



July – France to supply graphics to UK 



July – Italy to search for suitable case study involving hanging ratios (if not  found use Danish case study on twine diameter) 



July‐ Sept – Denmark to update statistics and incorporate case studies 



July  ‐  Sept  ‐  UK  to  draft  final  report  and  distribute  to  Italy,  Denmark,  France, Belgium 



Oct – France, Belgium and Denmark to return draft with comments 



Nov – UK to amend report and be offered to FAO for external review  



Dec – Review complete(subject to offer being accepted by FAO) 



2009 – Consider the possibility of a joint FAO/ICES publication noting that  issues of publication coats and copyright ownership need to be discussed. 

This  was  presented  and  agreed  at  plenary  as  the  best  way  forward,  although  there  were  some  reservations  about  not  including  longlines  and  pots  in  the  manual  but  given the information is incomplete and to include this would be a major task that in  the opinion of the Topic Group could not be completed in a reasonable timeframe.  12.1.3 List of Participants

Andy Revill  Gianna Fabi  Fabio Grati  Jacques Sacchi  Dirk Verhaeghe  Kris van Creaynest  Peter Munro  Frank Chopin  Jonathen Dickson  Rene Holst 

CEFAS  ISMAR‐CNR  ISMAR‐CNR  IFREMER  ILVO  ILVO  NOAA  FAO  FAR  DTU‐Aqua 

UK  Italy  Italy  France  Belgium  Belgium  Alaska  Italy  Philippines  Denmark (by phone) 

12.1.4 Recommendations

1 ) WGFTFB recommend that the Topic Group work to the timetable outlined  to  produce  the  manual.  This  will  be  presented  to  WGFTFB  at  the  2009  meeting.  12.2 Individual Presentation 12.2.1 Size selectivity of basket traps for the gastropod Nassarius mutabilis in the Adriatic Sea

Gianna Fabi and Fabio Grati  

 

34 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Istituto di Scienze Marine – CNR, L.go Fiera della Pesca, 260125 Ancona, Italy   Abstract

Fishing of Nassarius mutabilis is performed along the coast of the central and northern  Adriatic Sea from autumn to spring by small‐scale vessels using basket traps with a  19‐mm mesh size. This fishery usually gives higher income than any other set gear,  but in the last years landings have shown a general decrease. Management measures  such as Minimum Landing Size (shell height = 20 mm) and mesh opening of the sieve  used to sort individuals larger than MLS are currently enforced. Nevertheless, large  amounts of small specimens are commonly caught and sold.   In order to avoid the catch of undersized individuals, the selectivity of basket traps  was evaluated in a comparative study. Three experimental nets (colour white; mesh  openings 23, 26, 28‐mm) were fished in conjunction with two commercial nets (mesh  opening  19‐mm)  of  different  colours  (black  and  white)  and  one  control  net  (colour  white;  mesh  opening  5‐mm).  One  hundred  and  twenty  traps  were  randomly  ar‐ ranged in one set deployed on a muddy bottom (10 m depth) and hauled five times in  September  2004.  According  to  commercial  fishing  practice,  traps  were  baited  with  horse mackerel and soak time was 24 hours. Size selectivity was estimated with the  SELECT  method  commonly  adopted  for  trouser  trawl  experiments  using  CC2000  software (Constat, 2000).   Selectivity  parameters  were  estimated  for  a  pool  of  curves,  but  the  logistic  model  gave  the  best  results.  Goodness  of  fit  test  based  on  model  deviance  gave  high  p‐ values in all cases, being the lowest one 0.74 for the 19‐mm trap (black).  H50 increased from 15.9 mm for the white 19‐mm trap up to 24.1 mm for the 28‐mm  one. Around 3,000 specimens were caught with the control traps, 988 with the black  19‐mm traps, 576 with the white 19‐mm traps, 263 with the 23‐mm traps, 114 with the  26‐mm traps and 7 with the 28‐mm ones. Percentage of individuals larger than MLS  gradually increased from 14% in the control 5‐mm traps up to 100% in the 26‐mm and  28‐mm  ones.  Comparison  between  black  and  white  19‐mm  traps  did  not  show  any  significant difference, both in terms of L50 and of catch yields. These results indicated  that  the  19‐mm  mesh  commonly  used  by  fishermen  is  not  adequate  to  sustainably  exploit  N.  mutabilis  due  to  the  large  amount  of  undersized  specimens  in  catches,  while the 23‐mm mesh represented a good compromise between commercial fishing  yields and protection of undersize animals.  Discussion

The author was asked how the small Nassarius were thought to be escaping from the  pots but the author could not provide any explanation. It was stated that in a Cana‐ dian study no improvement in mesh size selectivity could be achieved for whelk pots  where the catch sizes were very high and the species exhibited similar behaviour. It  was explained that in the present study catch for 500 pots were only about 100 kg and  this relatively low catch rates was felt to be the likely cause of difference in the selec‐ tivity achieved. The question was asked as to whether the escapees survived but this  was unknown and the main reason for trying to increase selectivity was a motivation  to increase efficiency through reduced sorting times. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

13

| 35

ToR (d) Mitigation Technologies for Protected Species

13.1 General Overview This ToR was proposed by Alessandro Lucchetti and Antonello Sala of CNR‐ISMAR  at the WGFTFB meeting in Dublin 2007. The group worked by correspondence dur‐ ing  2007/2008  and  met  at  FTFB  in  2008  in  Tórshavn,  Faroe  Islands.  An  overview  of  this topic and a paper on ‘Turtle Excluder Devices Experiments in the Central Adri‐ atic Sea’ were presented at plenary by Alessandro Lucchetti.   13.1.1 Terms of Reference

The Topic Group addressed the following ToRs:   •

Identify  fisheries  where  technical  mitigation  measures  have  been  intro‐ duced to reduce the bycatch of protected species; and 



Review  the  efficacy  of  these  technical  mitigation  measures  introduced  to  reduce the bycatch of protected species such as small cetaceans or turtles.  

13.1.2 Identification of technical mitigation measures

Prior  to  WGFTFB,  the  ICES  Study  Group  for  Bycatch  of  Portected  Species  (SGBYC)  had produced a “Compendium of Mitigation Methods deployed to minimise bycatch  of protected species” at their meeting in January 2008 (See Section 3.6). This table was  considered  by  the  WGFTFB  Topic  Group  and  additional  information  incorporated  from FTFB members, including the participants from FAO REBYC (Reduction of By‐ cacth in Tropical Shrimp Trawling) project. The group also tried to identify technical  or practical difficulties associated with mitigation measures which were deemed ex‐ perimental by SGBYC.   Based on the information gathered by the Topic Group, the table was revised accord‐ ingly as shown in Annex 9. Table 6 below summarises the entries broken down into  measures  currently  legislated  for,  being  used  voluntarily  or  purely  experimental  by  broad species categories as follows:   •

Small Cetaceans 



Whales 



Pinipeds 



Sea Turtles 



Seabirds 



Other large fish species such as sharks and rays 

 

36 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Table 6. Summary table of mitigation measure by species.  S PECIES C ATEGORY

Small Cetaceans 

L EGISLATION

VOLUNTARY

USE

EXPERIMENTAL





15 

Whales 

 





Pinnipeds 



 



Sea Turtles 

13 

 



Seabirds 







Other Large Fish  Species 



 



It was agreed that this table was extremely informative and accordingly should b be  circulated to all WGFTFB members for further updating. The updated version would  then be forwarded to SGBYC And other relevant Expert Groups.  The  Topic  Group  also  considered  the  specific  case  of  loggerhead  turtle  bycatch  in  Mediterranean  fisheries  on  the  basis  of  a  study  presented  by  Alessandro  Lucchetti.  The full case study is presented in Annex 10. Data on the level of bycatch of protected  species in the Mediterranean is extremely sporadic but given the number of fisheries  with potential impacts the levels are undoubtedly significant. The specific case study  presented  cites  estimates  of  more  than  60,000  turtles  caught  annually  in  trawl,  longline  and  static  gear  fisheries  with  mortality  rates  of  individuals  caught  ranging  from  10–50%.  The  actual  catches  are  anticipated  to  be  far  higher  given  that  many  countries do not report any bycatch. The report details research carried out with dif‐ ferent  mitigation  measures  for  trawls  and  longlines  and  recommends  the  need  for  further research and enhanced data collection programmes to provide a better under‐ standing of the scale of the problem. The use of TEDS, modified to match  the catch  composition in Mediterranean bottom trawl fisheries, as well as simple gear modifi‐ cations  in  longline  fisheries  such  as  using  mackerel  instead  of  squid,  deeper  setting  and the use of circle hooks are recommended for further investigation, given they are  proven mitigation technologies in other parts of the world.   13.1.3 Assessment of efficacy of the technical measures

The Topic Group considered the response by SGBYC to the following TOR:   “Review  of  methods  and  technologies  that  have  been  used  to  minimise  bycatch  of  species  of  interest, including methods that have failed”.   This  report  identified  that  in  a  number  of  fisheries,  mitigation  measures  to  reduce  bycatch of protected species (cetaceans, pinnipeds, turtles and large fish species) had  been introduced (e.g. new type of hooks, TEDS, acoustic deterrents etc.) and in some  cases there was evidence that bycatch had been reduced, but little or no attempts had  been made to quantify this reduction.   The ToR addressed by SGBYC was seen by WGFTFB as a pre‐cursor to the work to be  completed in attempting to develop a framework for such an assessment. The Topic  Group considered the report by SGBYC and concluded that it was very comprehen‐ sive and had identified all elements that should be addressed when introducing miti‐ gation measures for minimise protected species bycatch.  The  Topic  Group  then  considered  the  findings  in  the  context  of  the  methodology  used by WGFTFB in reviewing the efficacy of recent (2003) technical measures intro‐ duced into the North Sea C. crangon fishery (Sieve nets / grids) aimed at reducing dis‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 37

carding of juvenile whitefish (ICES, 2007). This assessment considered social, biologi‐ cal  and  economic  factors  along  with  technical  issues  in  the  design  and  use  of  the  technical measure.   The Topic Group attempted to apply this methodology to the case study on logger‐ head turtle bycatch in Mediterranean fisheries to determine whether it was possible  to  assess  the  efficacy  of  potential  measures  that  could  be  used  in  these  fisheries.  It  was concluded, however, that given only limited information was available it was not  possible  to  carry  out  the  assessment.  The  Topic  Group  considered  more  established  mitigation  technologies  such  as  acoustic  deterrent  devices  into  gillnet  fisheries  and  the use of TEDS in shrimp trawl fisheries but the data required on levels of bycatch,  uptake of the devices and the potential impact of the measures on the protected spe‐ cies stock are not at a current level of resolution to allow an assessment to be made. It  was  felt  unlikely  that  in  the  short  term  that  such  an  analysis  would  be  possible  for  any mitigation measure for the reduction of bycatch of protected species.   13.1.4 List of Participants

Alessandro Lucchetti  Dominic Rihan  Håkan Vesterberg  Huseyin Ozbilgin  Sven Gunnar Lunneryl  Pascal Larnaud 

ISMAR‐CNR  BIM  Swedish Board of Fisheries  Mersin University  Swedish Board of Fisheries  IFREMER 

Italy  Ireland  Sweden  Turkey  Sweden  France 

13.1.5 Conclusions

1 ) WGFTFB acknowledges the work carried out by ICES SGBYC in develop‐ ing the table of mitigation measures and has sought to update this table.  2 )  WGFTFB  concludes  that  the  impact  of  fisheries  on  Loggerhead  turtle  needs  to  be  considered  urgently  given the  scale  of  the  problem.  Research  into  the  applicability  of  proven  mitigation  technologies  to  reduce  the  by‐ catch should be supported.  3 ) WGFTFB have been unable to use the  methodology developed in 2008 to  assess  the  efficacy  of  mitigation  measures  for  protected  species. WGFTFB  conclude that this methodology is data dependent and for most protected  species bycatch issues such data does not exist currently.  13.1.6 Recommendations

1 ) WGFTFB  recommend  that  the  Compendium  of  Mitigation  Methods  de‐ ployed to minimise bycatch of protected species developed by SGBYC and  expanded on by WGFTFB should continued to be updated as information  on work being undertaken globally becomes available.  2 ) WGFTFB  recommend  that  GFCM  encourage  Mediterranean  States  insti‐ gate data collection programmes to provide a better understanding of the  bycatch issues in Mediterranean fisheries, particularly in non‐EU countries.  3 ) WGFTFB  recommend  that  research  in  the  Mediterranean  on  mitigation  technologies be carried out under commercial conditions and include con‐ sideration of socio‐economic effects of introducing such technologies.  4 ) WGFTFB  recommend  as  a  matter  of  priority  that  GFCM  instigate  further  development  and  testing  of  Turtle  Excluder  Devices  in  trawl  fisheries  in 

 

38 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

the  Central Adriatic,  Tunisia and  the North‐east  Mediterranean given  the  level of turtle bycatch in these areas.  5 ) WGFTFB  recommend  that  GFCM  instigate  research  and  pilot  projects  to  ascertain whether simple modifications to longline gears such as the use of  circle  hooks,  different  bait  types  and  setting  depths  used  extensively  in  other  parts  of  the  world  e.g.  US  and  Hawaii  to  reduce  turtle  bycatch  are  appropriate in the Mediterranean.  13.2 Individual Presentations 13.2.1 Turtle Excluder Devices Experiments in the Central Adriatic Sea

Alessandro Lucchetti, Antonello Sala, Marco Affronte   CNR, Italy  Abstract

There are three turtle species in the Mediterranean Sea: the leatherback (Dermochelys  coriacea), the green (Chelonia midas) and the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Logger‐ head sea turtles are listed as endangered in the Red List of Threatened Species of the  International  Union  for  Conservation  of  Nature  and  Natural  Resources  (IUCN).  In  the  Mediterranean  Sea,  they  represent  the  most  abundant  species  of  marine  turtles.  The Central‐Northern Adriatic Sea, for its shallow waters (<100 m) and rich benthic  communities  is  considered  one  of  the  most  important  foraging  areas  in  the  whole  Mediterranean area for the loggerhead turtle population during the demersal phase  of their life cycle.   In  the  Mediterranean  Sea,  turtles  are  usually  threatened  by  longline  and  driftnet  fleets, very often used illegally. Nevertheless, in the Central‐Northern Adriatic Sea a  growing number of sea turtles are accidentally caught by bottom trawlers in the last  number  of  years.  Few  unofficial  observations  report  that  most  of  the  incidental  catches occur in late winter and spring in coastal areas. Incidental catch probably oc‐ cur during towing operations when turtles are foraging on the bottom. It is estimated  that in this area more than 4000 turtles per year are caught by trawls. One of the most  important gear modifications used globally to protect sea turtle, especially the juve‐ nile  and  sub‐adult  size  classes,  is  the  use  of  Turtle  Excluder  Devices  (TEDs).  TEDs  actually  represent  a  management  measure  widely  employed  in  several  areas  of  the  World but no specific testing in Italian waters is recorded.   There  are  a  variety  of  hard  TED  designs  available  for  fishermen  but  generally  it  is  very  difficult  to  introduce  new  technical  solutions,  taking  into  account  that  innova‐ tions  can  be  easily  accepted  only  if  economic  losses  in  terms  of  marketable  fish  catches  are  insignificant.  During  the  LIFE  project  TARTANET,  we  projected  and  tested at sea five different TEDs with the aim of finding the best way mitigation tech‐ nologies for Italian waters. The first two TEDs tested at sea were a simple oval grid  type, made of aluminium and plastic respectively. They were not satisfactory because  of  the  losses  of  many  commercial  species  and  therefore  they  were  felt  not  commer‐ cially acceptable in the short term.  Two  other  experimental  low‐cost  and  semi‐rigid  grids  (TARTEDs),  similar  in  shape  but made first in plastic and then in a composite rubber‐material, were tested. They  were a fixed‐angle TED with a single hoop used to strengthen the TED frame and to  maintain TED angle. The hoop and the deflector grid were sewn to the trawl exten‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 39

sion in order to ʺfixʺ the angle of the TED in the trawl. In fact the angle at which the  TED operated during towing (30° to 55° from the horizontal) is an important factor in  preventing fish loss.   Both  the  TARTEDs  were  very  efficient  because  they  allowed  the  release  of  large  quantities of debris (plastic materials, wood, stones, etc). This characteristic positively  affected  the  fish  quality  of  the  commercial  catch  portion.  Moreover,  the  losses  of  commercial  species  were  insignificant  in  most  tows.  In  order  to  evaluate  the  effec‐ tiveness of the TARTEDs in releasing turtle‐shape bodies, some tests were performed  using a simulate “turtle” using a container 40X40 cm deployed along the towing di‐ rection. All tests showed positive results and all the waste materials included the con‐ tainer  and  even  a  carapace  of  a  dead  turtle  was  released  from  the  turtle  escape  opening.   Finally,  comparative  sea  trials  were  carried  out,  testing  a  traditional  Super  Shooter  TED  and  the  semi‐rigid  TARTED.  Fishermen  were  very  interested  in  testing  this  technical  solution  especially  as  debris  separation  grid.  During  winter  they  usually  exploit  typical  fishing  grounds  of  the  Central  Adriatic  Sea,  characterized  by  a  great  amount  of  sea  cucumbers  (Holothuroidea).  These  areas,  which  represent  an  impor‐ tant  habitat  for  several  commercial  species,  are  actually  overexploited  by  trawlers  and the use of TEDs should avoid the catch and the death of sea cucumbers allowing  the protection of this typical fishing grounds.   In conclusion, the two low‐cost TARTEDs, compared to the Super shooter TED, were  easier to rig and they seem to be more efficient in releasing debris with insignificant  economic  losses,  furthermore  the  characteristics  of  the  materials  of  the  semi‐rigid  TARTEDs  make  the  handling  easier  during  hauling.  The  simulation  experiments  suggest they are also effective at realising turtles from trawls.  Discussion

The scale of the problem in the Mediterranean as presented was commented on by a  number  of  participants  and  the  importance  of  the  need  to  develop  mitigation  tech‐ nologies for all gear methods was emphasised. Experiences with longline fisheries in  the US were highlighted including the use of circle hooks and deep setting of longli‐ nes. These methods while useful are not 100% reliable. 

14

ToR e): Request form WGEF See section 3.1.1. 

15

ToR f): Ad hoc Topic Group on Shrimp Trawl Efficiency

15.1 Request In the NIPAG report of 2006 the following recommendation was made:  “During the NIPAG assessments in 2006 there was a discussion of the use of double  trawls in the shrimp fishery and how best to represent the effort of these trawls. They  may not exert twice the effort as a single trawl. STACREC noted the importance of this  issue and encouraged Contracting Parties to study the efficiency of twin shrimp trawls.  STACREC noted that for bottom trawls one factor in standardizing effort is to count  the number of meshes in the circumference of the trawl opening. Given the importance  of estimates of effort to shrimp assessments STACREC recommended that the appropri‐

 

40 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

ate method to estimate effort from twin trawls (bottom and midwater) be referred to the  ICES Fishing Technology Working Group”.  STACREC (June 2007:80) and the Scientific Council of the NAFO/ICES Pandaleus As‐ sessment  Group  (October‐November  2007:218)  responded  to  the  request  of  the  NI‐ PAG (SCS 06/27, p. 47) to forward the question of the efficiency of single and double  trawls to the April 2008 meeting of the ICES/FAO WGFTFB. The request received was  as follows:  “During deliberations of various shrimp stocks it was noted that twin trawls, and in  some  cases  triple  trawls,  were  being  utilized  for  the  improvement  of  catch  quality  rather  than  catch  rate.  It  was  pointed  out  that  the  physical  attributes  of  some  twin  trawls (e.g. the number of meshes in the circumference) may not be too different from  single trawls. NIPAG considered that further investigations should be conducted to  address this as it is could be very informative in interpreting standardized catch rate  indices.  This  would  include  investigations  of  the  use  of  twin  and  triple  trawls  in  other fisheries as well, for example Greenland halibut directed fisheries, where their  deployment may be used to improve catch rate rather than catch quality”.  This request was forwarded to ICES‐FAO WGFTFB in 2007. WGFTFB has addressed  this  request  by  soliciting  input  from  a  number  of  specific  experts  with  information  and/or  comments  received  from  Iceland,  Canada,  Norway,  Faroe  Islands  and  UK‐ Scotland. The Chair of WGFTFB has taken this information and produced this docu‐ ment  as  an  attempt  at  addressing  the  specific  request  and  the  findings  and  recom‐ mendations were agreed at the WGFTFB meeting in April 2008 in the Faroes Islands.  It should be noted that the views expressed do not necessarily reflect fully the views  of all the contributors.   15.2 Shrimp Trawl Evolution The  fishery  for  Pandalus  shrimp  has  been  in  existence  for  a  large  number  of  years  beginning in Iceland in the 1930’s in inshore waters, and moving to the offshore fish‐ eries  in  the  1970’s.  The  trawls  used  have  increased  in  size  from  simple  two  panel  trawls to large four panel nets fished as twin or even triple rigs, designed to take ac‐ count of diurnal variations in shrimp behaviour. In the past 20 years or so, stronger  netting  materials  have  been  introduced,  vessels  have  shifted  from  steel  bobbins  to  rubber rockhoppers and in general, the trawl design has undergone considerably re‐ finement to maximise efficiency.   In 1991, after a visit to the Danish fisheries, an Icelandic Nephrops skipper succeeded  with towing two trawls simultaneously, increasing the shrimp catch significantly. In  1993, an Icelandic factory trawler, ‘Sunna SI’ managed to fish with two shrimp trawls.  In  her  first  trip,  she  had  to  go  ashore  for  more  crew  to  cope  with  the  increased  catches.  Since  then,  most  large  shrimp  trawlers  have  changed  to  twin  trawling.  In  Norway,  the  first  vessels  using  twin  trawls  entered  the  fishery  in  1996.  Since  then,  efficiency has increased continuously, and in 2002 approximately 35 Norwegian ves‐ sels had the technology to use double or even triple trawls. Since 2002, the majority of  the yield is taken by twin trawl.  Modern  shrimp  trawls  are  characterised  by  having  wider  horizontal  spreads  than  traditional  trawls  of  a  similar  size.  This  is  largely  to  maximise  swept  area  of  the  groundgear and also allows towing in areas of rough ground without damage to the  trawl.  There  are  also  specially  designed  trawls  with high  vertical  openings  shrimp  trawls suitable for night fishing in areas where shrimp are lifting off the bottom. 2 d 3  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 41

15.3 General Comments It  is  important  in  the  first  instance  to  point  out  that  all  shrimp species  like  Pandalus  borealis  are  captured  by  a  pure  filtering  process.  Therefore,  the  area  swept  by  the  small meshes (< 50mm) is what determines the capture efficiency. Horizontal opening  is thus more important than filtered volume with respect to catch volumes. Wingend  spread is more important for shrimp trawl efficiency than a high vertical opening and  consequently using circumference of the trawl is not a particularly accurate measure  of efficiency for shrimp trawls.  Given the fundamental differences in the catching process, comparisons between sin‐ gle and twin trawls for fish species and shrimp is not considered by WGFTFB to be  very  relevant as  herding  efficiency  by  sweeps  can  very  much  influence  the  capture  efficiency  of  fish.  Long  sweeps  in  a  single  trawl  rigging  can  compensate  for  twin  trawls for many fish species but not necessarily for shrimp. The overarching conclu‐ sion is that if the same size of trawl is used as a single or twin trawl, the twin trawler  will almost double the catch although there is evidence of single trawlers having the  same  towing power  as  a  twin  rig  vessel  often  increases  the  trawl size  including  the  fishing line length, and can catch more than half of the twin trawler. Measurements in  Canada showed in comparison with a single trawl, by using the twin trawl method  the swept volume increased from 106m² to 193m² an increase of 82%. Swept area in‐ creased from 1,739m² to 2,067m², an increase of 19%.   The relationship between wingend spread and shrimp catch is further borne out by a  study  carried  out  in  Newfoundland  (DeLouche  et  al.,  2005).  This  study  provided  valuable  information  on  shrimp  distribution  and  size  in  the  bottom  waters.  It  also  raised questions as to the trawl gear designs that are currently being used commer‐ cially  to  harvest  northern  shrimp.  The  results  from  this  work  clearly  demonstrated  that the upper 1/3 of the typical trawl that is used to harvest shrimp is not an effective  harvesting tool. In this study it was found imperative that 100% of the swept area of  the trawl be actively catching shrimp. Based on the findings of this report any trawl  design must have a reduced vertical opening and a higher horizontal spread. Essen‐ tially  trawl  design  should  look  at  maintaining  mouth  area  by  reducing  the  vertical  opening of the trawl and increasing the wingspread. By doing this the trawl will now  be targeting shrimp where they are known to exist in high densities. With this design  it is possible that more energy may required to tow the trawl, thereby burning more  fuel, but fishing trips may be reduced by several tows as well, thereby saving on fuel.  In Norwegian shrimp fisheries there is a tendency towards increasing the fishing line  length and to use larger meshes in the upper panels. Among the larger shrimp vessels  there are no single trawlers left although in the coastal shrimp fisheries some vessels  are  still  operating  a  single  trawl.  There  are  currently  three  Norwegian  trawlers  are  presently operating three trawls.  15.4 Icelandic Effort Data Having said that shrimp trawl efficiency is related more to wingend spread than ver‐ tical opening, there are no analysis known to WGFTFB that have attempted to assess  relative efficiency of single and twin rig trawls for any species, including shrimp us‐ ing this parameter. Thus the only reliable estimate of single vs. twin rig efficiency is  based on Icelandic data.  By extracting data from logbooks, MRI in Iceland have compared catches h‐1 from all  single and double rig hauls taken with 2400 – 3600 mesh circumferences trawls from 

 

42 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

1994  to  2000  in  Icelandic  waters.  The  catches  are  standardized  for  3000  mesh  trawl,  i.e.  Standardised catch h‐1 = catch × 3000 × h‐1 × (actual trawl circumference)‐1  Comparing  the  mean  catch  rates  for  every  year  from  single  trawl  hauls  with  those  from double trawls, average catch rates for twin trawls of 1.25 – 2.24 times that of a  single  trawl,  with  an  average  of  1.66  were  found  in  this  analysis.  The  between‐year  variations cannot be explained, but perhaps a more detailed analysis, taking into ac‐ count  time  of  year,  area,  vessel  size  etc.  would  reveal  the  reasons  for  these  differ‐ ences.  Table 7. Mean catches and number of vessels fishing with 2400 – 3600 mesh circumference trawls,  single and double rig, from 1994 – 2000 in Icelandic waters.  Year

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

No. vessels with double rig 















No. vessels with single rig 

24 

29 

22 

38 

37 

37 

32 

No. hauls with double rig 

420 

708 

115 

405 

1168 

705 

208 

No. hauls with single rig 

7373 

6927 

6067 

11377 

9319 

7542 

8052 

Mean shrimp catch h‐1 :Double 

665.9 

590.1 

571.8 

513.5 

443.2 

194.8 

235.8 

Mean shrimp catch h  :Single 

297.3 

308.8 

367.5 

354.5 

228.7 

156 

178.9 

Catch rate: double / single 

2.24 

1.91 

1.56 

1.44 

1.94 

1.25 

1.32 

‐1

A further comparison was carried out by MRI, Iceland for twin and single rig gears in  the Flemish Cap fisheries in March ‐ October for the period 1994 to 1999. Catches of  Icelandic  vessels  from  4513  hauls  with  twin  rig  and  5334  with  single  rig  were  stan‐ dardized  to  catch/h  pr.  3000  mesh  circumference  calculated  as  40mm  mesh  size  (which was about the average size of the trawls). Overall catch ratio twin rig: single  rig  was  found  to  be  1.90,  st.dev  =  0.30.  There  were  seasonal  variations  in  the  catch  ratio,  from  ~2  in  March  –  May,  to  1.5  –  1.7  in  September  –  October  (ratio  =  2.465  ‐  0.0816 × month, p< 0.005, 3 ≤ month ≤ 10). See Table 8 below.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 43

Table  8  Comparison  of  cpue  of  single  trawls  and  double  trawls  by  month  over  a  period  of  six  years. The area is the NW area (No. 3) of Flemish Cap. Kg/hr is standardised to a trawl size of 3000  meshes (40mm mesh size), i.e. estimated headline height of 13–14m. 

 

15.5 Catch Quality versus Catch Rate WGFTFB could find no evidence of multiple rigs being used to improve catch quality.  The sole motivation for using multiple rigs (twin or triple rigs) would appear solely  catch efficiency due to increased horizontal spread. The main tool that has improved  catch  quality  is  the  use  of  the  Nordmore  grid,  which  gives  cleaner  shrimp  catches.  There is evidence, however, of fishermen using so called twin or trouser codends in a  number of fisheries including the Pandalus shrimp fishery. These include:  •

UK Distant water cod fishery in Iceland and Greenland 



South African Hake fishery 



UK‐ Scottish and Irish Nephrops fisheries 

The motivation for using trouser codends, which in Canada are seen as an alternative  to twin‐rigs, are considered threefold: 

 

44 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Reducing  the  risk  or  impact  of  gear  damage  on  catches  by  splitting  the  catch; 



Increased wingend spread due to the increase in width of the trawl needed  to accommodate the additional codend; and 



Catch quality due to a splitting of the catch.  

Compared to a single trawl of a given size, a twin codend can achieve a 20% increase  in footrope spread. Experimentation with three codends has indicated that it is possi‐ ble to increase this to 47% compared to a single trawl. It is also important to note that  in trouser codend trawls the footrope swept area increase is concentrated in the mid‐ dle  section  of  the  net,  not  in  the  wings.  The  wider  centre  area  is a  major advantage  when targeting shrimp.   15.6 List of Participants Dominic Rihan  Haraldur Einarsson  John Willy Valdemarsen  Dick Ferro  Olafur Ingolfsson  Harald DeLouche  Kristain Zachariassen 

BIM  MRI  IMR  FRS  MRI  MI  FFL 

Ireland  Iceland  Norway  UK‐Scotland  Iceland  Newfoundland  Faroe Islands 

15.7 Conclusions 1 ) WGFTFB concludes that due to the catching process for shrimp, horizontal  opening is more important than filtered volume with respect to catch vol‐ umes and this is reflected in the current trends in shrimp trawl design.  2 ) WGFTFB concludes that due to the fundamental differences in the catching  process, comparisons between single and twin trawls for fish species and  shrimp are not relevant as herding efficiency by sweeps can very much in‐ fluence the capture efficiency for fish.  3 ) WGFTFB  can  find  no  reliable  estimates  of  single  vs.  twin  trawl  efficiency  based on horizontal spread. Icelandic effort data using trawl circumference  shows average catch rates for twin trawls of between 1.25‐ 2.24 times that  of a single trawl, with an average of 1.66.   4 ) WGFTFB  can  find  no  evidence  of  multiple  rigs  being  used  to  improve  catch  quality.  The  main  tool  used  that  does  improve  catch  quality  is  the  Nordmore  sorting  grid.  There  is  evidence,  however,  of  fishermen  using  twin  or  trouser  codends  to  reduce  the  risk  of  gear damage,  increase  win‐ gend spread and improve catch quality.  15.8 Recommendations 1 ) WGFTFB recommends the issue of shrimp trawl efficiency be addressed to  SGGEM as a case study for consideration   2 ) WGFTFB  recommends  further  analysis  of  the  Icelandic  or  other  suitable  datasets by SGGEM.  3 ) WGFTFB  recommends  that  SGGEM  should  consider  whether  horizontal  wingend spread can be used as an effort parameter for this fishery. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

16

| 45

ToR g): WGECO request as part of the OSPAR QSR 2010

16.1 General Overview With increasing public and political concerns on marine fisheries and environmental  issues,  fisheries  science  and  management  has  become  increasingly  complex.  The  move to the ecosystem based approach to Fisheries Management has gained momen‐ tum as the multiple uses of marine resources have broadened to take account of eco‐ system  considerations  and  the  recommendations  from  the  numerous  international  agreements, conferences and summits held on the subject. Some of the most impor‐ tant of these include: •

The 1972 World Conference on Human Environment.  



The 1982 United Nations Law of the Sea Convention.  



The  1992  United  Nations  Conference  on  Environment  and  Development  and its Agenda 21. 



The 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity. 



The 1992 Habitats Directive 



The 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement. 



The 1995 FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.  



The 2001 Reykjavik Declaration. 



The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development. 



The 2002 Green Paper of the European Commission 



UN 2006 General Assembly to ensure protection of vulnerable marine eco‐ systems 



The  2007  Committee  on  Fisheries  of  the  UN  FAO  on  IUU  and  protecting  the marine environment 



The 2007 Integrated Maritime Policy for the European Union 

ICES is in the process of restructuring its Science and Advisory processes and is col‐ laborating  with  HELCOM  and  OSPAR,  among  others,  in  the  evolution  of  a  holistic  ecosystem‐based approach to fisheries management. WGFTFB have been discussing  the subject of fishing impacts for a number of years and has addressed it as a specific  ToR in 2004 (ICES, 2004). Much of this though has been in isolation with limited dia‐ logue between other EG’s including WGECO. WGFTFB has recognised this and has  discussed  internally  the  need  to  define  its new  research  direction,  beyond  the  tradi‐ tional focus of bycatch reduction, into developing environmentally responsible fisher‐ ies  (ERF)  in  support  of  the  ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries  management.  The  stimulus  for  these  discussions  were  prompted  by  the  ever  increasing  ʹinternational  calls for ban on bottom trawling on high seas’ and also debate at the ʹ2006 ICES Sym‐ posium on Fishing Technology in the 21st Century: Integrating Fishing and Ecosys‐ tem  Conservationʹ  held  in  Boston  (Glass  et  al.,  2007).  Since  WGFTFB  works  closely  with and has industry people as part of their membership it felt that it should be   16.1.1 Terms of Reference

Recognizing  the  need  for  better  integration  between  WGFTFB  and  WGECO,  at  last  year’s FTFB meeting in Dublin (ICES, 2007) an ad hoc group made a first attempt to  address  this  and  explore  ways  of  enhancing  links  with  other  ICES  WG’s.  WGFTFB  also addressed a joint ToR with WGECO on the impacts of Crangon beam trawl fish‐

 

46 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

eries in the North Sea in 2007. Later in 2007 at the ICES ASC in Helsinki a ToR was  formulated between the Chairs of WGFTFB and WGECO as follows:  “For each OSPAR region, select and succinctly describe one or more representative  examples of gear modifications, which have resulted in changes to the ecosystem ef‐ fects of these gears, including if possible a range of ecosystem components.”  The work contributes to WGECO ToR b) which will pull together an environmental  assessment  of  the  impact  of  fisheries,  in  preparation  for  the  OSPAR  QSR.  It  is  also  seen as means to begin the wider debate on how to properly assess the effect and im‐ pact  of  gear  based  measures  through  the  development  of  a  proper  assessment  framework. This will be worked on at WGECO in 2009.  16.1.2 General Issues

To  address  the  specific  TOR,  a  Topic  Group  was  convened  and  worked  by  corre‐ spondence  prior  to  WGFTFB.  Representative  case  studies  were  identified  by  the  Topic  Group  to  illustrate  the  positive  and  negative  impacts  of  different  gear  based  technical measures. The identified cases studies were first introduced at plenary and  then the Topic Group convened to draft the documents. These were then presented at  plenary  and  recommendations  agreed.  The  case  studies  identified  are  as  shown  in  Table 9 below.  Table 9. Case studies, identified for the description of representative examples of gear modifica‐ tions that are designed and selected for the mitigations of ecosystem effects.  Case study

Fishing gear

Target species

OSPAR-region

Ecosystem component

1 (IRL) 

Gill net 

Mixed demersal 

OSPAR‐Region II,  III & IV 

Marine mammals 

2 (Eng) 

Demersal otter  trawl 

Norway lobster  (Nephrops  norvegicus) 

OSPAR‐region II 

Fish species 

3 (B,  NL, UK) 

Flatfish beam trawl 

Mixed, demersal  fish species, mainly  sole (Solea solea) and  plaice (Pleuronectes  platessa) 

OSPAR‐regions II,  III, IV 

Fish species  Benthic invertebrate  species 

4 (B,  DK, F,  GER,  NL, UK) 

Shrimp beam trawl 

Brown shrimp  (Crangon crangon.) 

OSPAR‐region II 

Mainly commercial  fish species 

5 (Faroe  islands) 

Pelagic otter trawl 

Blue whiting  (Micromesistius  poutassou) 

OSPAR‐region I &  V 

Fish species 

The case studies are presented in full in Annex 11. They are written in the following  format:  

 

i )

Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation.  

ii )

The drivers that initiated gear measures being developed or introduced. 

iii )

A description of what was done in terms of mitigation measures.  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 47

iv )

A  description  of  what  management  measures  were  taken  after  the  re‐ search i.e. was the mitigation measure introduced into regulation or was  it only tested and then used or not used voluntarily 

v )

A  description  of  how  the  impacts  of  the  gear  modifications  have  been  assessed. 

vi )

A description of how successful this has been in terms of reducing im‐ pacts. 

16.1.2.1 List of Participants

Jochen Depestele  Dominic Rihan  Tom Catchpole  Kristain Zacchariassen  Phil MacMullen  Andy Revill  Dick Ferro  Barry O’Neill 

ILVO  BIM  CEFAS  FFI  SFIA  CEFAS  FRS   FRS 

Belgium  Ireland  UK  Faroe Islands  UK (Part‐time)  UK (Part‐time)  UK‐Scotland (by correspondence)  UK‐Scotland (by correspondence) 

16.1.3 Conclusions

The  integration  of  fishing  gear  technology  research  in  the  framework  for  fisheries  management  is  a  prerequisite  for  achieving  an  ecosystem‐based  approach.  It  is  rec‐ ommended that many of the issues evolving from the selected case studies should be  taken into account in a framework for assessing impacts and management measures  related to fishing gear based technical measures.  Fishing gear technologists tend to focus on single or multiple commercial fish species.  With the exception of charismatic species, very little fishing gear research is focused  on  non‐target  fish  species  and  benthic  invertebrates;  although  such  gear  modifica‐ tions  might  have  an  effect  on  non‐target  fish  and  invertebrate  species.  Most  of  the  fishing gear research is driven by the fisheries management objectives, which is in its  turn mainly driven by the healthiness of commercial fish stocks. There is gradually a  focus on a more ecosystem‐based approach, but very few fishing gear research is yet  focusing on other ecosystem components. Therefore there is need to consider biologi‐ cal  and  ecological  impacts  of  gear  measures  during  the  research  phase  and  before  inception into legislation.   Fisheries  gear  research  has  and  is  focusing  on  the  reduction  of  physical  habitat  im‐ pacts (e.g. EU‐project “DEGREE”), but few of these efforts have been implemented in  the actual fisheries and this is reflected in the fact that the authors could not identify a  good case study to address this.   Research  on  gear  modifications  to  improve  selectivity  of  commercial  fish  species  through a variety of sorting devices has been proven to reduce bycatch and discards  rates, mainly of fish species (Valdemarsen and Suuronen, 2003, Suuronen and Sarda,  2008).  The  application  of  these  gear  modifications  can  be  achieved  through  regula‐ tions or sometimes through the voluntary use by fishermen. Regulatory and market  incentives both can lead to an improvement of fishing practice.  From  the  case  studies,  it  can  be  seen  that  communication  and  education are  vitally,  when introducing gear based measure into legislation. Regulations are in some cases  quickly introduced, but it takes time for the fishing industry to adapt. Case study 5  (blue whiting fisheries and the use of a flexi‐grid) illustrates that the compliance and   

48 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

acceptance of gear measures can be high, as a consequence of the involvement of the  Faroese fishing industry in the actual fishing gear research and the implementation of  the legislation. The first case study (gill net fisheries and the use of pingers) however,  is  a  clear  illustration  where  the  very  limited  involvement  of  the  fishing  industry  in  the  development  of  Acoustic  Deterrent  Devices,  its  application  and  implementation  through  legislation  leads  to  much  scepticism  towards  its  use.  The  proven  positive  effects  of  acoustic  deterrent  devices  for  certain  cetacean  species  and  fisheries  have  been largely undermined and the measure has been ineffective in meeting its objec‐ tives.  Another vital aspect for an effective use of gear modifications is a good framing of the  legislation.  There  is  a  need  to  consider  all  relevant  issues  (e.g.  practicalities,  socio‐ economic and technical aspects, etc.) to ensure that gear measures, proven effective in  fishing gear research, meet their objectives after implementation.  Non‐regulatory  uptake  of  technical  gear  measures  can  be  achieved  through  several  incentives.  The  incentives  can  be  market‐driven,  but  uptake  leading  to  an  improve‐ ment of the fisheries image is also present. One example is the use of the benthos re‐ lease panel. In this case, the drivers are economic incentives and an improvement the  image  of  fisheries  towards  the  public  perception  and  supermarkets  (achieved  through e.g. the UK Clean fishing competition). The use of selective methods by fish‐ ermen in other cases is apparent, when fishermen face or are subjected to a reduction  in  fishing  opportunities  through  other  restrictive  measures  (e.g.  access  to  closed  ar‐ eas,  increase  in  fishing  days,  etc.).  This  has  been  apparent  in  the  adoption  of  the  Nordmore grid in Norwegian shrimp fisheries, where fishermen had to adopt more  selective gear to remain I the fishery (Graham et al., 2007).   WGFTFB conclude that the protocol used in the UK‐study (Catchpole et al., 2008) to  evaluate the legislation put into force for the C. crangon fisheries is both holistic and  effective.  The  same  protocol  can  potentially  be  used  elsewhere  in  other  fisheries  to  conduct  similar  evaluations  on  the  efficacy  of  technical  measures.  This  protocol  in‐ cludes  an  evaluation  of  the  legislation  text,  performance  of  the  gear  modifications,  including  environmental  effects  and  a  socio‐economic  evaluation.  This  can  be  sup‐ plemented  by  evaluating  the  efficacy  of  technical  measures  through  proper  use  of  data  gathered  under  the  Data  Collection  Regulation,  e.g.  Enever  et  al.  (submitted).  Data collection programmes can be used to evaluate the gear measures put into force.  However,  these  evaluations  have  to  be  used  in  association  with  survey  data,  to  document changes in discards and/or landings/catch.   16.1.4 Recommendations

1 ) WGFTFB  recommends  that  WGECO  use  the  findings  of  the  case  studies  presented in the context of the OSPAR QSR 2010.   2 ) WGFTFB recommends that the case studies presented be used to assist in  the development of a framework that can be used to assess the efficacy of  gear‐based  technical  measures  introduced  to  reduce  the  environmental  impact of fishing 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

17

| 49

FAO Reduction of Bycatch in Tropical Shrimp Trawling (REBYC) project

17.1 Overview

Frank Chopin and Janae Fogelgren, FAO, FIIT, Rome ([email protected] &  [email protected])  The ICES Working Group on Fishing Technology and Fish Behaviour (WGFTFB) was  created  in  1983.  In  2002,  the  Food  and  Agriculture  Organisation  (FAO)  joined  with  ICES  to  co‐sponsor  the  WGFTFB,  giving  the  working  group  a  global  mandate.  Rec‐ ognizing the value of the WGFTFB and the need for enhanced collaboration between  ICES and FAO, a National Coordinators (NC) workshop of the FAO‐GEF‐UNEP pro‐ ject  EP/GLO/201/GEF  was  hosted  by  FAO  FIIT.  Back  to  back  meetings  of  the  NC  workshop were held prior to the FTFB meeting.  The  2008  NC  workshop  was  Chaired  by  Jonathan  Dickson  (The  Philippines)  and  Rapporteured by Oumarou Njifonjou (Cameroon). In order to make the results of the  NC meeting available to the ICES FTFB WG, three presenters [Jose Alio ‐ Latin Amer‐ ica,  Bundit  Chokesanguan  –  SE  Asia  and  James  Ogbonna  –  Africa]  were selected  to  present an update on bycatch reduction and change management activities from each  region  to  plenary.  Additionally,  each  NC  was  offered  the  opportunity  to  present  a  summary  of  their  recent  research  in  the  form  of  a  brief  paper.  This  report  contains  abstracts  of  each  report  submitted  by  each  NC.  More  detailed  reports  are  given  in  Annex 12.  17.2 National Report Summaries 17.2.1 Philippines

Jonathan  O.  Dickson:  Bureau  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Resources  ([email protected])  The pilot implementation project was carried out in Samar Sea (Calbayog City) from  September 1, 2005 to December, 2006. The experiments involved 18 shrimp and fish  trawlers  with  a  total  landed  catch  of  1,295  tonne  of  fish  from  991  fishing  trips.  The  average catch per‐unit effort (CPUE) for shrimp trawls (panghipon) was just below 1  tonne (948 kgs) per fishing trip while CPUE for fish trawl (palupad) was 2.4 tonnes per  fishing trip. Fishing season (peak months) was clearly identified as the months of Oc‐ tober and November with reduced catches in July‐ August.  Of  the  total  estimated  catch  of  711  tonnes  from  shrimp  trawls  for  the  study  period,  more than one third (37.9%) was comprised of lizard fish (Saurida spp), followed by  nemipterids (Nemipterus hexodon, Scolopsis sp., 10%) and about 1% of shrimps. The dis‐ cards were comprised of juveniles of commercially important species as well as other  small‐sized fish of low or no commercial value and are commonly utilized as aqua‐ culture feed was 15.6%. The composition of discards in shrimp trawls indicates a high  incidence of juveniles of commercially important species, among which were the liz‐ ard  fish  8.1%  (Saurida  sp.),  purple  spotted  bigeye  5.4%  (Dilat,  Priacanthus  tayenus),  cardinal fish 9.2% (Muong, Apogon sp., hairtail (Espada, Trichiurus sp.).   The efficiency of JTED V15 for releasing trash/discard fish was the best device tested  Shrimp trawl with a reduction of 59%. V10 gave a reduction of 20% and this was way  below the set target of 40% and was therefore rejected during the 1st quarter of im‐ plementation  trials.  For  commercial  fish  catches  only  the  V15  gave  a  reduction  of   

50 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

10%, and  this  was  apparently  the  reason  why  fishermen  were  hesitant in  using  this  device during the trials. H15 and V10 gave an increase of 11% in commercial catches,  while V12 gave an increase in 5%. With the fish trawls the reduction in trash/discard  catch was more apparent with the V12, V15 and H15 JTEDS with 54%, 58% and 46%  respectively. Again V10 with 20% gave reductions below the threshold. Interestingly,  the commercial catch indicated a significant increase with the V15 with a 66% higher  catch  and  H15  likewise  gave  an  increase  of  18%.  Reductions  in  commercial  catches  were observed with the V10 and V12 of 23% and 3% respectively.   A  large  amount  of  maturity  data  has  been  collected  for  Short  bodied  mackerel  and  nemipterids  species  has  a  good  data  in  terms  of  maturity.  The  data  collected  for  Rastrelliger kanagurta, locally known in Calbayog or Short bodied mackerel, showed  that its longest average length appeared in April with 225mm and its shortest average  length  in May.  Average length  was found  to  be  directly  proportional  to  the  highest  result  on  average  Gonad  Weight.  The  highest  Gonado  Somatic  Index  (GSI)  was  re‐ corded in April with 3.25 and 2.25 Gms, respectively. Mature samples were likewise  observed in April, May and July. Mature samples were further observed in October  and  December.  Most  of  the  samples  were,  however,  observed  in  April,  which  indi‐ cates that summer is the potential spawning season of this species. Nemipterids, as it is  locally known, in the area had its longest average length in August with 179mm and  its shortest average length in May (174mm). With regards to average GSI, December  showed  the  peak  with  1.91  followed  by  September  and  October  with  1.89  and  1.90  respectively. The same trend was seen with regards to average gonad weight. More‐ over,  the  majority  of  the samples  gathered  were immature (stages  I‐  III).  Significant  percentages of fully mature samples were observed throughout the sampling period  with December showing the highest number followed by October and July, Septem‐ ber and November.  17.2.2 Southeast Asia

Bundit Chokesanguan, SEAFDEC, Thailand, ([email protected])  The  demonstrations  and  experiments  on  the  use  of  JTEDs  were  conducted  in  Thai‐ land,  Brunei  Darussalam,  Vietnam,  Malaysia,  the  Philippines,  Indonesia  and  Myan‐ mar.Aside from the main aim on the introduction of the devices to member countries,  the research was also carried out to develop adjust and modify for the best perform‐ ance  of  the  Juvenile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  (JTEDs).  Various  kinds  of  JTEDs  were  used  in  the  experiment;  there  is  Rigid  Sorting  Grid,  Rectangular  shaped  win‐ dow  and  semicurved  window  with  different  grid  intervals  for  each  device.  The  re‐ sults  show  that  each  type  and  design  of  JTEDs  gave  different  performance  on  escapement rate of juvenile and commercial catch. The escapement rate ranged from  56.69–77% for juveniles and 9.72–47.31% for the commercial or target catch. Further‐ more the estimated selection curve of fish length was also considered. Based on this  experiment the Rigid Sorting Grid with 1.2 and 2 cm grid intervals gave better per‐ formance than other devices in maximizing the juvenile escapement while minimiz‐ ing the loss of commercial or target catch. The mean total length (TL) paralleled to the  size of the grid interval. It is recommended that the Rigid Sorting Grid with 1.2 and 2  cm grid intervals is appropriate to recommend to the region. However, other impor‐ tance factors such as the fishing ground, kind and size of target catch in each country  have to be well considered. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 51

17.2.3 Indonesia

Ari Purbatyanto, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Bogor Agricultural  University, Bogor, Indonesia  Research and engineering appropriate BRDs for developing the eco‐friendly trawl net  in Indonesia were conducted on fishing ground around Dolak islands waters in Ara‐ fura Sea from November 29 to December 9, 2007. The flume tank demonstration was  performed  at  Fishing  Technology  Laboratory,  Department  of  Fisheries  Resources  Utilization,  Bogor  Agricultural  University.  The  objectives  of  the  research  were  to  evaluate  technical  performance  of  BRDs  (TED  super  shooter,  square  mesh  window,  and fish eye); to collect baseline data on the catch composition of trawl net without  BRD; to compare effectiveness of three different types of BRDs tested in reducing the  bycatch from a commercial shrimp trawl fishery in Arafura sea in term of changes in  catch composition, catch weight and catch value; and to demonstrate the BRDs per‐ formance in the laboratory flume tank.  The  result  of  the  study  showed  that  the  square  mesh  window  and  fish  eye  showed  similar  good  technical  performance  in  comparison  with  the  US‐TED.  Although  the  US‐TED has low technical performance, it was better than the standard TED, particu‐ larly  from  the  view  point  of  material  used  that  give  a  little  bit  simple  in  handling  compared  to  the  standard  TED.  The  total  of  26  hauls  were  carried  out  successfully  consisted of 45 species of fish, 2 species of shrimp, and some species of crabs. From  those species of fish, 21 species of economic fish was utilized by the fishers. The fish  eye  has  high  effectiveness  in  reducing  bycatch  up  to  13.36%,  and  then  followed  by  square  mesh  window  (reduced  the  bycatch  up  to  5.98%).  The  US‐TED,  however,  failed  to  reduce  the  bycatch  (conversely  increased  the  bycatch  by  4.66%).  All  the  BRDs used have influenced on the shrimp loss i.e., 21.25% for the fish eye, 22.13% for  the square mesh window, and 32.29% for the US‐TED.  Flume tank observation from the three different types of BRDs showed a significant  technical performance and escaping behaviour of fish. The highest escapement of fish  was  from  square  mesh  window.  Whilst  the  fish  eye  and  US‐TED  and  fish  eye  have  low escapes. The position of fish eye and exit hole of the US‐TED has an effect to the  escapement process. The grid angle of 57.1º was suitable for allowing the unwanted  animal to escape.  It is recommended that three BRDs can be implemented. Although there are needed  further study to increase the effectiveness of the square mesh and fish eye, mainly to  decide the appropriate position of those BRDs on the codend for optimum function of  the BRDs to reduce the bycatch. Further research need to be conducted in long dura‐ tion of fishing trials that representing the fishing season.  Keywords:  appropriate  BRDs,  eco‐friendly,  technical  performance,  catch  composi‐ tion, effectiveness, bycatch, Arafura Sea.  17.2.4 Iran

A. Mojahedi, Iranian Fisheries Organisation, Deputy for Fishing and Fishing  Harbours, Tehran, Iran.  Research activities on Bycatch reduction started in 1992 at Persian Gulf Fisheries Re‐ search Centre (Boushehr) and First BRD fabricated in the same year. After these ini‐ tial  measures,  square  mesh  efficiency  in  Shrimp  trawl  net  was  investigated  and  100   

52 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

mm  Square  mesh  window,  showed  improved  results  in  excluding  small  fishes.  2  years after the use of SMW was made obligatory in shrimp trawl nets and achieving  not ideal results, Iran Fisheries Organization in cooperation with FAO, launched new  round of experiments in 1997. Different types of BRDʹs have been experimented dur‐ ing  these  trials,  such  as:  RES,  NAFTED,  Fisheye  and  cone.  Initial  outcomes  showed  that NAFTED is efficient for excluding large aquatics.  Broad range studies performed during years 2000–2001, on bar devices (NAFTED &  Grid)  and  SMW  comparison  and  results  pointed  out  that  Grid  Type  (NORDMOR  Grid)  is  the  most  efficient  one  comparing  with  other  devices.  Regarding  achieving  results, during 2006, 100 Grid 8mm devices, have been fabricated and applied for In‐ dustrial trawlers.  Regarding  this  fact  that,  more  than  90%  of  shrimp  capture,  harvested  by  artisanal  fishing  vessels  fleet  and  graduation  adjustment  plan  for  Industrial  trawlers  which  practically will reduce Industrial shrimp trawler numbers, therefore it is necessary to  experiment and promote BRDʹs on artisanal vessels. Then the aim of the project based  on excluding juvenile and small fish. All measures in project framework planned to  achieve this goal. Net modification is the first option for excluding juvenile and small  fish,  and  further  options  could  be  most  effective  device  which  will  be  selected  through experiments and advices we receive from international consultants.  17.2.5 Bahrain

Ebrahim A.A. Abdulqader, Bahrain Center for Studies and Research, Kingdom  of Bahrain, [email protected]  Among  the  29  direct  fisheries  identified  in  the  Bahrainʹs  waters  it  believed  that  shrimp trawling and Spanish mackerel drift gillnetting are responsible for most of the  bycatch  quantities  generated  in  Bahrainʹs  waters.  315  boats  are  involved  in  shrimp  trawl fishing; while small boats made up 24% of these boats. The 1999–2000 BRD tri‐ als  were  the  only  systematic  work  conducted  in  Bahrain.  The  experimental  Bycatch  Reduction  Device  (BRD)  is  composed  of  an  oval‐shaped  solid  grid  and  2ʺ  radius  square mesh (RSM) to exclude at two stages large animals and smaller finfish species  respectively.  The  overall  results  suggested  a  30%  reduction  in  finfish  species  on  a  weight basis, while it maintained crab and shrimp catches. BRD experiments revealed  that among the 92 finfish species found in the bycatch, 30 finfish species were able to  escape  from  the  net  and  14  finfish  species  were  unable  to  escape.  This  BRD  experi‐ ence indicates that increasing the selectivity of trawl nets is beneficial to the shrimp  fishery and maintains the biodiversity of the marine habitat. It also suggests that se‐ lectivity is an effective management measure to reduce the fishing intensity on Bah‐ rainʹs shrimp stocks. Despite the early participation of the Kingdom of Bahrain in this  GEF/FAO  global  program,  the  benefits  obtained  are  minimal.  Several  concepts  are  outlined to form the core of a future national plan for Kingdom of Bahrain under this  global program.  17.2.6 Cuba

Luis Font Chávez, Fishery Ministry, Havana, Cuba, [email protected]  Constructive characteristics of trawl nets used in tropical shrimp fisheries, present a  marked  negative  effect  on  benthic  populations  and  bottom  species,  constituting  a  threat for conservation of biological diversity and marine environment. Nevertheless  and  taking  into  account  that  the  catch  of  this  resource  represents  an  important  eco‐ nomic  and  social  source,  it  is  necessary  to  promote  the  use  of  lower  impact  catch   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 53

technologies and that their introduction in the fishery be technical and economically  feasible. Results reached up to present in the project have been aimed to the design,  construction  and  test  at  experimental  and  commercial  level,  in  Santa  Cruz  del  Sur  Fishing  Enterprise,  of  a  less  harmful  fishing  technology  to  environment,  being  veri‐ fied important advantages as: to allow an escape of near 25% of bycatch, thus reduc‐ ing  the  negative  effect  on  fish  populations  and  specially  juvenile  stages  of  Lane  snapper (Lutjanus synagris) and also increasing the fishing gear selectivity to the catch  of  Pink  shrimp  (Farfantepenaeus  notialis),  with  no  detriment  of  the  present  observed  levels and consequently an increase in the catch exportable value. At the same time,  regulatory measures on the fishery have been dictated which substantially contribute  to the protection of shrimp populations and species composing bycatch. Other fore‐ seen results are related to the reduction of net constructive costs and fuel consump‐ tion. Project execution has been characterized by the active participation of managers,  technical  personnel  of  the  Enterprise,  as  well  as  captains  and  fishermen  of  shrimp  vessels,  who  have  contributed  with  valuable  experiences  and  practical  execution  in  the project development by participating in cruises, conferences, workshops and ad‐ vanced  qualifying  courses for  the  personnel  dedicated  to  net  construction.  The  new  fishing system will be introduced in Santa Cruz del Sur Fishing Enterprise at the end  of ban of 2008–2009 seasons.  17.2.7 Trinidad and Tobago

Suzuette  Soomai,  Fisheries  Division,  Ministry  of  Agriculture,  Land  and  Ma‐ rine Resources, [email protected]   Three periods of gear trials were conducted over 2006 and 2007 in the artisanal fleet  and one period in 2007 in the semi‐industrial and industrial fleets, overall covering an  estimated 25% of the national trawl fleet. Gear trials involved modifying the existing  trawl  net,  testing  of  two  bycatch  reduction  devices  (BRDs)  namely  the  fisheye  and  square mesh panel, and testing of a new monofilament trawl net received from Mex‐ ico  and  aimed  at  reducing  the  level  of  discards  of  bycatch  caught  in  the  artisanal  shrimp trawl fishery. Overall results are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of  each BRD in reducing discards. Modifications to the existing net and the new mono‐ filament  net  however  showed  favourable  results  with  regard  to  making  fishing  op‐ erations more efficient. Joint gear testing between the Fisheries Department and the  fishing  industry  has  been  beneficial  in  educating  fishers  and  promoting  co‐ management  of  the  trawl  fishery.  Technical  assistance  from  the  National  Fisheries  Institute  of  Mexico  and  from  the  FAO  was  instrumental  in  technology  transfer  and  enhancing  fisheries  research  in  Trinidad  and  Tobago.  Gear  testing  allowed  for  col‐ laboration  with  Venezuela  on  joint  research  in  the  Gulf  of  Paria  and  the  Columbus  Channel where the shrimp and groundfish resources are shared.   17.2.8 Venezula

Luís Marcano and José Alió, ([email protected] ; [email protected]  Discarded  by  catch  of  the  industrial  shrimp  fleet  in  Venezuela  is  about  60%  and  is  considered  a  major  environmental  impact  in  the  country.  Tests  were  conducted  to  reduce  discards  in  the  industrial  and  artisanal  shrimp  fleets.  The  industrial  shrimp  fishing is performed by 260 Florida type vessels, targeting shrimp and fish. The use of  TED is mandatory. Testing of bycatch reductions devices (BRD) like fish eye showed  a  significant  reduction  in  discards  but  also  severe  losses  of  commercial  catch.  The  square  mesh  panel  did  not  provide  significant  reductions  of  discards.  The  lower  or  lifted  lower  rope  rendered  an  average  25%  reduction  in  discards  and  no  significant   

54 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

loss of commercial catch. The artisanal shrimp fishing is done with small trawls and  beach  seines.  The  former  was  modified  with  Nordmore  grid,  square  panel  and  fish  eye. Better results were obtained with the fish eye, which showed a reduction in dis‐ cards  close  to  70%,  but  a  30%  shrimp  loss  was  confronted.  Tests  of  BRDs  will  con‐ tinue after FAOGEF project ends in 2008, organizing workshops with fishers to show  construction and use of the devices, and sharing of results with researchers and fish‐ ers of countries in the region is to be promoted.  17.2.9 Mexico

Dr Miguel Angel Cisneros Mata, Chief Director, Instituto Nacional de Pesca  PACIFIC COAST

A 10 day’s cruise onboard commercial vessel at the west coast of Baja California Pen‐ insula  face  operations  problems  since  there  was  a  huge  presence  of  a  crustacean  known  as  “langostilla”  (Pleuroncondes  planipes);  trawls  sets  were  rather  short  and  non representative in all shrimp fishing ground areas.  Due to engine brake‐down of BIP XI, an 8 days cruise for sea trials in the Upper Gulf  of California was made; results confirmed advantages of prototype RS‐INP‐MEX, in  previous  trials.  Comparison  of  bycatch  reduction  and  catch  efficiency  of  prototype  was possible since a set of traditional trawl nets were tested; all expenses were cov‐ ered by the Walton Foundation through WWF.  ATLANTIC COAST

Arrangements were made to use commercial trawlers for testing of new net designs  and  the  introduction  of  BRDs  at  Tampico,  Tamaulipas  and  Ciudad  del  Carmen,  Campeche.  Since  the  fleet  composition  and  technical  characteristic  of  trawl  nets  has  changed, a survey was carried out in those two ports, for data collection of 30 shrimp  trawlers.  Two  meetings  were  held  with  vessel  owners  from  the  Atlantic  coast,  where  the  stockholders asked to include testing of new otter boards (High Lift) used in the Pa‐ cific phase of the project, in order to achieve further fuel savings.  Due to lack of researchers it was decided that all sea trials were going to have place  during the shrimp ban of the Atlantic; cost of testing/fishing operations will be cover  by the stockholders, except DSA payment of researchers and new gear and devices.  Research for artisanal shrimp fisheries have started in the Upper Gulf of California in  order  to  reduce  the  impact  of  enmeshing  shrimp  nets  on  endemic  endangered  por‐ poise  (Vaquita);  also,  due  to  mixed  presence  of  juvenile  white  shrimp  (Litopenaeus  setiferus) while trawling for REBYC  Reduction of Environmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling, through the in‐ troduction of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and Change of Management Sietebar‐ bas shrimp (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri), a new project will start in 2008 in the Atlantic coast,  to introduce a new trawl net with short front upper panel or no front upper panel.  17.2.10

Columbia

Mario Rueda & Farit Rico, Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (In‐ vemar), [email protected]  Quantification  of  tropical  shrimp  trawling  impacts  and  mechanics  to  reduce  it  on  both on Caribbean and Pacific coasts were evaluated. The methodological approach   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 55

included census of the fishing technology, monitoring, workshops, trials and fishing  experiments. The census revealed that vessels and net designs are more than 30 years  old.  Monitoring  of  fishing  operations  showed  the  following  catch  composition:  shrimp  8%,  incidental  catch  27%  and  discards  65%  for  the  Caribbean;  while  for  the  Pacific shrimp is 5%, incidental catch is 43% and discards is 52%. With this in mind  new trawl nets were designed, introducing new netting materials and BRDs (fisheye  and  TED).  12  Trawl  nets  prototype  were  manufactured  during  2  workshops,  where  60 fishers were trained in fishing trials. These trawl nets were used in fishing experi‐ ments comparing catches of an experimental vessel (using prototype nets) with those  of a control vessel (using traditional nets) to test reduction of bycatch and fuel con‐ sumption if possible. For the Caribbean 80 hauls paired showed that the bycatch was  reduced as follows 20% (fisheye), 41% (TED), 54 (fisheye + TED); while for the Pacific  240 hauls showed reductions of 28% (fisheye), 23% (TED) and 57% (fisheye + TED). In  the Caribbean the fuel saved was 17%, whereas on the Pacific the save was 25%. Cur‐ rent decrease of the shrimps stocks and high fuel prices, are part of the issues that the  fishery management agency in Colombia faces to change of management.  17.2.11

Costa Rica

Antonio Porras Porras, INCOPESCA, [email protected]  Costa Rica is localized in Central American. In Costa Rica, the project concerns Pacific  waters.  This  area  has  all  shrimp  trawling  fishery,  but  which  are  currently  severely  threatened  by  over  fishing,  contamination  and  global  environment  effects.  The  pro‐ ject  is  under  the  supervision  of  the  Costa  Rican  Institute  of  Fisheries  and  Aquacul‐ ture, INCOPESCA. The semi‐industrial sub sector has 72 registered shrimp trawlers  vessels  (49  operating)  based  in  Puntarenas.  These  vessels  are  shrimp  trawlers  with  large  quantities  of  juveniles.  Bycatch  and  trash  fish  constitute  mostly  70%  of  the  products caught.   Sea  trips  were  organized  from  June  2007  to  March  2008  and  were  undertaken  on  board  of  the  commercial  vessel  “Cap.  Yerald”.  This  vessel  reduced  the  expenses  in  the research phase (in kind contribution of the private sector). The trawler used two  nets  while  fishing.  This  practice  permitted  a  comparative  study  between  the  proto‐ type net, the traditional net, and tested BRD’s. The Square mesh window and the eye  fish inside of the codend.   Eleven fishing trips were carried out and included fifty four tows, each of this trawl‐ ing  were  of  five  of  six  hours  long.  However,  in  a  preliminary  way,  we  obtained  at  least a 20% reduction of bycatch and the conclusion that for each kilogram of shrimp,  seventy kilogram of bycatch are fished.   The  National  coordinator  participated  on  two  training/demonstration  activities  or‐ ganized  in  Cuba  and  Mexico  (Demonstrations/Sea‐Trials  on  fisheye  BRDs  and  Suripera net used). Two training workshops on BRDs and Prototypes net were organ‐ ized  and  some  fishermen  and  net  makers  were  trained  on  how  to  build  the  nets.  A  practical training was also organized on board of a commercial vessel in Puntarenas.  Two  kinds  of  BRDs,  the  Square  mesh  window  codend  and  the  fisheye  were  tested  and compared with a traditional codend. Three workshops on REBYC and Costa Ri‐ can Project result were organized in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Panama countries in  April, 2008. Sixty five participants were in these workshops (three day for each one)  and to fishers, stakeholders, technicians, and governmental authorities were prepara‐ tion. 

 

56 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

17.2.12

Nigeria

James Ogboona, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research  (NIOMR), Lagos, [email protected])  Nigeria  is  one  of  the  participating  countries  involved  in  GEF/UNEP/FAO  Shrimp  Fisheries  Project  titled:  ‘Reduction  of  Environmental  impact  from  Tropical  Shrimp  Trawling through the introduction of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and change of  management’. The main objective is the reduction of bycatch in shrimp fisheries.  Nigerian  Institute  for  Oceanography  and  Marine  Research,  (NIOMR)  Lagos  is  cur‐ rently  implementing  2  complementary  research  activities  in  the  Eastern  Gulf  of  Guinea sub region of West Africa on the following:  a ) The  development/adaptation  of  appropriate  bycatch  reduction  tech‐ nologies for the shrimp trawlers in Nigeria and Cameroon. This tech‐ nical part of the project involved the construction of prototype Bycatch  Reduction Devices (BRDs) and Turtle Excluder Device (TED) for fleet  testing  on  board  conventional  shrimp  vessels  in  Nigeria  and  Camer‐ oon. The awareness created has extended to other States in the sub re‐ gion including Togo Republic, Republic of Benin, Gabon, Sao Tome &  Principe and Equatorial Guinea.  b ) The  design  and  conduct  of  a  socio‐economic  survey  of  the  shrimp  trawl fisheries and the trading of their bycatch   The technical development/adaptation of reduction technologies Turtle Excluder De‐ vices (TEDs) are installed in the codend extension of shrimp trawl nets as a manage‐ ment  tool  to  reduce  fishery  related  sea  turtle  mortality.  Trawl  nets  with  bycatch  reduction devices (BRDs) are also constructed in order to mitigate the problem of ju‐ venile and immature fish bycatch in shrimp trawling. The combinations of TED and  BRD  in  the  same  trawl  net  are  expected  to  function  perfectly  well  and  complement  each  other  without  any  drastic  reduction  in  the  quantity  of  shrimps.  The  data  re‐ corded during comparative demonstration trials of trawl nets fitted with TED, BRD  codends and the traditional square mesh codend, are shown in Table 1. As shown in  Table 2 the results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that there was no sig‐ nificant  variation  in  the  mean  values  of  shrimps  caught  by  the  various  trawl  net  codends.   17.2.13

Cameroon

Oumarou Njifonjou, IRAD‐SRHOL PMB, Cameroon, ([email protected])  In Africa, the project concerns Nigeria and Cameroon waters. This area has vast fish‐ eries resources, which are critical to the food security of the region, but which are cur‐ rently  severely  threatened  by  over  fishing,  urban  runoff  and  offshore  petroleum  exploitation. The project is under the supervision of the Fisheries Department and is  implemented  in  Cameroon  by  the  Fisheries  and  Oceanography  Research  Station  (SRHOL).  The  Artisanal  shrimp  fisheries  utilizes  more  than  1000  fishermen  and  for  the moment the Industrial sub sector has 41 registered shrimp trawlers from Nigeria  and 30 based in Douala. Most of these vessels are shrimp trawlers with small mesh  sizes and this inevitably results in large quantities of juveniles. Bycatch and trash fish  constitute mostly 95% of the products caught and 75% of the finfish landed are juve‐ niles  caught  before  first  maturity.  The  increase  of  the  shrimp  fishing  effort  over  the  years, the high level of fish caught by shrimp trawlers, the continue reduction of the   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 57

sizes of fish landed, the high price of fish on the markets and the political will to con‐ serve  and  sustain  the  fisheries  resources  are  the  main  motivation  for  the  establish‐ ment  of  bycatch  reduction  legislation/regulations.  In  the  new  fisheries  Law  to  be  promulgated, BRDs and TEDs utilization has been introduced as one of the basic re‐ quirements for the license application.  17.3 List of Participants Andres Seefoo  Antonio Porras  Bundit Chokesanguan  Frank Chopin  James C. Ogbonna  Janne Fogelgren  Jonathan Dickson  Jose Alio  Luis Marcano  Mario Rueda  Oumarue Njifonjou 

INAPESCA  IFA  SEAFDEC  FAO  Fisheries Dept  FAO  BFAR  INIA  INIA  INVMAR  IRAD/SHOL 

Mexico  Costa Rica  Thailand  Italy  Nigeria  Italy  Phillipines  Venezuela  Venezuela  Columbia  Cameroon 

17.4 Conclusions In  2008,  REBYC  I  will  come  to  an  end.  Significant  progress  has  been  made  towards  reducing the bycatch of large charismatic species such as marine turtles captured by  tropical shrimp trawls, however, significant problems remain with respect to the cap‐ ture  of  juvenile  fish  and  sustainable  management  of  tropical  mixed  species  bottom  trawl fisheries.  It is the hope of FAO and the NCs that a second phase project will be implemented  and broadened to a greater number of countries and incorporating a broader range of  management  tools  to  manage  multi  species  trawl  fisheries.  This approach  is  echoed  by  the  EC  in  European  Parliament  Resolution  P6_TA‐PROV  (2008)  0034  on  ʺReduc‐ tion in unwanted bycatch and elimination of discards in European Fisheriesʺ. Given  then there are other concerns with bottom trawls that also need to be addressed, per‐ haps there is the opportunity for an International Plan of Action.  Discussion

Questions  were  raised  as  to  why  fishermen  continue  to  use  BRDs  if  they  are  losing  income. A number of the FAO representatives replied to this. In the case of Nigeria  there had been a certain amount of embarrassment at government level with the high  level of bycatch, so they made the use of BRDs and TEDs are compulsory but intro‐ duced  a  fuel  subsidise  to  incentives  compliance.  In  Mexico  there  are  no  economic  gains in landing bycatch and there are incentives such as reduced fuel consumption,  improved catch quality and saving sorting time so using the devices is acceptable to  fishermen. In the Philippine although there is are some financial gains from landing  bycatch species, financial support from fishing companies has encouraged fishers to  use BRDs.  The analogy of US imposing trade embargoes on countries whose fleets did not use  TEDs in shrimp fisheries was used to indicate how economic drivers are a strong in‐ centive to adopt selective gears. It was stated that a similar policy may be applied by  the US in the near future with the use of circle hooks being made mandatory in sur‐ face longline fisheries for tuna and swordfish fisheries.  

 

58 |

18

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Summary of Other Presentations An open session was held on Tuesday 22 April at which the following presentations  were given to plenary.  

18.1 Nordic Project; Research in big mesh pelagic trawls

Frodi B. Skúvadal   Faroese Fisheries Laboratory, Noatun 1, P O Box 3051, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands  Abstract

A  Nordic  project  involving  the  Faroe  Islands,  Iceland  and  Norway  researching  pe‐ lagic trawling is being undertaken with funding from the Nordic Council. The focus  areas  of  this  project  are  optimization  of  large  mesh  pelagic  trawl  designs,  with  re‐ gards to water flow and fish behaviour, minimizing bycatch of non target species and  the use of pelagic trawls for demersal species. The pelagic fisheries in these countries  are similar with regards to fishing units, gear and fished stocks. The form of the col‐ laboration is through workshops, participation on cruises and collaborative meetings.  Measurements of flow have been made with ADCPs (Acoustic Doppler Current Pro‐ filers) that measure speed and direction of the flow in a profile inside the trawl. The  methodology is to use one ADCP on the headline and one in the belly section, close to  the  codend.  Collections  of  escapees  have  been  carried  out  by  means  of  small  mesh  collection bags attached to the aft belly of the trawls. Observations of fish behaviour  have been made with acoustic and optical devices.  Preliminary Faroese results from flow measurements inside large mesh pelagic trawls  suggest that there is a reduction of two thirds in velocity in front of the codend com‐ pared with the velocity at the headline. These measurements were made in a 2300 m  pelagic  trawl  with  a  70  m  long  codend.  Results  indicate  that  the  size  of  the  codend  has a reducing effect on the water velocity in front of the codend. Further flow meas‐ urements and behaviour observations of fish inside the aft belly of pelagic trawls will  be made in 2008 and 2009.  Discussion It was pointed that the Dutch had conducted experiments with similar measurements  and  found  that  T90  releases  more  water  than  standard  diamond  mesh.  It  was  also  explained that there is a need to be careful when interpreting the results from other  referenced studies on flow changes around trawls as most of them were conducted in  much smaller gears which may not be representative.  18.2 Direct observations of large mesh capelin trawls; evaluation of mesh escapement and gear efficiency

Haraldur Arnar Einarsson, Einar Hreinsson, Sigurður Þór Jónsson, MRI-Iceland

Abstract This  paper  describes  methods  for  observing  large  pelagic  capelin  (Mallotus villosus, Müller)  trawls,  evaluation  of  meshing  and  mesh  escape,  in situ school  density  and  catching efficiency. Gear monitoring sensors were used to measure gear opening pa‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 59

rameters  and  vertical  position.  Information  on  trawl  geometry  was  collected  with  a  headline  sonar,  sonar  and  cameras  mounted  on  a  remotely  operated  towed  vehicle  (ROTV), and data from depth recording sensors. The cross section area for each net  section was used to calculate the volume of seawater filtered by each mesh size. Cap‐ elin behaviour was observed by the use of underwater cameras, HL‐sonar, and ROTV  mounted sonar. Acoustic data were collected with a calibrated 38‐kHz echo sounder  to  evaluate  mean  volume  density  of  capelin  in  number  of  fish  per  cubic  metre.  The  observations  provided  valuable  information’s  of  the  gear  shape  and  performance.  Capelin showed strong reaction to artificial light, by swimming downwards few sec‐ onds after the lights were turned on. Capelin was seen escaping mesh sizes from 80  mm to 16 m. Meshing was recorded in 80 to 800 mm meshes, highest in the 80–160  mm range. Sonar images showed both escaping capelin and capelin being herded in  mesh sizes from 16m down to 200 mm. No escapement was recorded through meshes  60 mm and smaller. Measurements of trawl geometry, capelin density, and catch vol‐ umes, indicate low catching efficiency. A theoretical model for quantitative estimates  of the efficiency, based on cross section density measurements, and a practical meth‐ odology for acquiring such density measurements are described in the paper.   18.3 Design and test of a topless shrimp trawl to reduce pelagic fish bycatch in the Gulf of Maine pink shrimp fishery

Pingguo He1, David Goethel2 and Tracey Smith1    Ocean  Process  Analysis  Laboratory  of  Institute  for  the  Study  of  Earth,  Oceans  and  Space  and  New  Hampshire  Sea  Grant,  University  of  New  Hampshire,  142  Morse  Hall,  Durham,  NH 03824, USA. Email: [email protected]  2. F/V “Ellen Diane”, 23 Ridgeview Terrace,  Hampton, NH, USA 03842  1

Abstract A  new  innovative  shrimp  trawl  was  designed,  and  tested  in  the  flume  tank,  and  at  sea to evaluate its potential of reducing finfish bycatch in the pink shrimp fishery in  the Gulf of Maine. The trawl design removed the square and the top part of the sec‐ tion after the square (first belly section), to become “topless”. A five‐day sea trial was  carried  out  using  the  alternative  tow  method  to  compare  the  new  topless  net  and  a  control net (commercial net). The target species was the pink shrimp (Pandalus bore‐ alis) and the major bycatch species was Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) (90.6% of all  bycatch by weight). Comparative fishing indicated that the new topless net reduced  bycatch of Atlantic herring by an average of 86.6%, and at the same time produced a  modest increase (13.5%) in the catch of the pink shrimp. There was some increase in  the  bycatch  of  flounders  (American  plaice,  Hippoglossoides  platessoides,  and  winter  flounder,  Pseudopleuronectes  americanus),  though  overall  amount  of  flounder  bycatch  was less than 1% of the total catch. The reduction of herring was most likely due to  the fish escaping over the headline where the top panel was removed. The increased  bycatch of flounders (and increased catch of shrimp) might have been resulted from a  wider wing end spread and subtle differences in the footgear between the new and  control nets. The substantial reduction of the major bycatch species (herring) without  a reduction of target species (shrimp) proved the concept of the topless shrimp trawl  and may have a profound impact on other shrimp trawl fisheries around the world. 

 

60 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Discussion The author was asked if diurnal effects were taken into account but as essentially this  is  a  daylight  fishery,  the  experiments  were  conducted  accordingly  during  daylight  hours so diurnal effects were not an issue. It was also stated that the shrimp rise dur‐ ing the night. The question was also raised if there was difference in fuel consump‐ tion  with  the  new  design.  This  was  not  specifically  measured  but  drag  of  the  new  gear was similar at the same towing speed to the conventional gear.   18.4 FISHSELECT - a tool for predicting basic selective properties for netting

Bent Herrmann, Ludvig A. Krag, Rikke P. Frandsen, Niels Madsen, Bo  Lundgren  DTU Aqua, Technical University of Denmark  Abstract In towed fishing gears like trawls, technical regulations aim at retaining marketable  fish and releasing non‐marketable fish. Different species have different morphologi‐ cal characteristics such as cross‐section shape and their potential for deformation dur‐ ing mesh penetration. Identifying the optimal mesh size and mesh shape is therefore  a  complex  procedure  depending  both  on  the  species  morphology  and  the  defined  minimum landing sizes (MLS). We present a new methodology, FISHSELECT, devel‐ oped  to  make  a  first  prediction  of  the  basic  selective  properties  of  different  netting  panels. By applying the methodology and the specially developed tools, we identify  and  record  the  species  specific  morphological  features  that  are  decisive  for  mesh  penetration.  Data  on  these  features  are  processed  in  an  integrated  software  tool  to  produce  design  guides  for  different  netting  panels.  The  design  guides  provide  a  powerful  tool  that  facilitates  the  predictions  of  optimal  netting  designs  for  a  given  fishery.  Examples  on  application  of  FISHSELECT  are  presented  for  Cod,  Haddock,  Plaice, Turbot, Lemon Sole, Sole and Nephrops.  Discussion The question was raised whether the model takes into account rigor‐mortis effects in  the  “Fall  Through”  experiments.  The  author  replied  that  this  affect  was  expected  to  be significant and so fresh, very recently killed fish were used for this reason.  Regarding seasonal variations in morphology for given lengths of fish, this was not  studied fully but will be taken into account in future work. However, the experience  with cod at pre spawning stage in January did not show much difference as the com‐ pressed morphology for this species did not change much.  It was highlighted that simulations made in the study confirm that for round fish us‐ ing square mesh is the optimum way to reduce the variation in selectivity by main‐ taining a relatively constant mesh shape but for flat fish L50 is reduced in square mesh  codends.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 61

18.5 Technical and selective properties of T90 meshes codend-extension tandems made of different netting stiffness

W. Moderhak,   Sea Fisheries Institute, 81–332 Gdynia, ul. Kollataja 1, Poland  Abstract Four  T90  codend‐extension  combinations  were  investigated  on  the  Polish  research  vessel BALTICA in years 2006 and 2007. The study showed that the construction of  the extension influenced the selectivity of the codend even if the codend has the same  construction each time. The results obtained during the study show that the best solu‐ tion is when the codend and the extension are made of the same netting, or when the  extension is made of stiffer netting than the codend. Studies in this subject should be  continued.  Discussion The question was raised if catch quantities in the codend as taken into consideration  in  the  experiments.  The  author  replied  that  the  catch  was  stimulated  by  drag  for  which the corresponding catch amount was unknown. A previous study by O’Neill  et  al  (2004)  was  referred  to  which  attempted  to  measure  the  drag  forces  acting  on  codends.  18.6 Fuel Saving Initiatives in the French Fishing Industry

Benoit Vincent,  IFREMER, Lorient, France  Abstract The Fishing Gear Technology unit of IFREMER has been working on energy savings  for  some  years.  We  present  different  applications,  particularly  collaboration  with  tropical shrimp Malagasy fishing companies and collaboration with regional fishing  companies. The work is based on an optimization of the trawl and doors, using flume  tank trials and numerical simulation. The method used is detailed as well as typical  results  and  potential  savings.  The  importance  of  the  communication  and  exchange  with fishermen and net makers are also underlined.  Discussion The question was raised as to whether with the low drag gear whether there was dif‐ ference in catch efficiency. The author replied that there was not in Madagascar but in  the  shrimp  fisheries,  fishers  preferred  to  use  smaller  meshes  in  the  rear  part  of  the  net. It was felt that the low drag nets may not always work in certain conditions such  as high current or bad weather. Therefore, there is need for them to be tested in a va‐ riety of conditions before suggesting to the industry for commercial uptake. 

 

62 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

18.7 Modelling flow through and around nets using computational fluid dynamics

Øystein Patursson  Abstract Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling and measurements have been used  to  investigate  current  flow  through  and  around  net  panels  and  fish  farming  cages.  For the numerical computations a porous media model was used to represent the net  allowing  efficient  computation  of  both  exterior  and  interior  flow  fields.  The  model  was calibrated using tow tank measurements on a net panel at different velocities and  angles of attack. The CFD method was able to reproduce the drag and lift coefficients  of the net panel and the velocity reduction behind the net panel with satisfactory ac‐ curacy.  The approach was validated for a small size gravity cage by comparing CFD predic‐ tions with tow tank measurements of drag force on the cage and velocity reduction  inside  the  cage  and  in  the  wake  region.  The  validation  process  showed  very  good  agreement  between  measured  and  modelled  velocities  inside  the  cage  and  a  slight  discrepancy in the wake region.  The same approach should be applicable to trawls as well, but a new study is needed  for the calibration and validation of the model to different types of net and the new  geometry.  Discussion It was highlighted that for the trawl simulations there is a need to find a new system  without using fixed frames. It was pointed that rigid net elements may be a solution  and work done in East Germany and at the University of Arnhem using a lattice grid  arrangement were referred too.  18.8 Comparison of selective properties for nettings when used in normal direction versus in 90 degrees turned direction (Poster)

Bent Herrmann, Ludvig Krag, Niels Madsen  DTU Aqua, Technical University of Denmark  Abstract Experimental studies have indicated that the size selective properties of normal (T0)  diamond mesh nettings used for trawl codends can be improved by turning the net‐ ting  orientation  90  degrees  (T90).  The  potential  effect  of  T90  has  also  been  investi‐ gated by simulation techniques. A T90 codend has been introduced in the Baltic cod  fishery as a legal alternative to the BACOMA codend. But how big is the T90 effect  and  how  dependent  is  this  effect  on  the  varying  loading  acting  on  the  netting  throughout the fishing process? How dependent is this effect on the netting charac‐ teristics like mesh size and twine thickness? We apply the FISHSELECT and NETVI‐ SION  methodologies  in  a  pilot  study  to  demonstrate  how  the  T90  effect  can  be  investigated  and  quantified.  Initial  results  for  a  few  netting  designs  are  reported  to  demonstrate the applicability of the used methods.  NETVISION is a method to acquire and describe shapes of meshes in trawl nettings  when  these  are  loaded  in  directions  T0  and  T90.  NETVISION  uses  image  analysis   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 63

techniques  to  collect  the  mesh  shapes  data  in  a  netting  panel.  The  extracted  mesh  shapes are loaded into FISHSELECT to predict and compare estimates for L50. FISH‐ SELECT and NETVISION can handle parametric as well as non‐parametric mesh de‐ scriptions.  By  combining  NETVISION  and  FISHSELECT  we  quantify  the  difference  between  T0  and  T90  netting  for  different  loading  situations  and  estimate  the  T90‐ EFFECT based on the ratio between the estimated L50 values. If the T90 orientation  has a higher L50 value than the T0 orientation then the T90‐EFFECT is larger than 1.0  for that specific loading situation. This is exemplified for cod based on FISHSELECT‐ data. We used four pieces of netting with quite different characteristics with respect  to the ratio between twine thickness and mesh size and investigated the influence of  these design parameters on the T90‐EFFECT. Based on realistic estimates of the drag  forces acting on  codends when  towed  we  investigated  four  different  loading  condi‐ tions.  The shapes of meshes in four different nettings under different loading conditions are  shown.  The  T90‐EFFECT  is  quantified  in  each  case.  The  results  imply  that  the  T90‐ EFFECT is dependent on the loading condition and is affected by the netting charac‐ teristics. For a net with a relatively large mesh size compared to the twine thickness a  relatively small load will close the meshes in both netting orientation (T0 & T90). The  opening of a fully stretched T90‐mesh is defined by the size of the knot which is small  for netting 1 due to the thin twine. A larger T90‐EFFECT is found for nettings 3 and 4  where  the  mesh  size  is  relatively  small  compared  to  the  twine  thickness.  This  will  increase the mesh resistance against closure for the T90‐orientation thus requiring a  larger load. The thicker twine results in a larger knot size thus improving the shape of  the  fully  stretched  mesh  in  the  T90‐orientation.  Results  for  netting  2  are  between  those found for netting 1 and for netting 3–4.  This  pilot  study  demonstrates  the  potential  of  using  FISHSELECT  and  NETVISION  to investigate and quantify the selective properties for nettings under varying loading  conditions. The preliminary results imply that:  •

The T90‐orientation can improve the size selection for cod compared to the  T0‐orientation. 



The T90‐EFFECT is very depending on the loading condition acting on the  netting  and  on  the  characteristics  of  the  netting  (mesh  size  and  twine  thickness). 

We recommend that the combination of NETVISION and FISHSELECT is integrated  into future studies dealing with technical regulations of towed gear because:   •

Together the methods can be used to quantify and compare the size selec‐ tive potential of different netting including those legally used today.  



Together the methods can be used to improve the understanding of the in‐ fluence  of  the  netting  characteristic  on  the  selection  process  and  thereby  contribute to a use of more optimal netting designs in towed fishing gear.  

18.9 Simulation-based study of precision and accuracy for methods to assess size selective properties of codends (Poster)

Bent Herrmann,  DTU Aqua, Technical University of Denmark 

 

64 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Abstract Two  different  methods,  the  covered  codend  and  the  paired  gear  method,  are  often  used  to  experimentally  assess  the  size  selective  properties  of  different  gear  designs.  But  how  efficient  are  these  methods  compared  to  each  other?  Especially  how  many  fish is it necessary to catch and measure to obtain results with a given precision with  the  two  methods?  Do  the  results  tend  to  be  biased  or  not  when  the  number  of  fish  included in the assessment is decreased? This is investigated for a single scenario us‐ ing a simulation‐based approach.   A special facility in the FISHSELECT software tool enables production of virtual re‐ tention  data  of  a  similar  structure  as  would  be  obtained  in  an  experimental  fishing  process using a twin trawl design where the test codend also has a small mesh size  cover  codend.  For  each  length  class  the  number  of  fish  in  three  different  compart‐ ments: test codend, cover codend and control codend was obtained. To estimate the  size‐selective properties of the test codend two different methods were applied: cov‐ ered  codend  (using  data  in  test  and  cover)  and  paired  gear  (using  data  in  test  and  control). Data for single hauls were analyzed according to the procedures described  in ICES report 215. First a baseline haul containing 10000 fish was simulated contain‐ ing  more  than  250  fish  in  each  length  class  thus  minimizing  binomial  effects  that  dominates when length classes only contain a small number of fish each as would be  the case with very limited catch or heavy subsampling. With the FISHSELECT soft‐ ware tool the baseline haul was used to produce subsamples from each compartment.  For each subsample rate 500 repeated samples were drawn from the full sample. The  simulations were performed for cod in a 100 mm mesh size diamond mesh codend to  produce realistic selection results. 2 x sd was applied to estimate the 95% confidence  bands  for  L50  and SR.  Equal  fraction  subsampling was  performed,  that  is, sub.  rate  90% means that 10% (100 ‐ 90) of the fish in the test, cover and control were each ran‐ domly  selected  and  included  in  the  estimation  of  L50  and  SR  in  the  individual  “hauls”.   Because the obtained results are only based on one simulation scenario results can be  different  for  other  scenarios.  Definitive  conclusions  will  require  a  more  comprehen‐ sive study to be carried out. Likewise uncertainties in the relative sampling rates be‐ tween cover and test are not included. But the following observations can be made:  

 



To  obtain  the  same  precision  for L50 and  SR  the  covered  codend  method  requires  much  fewer  fish  to  be  caught  and  measured  than  the  paired  method. 



The covered method produces unbiased mean results for L50, while mean  SR tends to be biased slightly downwards for small amounts of fish. 



For  the  paired  method  mean  SR  tends  to  be  increasingly  biased  down‐ wards when estimates are based on fewer fish. 



The P‐value alone is a poor indicator for the quality of the estimates of L50  and SR since it (as expected) tends to increase as the data gets weaker (es‐ timates based on fewer fish). Contrary does the R2‐value tends to decrease  as data gets weaker. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

19

| 65

National Reports The  contents  of  the  individual  National  reports  are  NOT  discussed  fully  by  the  group, and as such they do not necessarily reflect the views of the WGFTFB. 

19.1 Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research EU-project: “Development of fishing Gears with Reduced Effects on the Environment” (DEGREE) (Contract SSP8-CT-2004–022576)

This projects aims at the investigation of ways of reducing the environmental impact  of  beam  trawl  fisheries  (reduction  of  discards  of  non‐commercial  fish  and  inverte‐ brate  species  and  undersized  commercial  fish  species)  and  the  possible  solutions  to  technical drawbacks for voluntary implementation in the Belgian beam trawl fleet.   Contact : Jochen Depestele ([email protected])  FIOV-project: “Alternative beam trawl"

This projects aims at the investigation of reducing the environmental impact of beam  trawl fisheries (reduction of discards of non‐commercial fish and invertebrate species  and undersized commercial fish species) and reduction of fuel consumption. Several  technical  modifications  are  combined  in  the  beam  trawl  such  as  a  benthos  release  panel, more selective codends, large meshes in the top panel, lighter chains and roller  gear. A voluntary experimental phase and a voluntary uptake by the industry is en‐ visaged.  Already  an  industry  working  group  has  been  established  with  trials  on  board commercial vessels. Contact: Hans Polet ([email protected])  National project: “Evaluation of the ecosystem effects of Trammel net and Beam trawl fisheries at the Belgian Continental Shelf” (WAKO) [Work package within the project “Innovation Centre Sustainable and Ecological Fisheries” (project° VIS/02/B/05/DIV)]

This project aims at the investigation of the ecosystem effects of trammel net fisheries  for sole and beam trawl fisheries for flatfish at the Belgian Continental Shelf. Existing  data  from  several  Belgian  institutes  and  a  literature  review  have  been  conducted  to  investigate the possibilities for an integrated evaluation of fishing impacts of different  fishing  methods.  Three  ecosystem  components  were  under  consideration:  benthic  invertebrates,  seabirds  and  marine  mammals.  Contact:  Jochen  Depestele  ([email protected])  National Project “Trammel- and gill net fishing, traps and pots” (project°

VIS/07/B/01/DIV) This project aims at the testing of various static gear, traps and pots in order to de‐ termine the possibilities of multi‐purpose, alternative fishing methods. The fishermen  need to be able to diversify throughout the year to target various species at optimum  times  of  the year.  Protecting  spawning  periods, reduction  of  bycatch  and  selectivity  are  important.  By  means  of  a  broad  range  of  various  static  gears,  fisherman  will  be  able to be flexible for the whole year and change fisheries depending on market de‐ mand. By means of exploring these fishing methods, we can offer an alternative for  beam  trawl  fishing  and  attract  new  investors,  which  is  essential  for  the  basis  of  a  whole new versatile and profitable fishing fleet.  

 

66 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Additional funding for five years has been requested to extend this project and have  sought  other  external  partners  regarding  further  development.  Contact:  Dirk  Ver‐ haeghe ([email protected]).  Project alternative fisheries (projectn°VIS/02/B/07/DIVb)

Contact : Kris Van Craeynest ([email protected]).   National Project: “The impact of fishing gear on fish quality” (traditional versus alternative beam trawl) – (project° VIS /07/B/02/DIV)

This project aims to verify if sole and whiting caught with an alternative beam trawl  (at  least  equipped  with  a  T‐90  net  or  benthos  release  panel)  are  of  a  better  quality  than these caught with a conventional beam trawl. The basis of comparing will be the  “Quality Index method”, PH‐ and Total volatile base analysis and the “Injury Index  Method” under development.  There is a growing opposition against beam trawl fishing so every bit of upgrading  and improvement of this fishing method needs to be verified before switching over to  alternative  methods.  The  consumer  market  is  demanding  improved  fish  quality  linked to sustainable fisheries where upgrading efforts have been already carried out.  Additional funding for five years has been requested to extend this project and have  sought  other  external  partners  regarding  further  development.  Contact:  Dirk  Ver‐ haeghe ([email protected]).  National Project: “Development and demonstration of a species-selective electroshrimp trawl for the brown shrimp fishery with the focus on the reduction of discards and the environmental impact” [“PULSKOR” (project number VIS/05JE/01/DIV)]

The  discarding  practices  associated  with  the  brown  shrimp  fishery  have  been  re‐ garded as a problem for many years. The poor selectivity of the small mesh nets used  produces very high amounts of unwanted bycatch. Consequently the implementation  of  adequate  selectivity  enhancing  measures  should  result  in  both  ecological  and  commercial improvements.   This  national  project  was  set  up  to  investigate  the  potential  of  electric  pulses  as  a  means  to  develop  a  species‐selective  electro‐shrimp  trawl.  This  new  type  of  fishing  gear focuses on the reduction of unwanted bycatch, the reduction/elimination of bot‐ tom contact and the improvement of catch‐quality.   Contact: Bart Verschueren ([email protected])  National Project: Evaluation of climate change impacts and adaptation responses for marine activities (CLIMAR)

The North Sea Ecosystem is characterized by high productivity and highly diversified  habitats but also by an intensive use. As a consequence the vulnerability of the ecologi‐ cal, social and economic community formed by the North Sea is high (in terms of risk  on damage) for climate change. This calls for a sustainable approach when address‐ ing climate change issues in our North Sea.  Research and modelling will be carried out to differentiate the primary impacts of cli‐ mate  change  from  the  natural  evolution  at  the  North  Sea  scale.  These  primary  im‐ pacts include sea level rise, increased storminess, possible increased rainfall, erosion,  temperature changes,  salinity,  etc.  Then  secondary  impacts  of climate  change both  on  the ecological system of the North Sea as well as on social‐economic activities will be  assessed.  Two  extensive  case‐studies  (coastal  flooding,  fisheries  sector)  have  high  ex‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 67

trapolation potential towards the global North Sea environment. Adaptive measures  will  be  formulated  both  for  the  ecosystem  as  well as  for  the  other  marine activities.  Based on in‐depth application for the two above mentioned case‐studies, an evalua‐ tion  tool  will  be  developed  to  assess  the  impact  of  these  measures  according  to  the  principles of sustainable development. Using parallel integrated assessment and pol‐ icy & legal evaluation, recommendations will be formulated towards North Sea future  policy. ILVO‐Fisheries will be responsible for the development of the impacts of cli‐ mate  changes  on  the  fisheries  sector,  the  development/evaluation/extrapolation  of  different scenarios and adaptation measures for the Belgian fleet, and the formula‐ tion of a series of recommendations.   Contact: Els Vanderperren ([email protected])  National Project:”Outrigger II”

The ILVO‐institute was asked by the “Belgian foundation for sustainable fishery de‐ velopment” to analyse and study the outrigger fishing method as a feasible and eco‐ nomical alternative for the beam trawl fishery.  Although  the  results  of  the  “Outrigger  I”  project  were  very  promising,  it  should  be  taken into account that the fishing method by means of otter boards is quite complex  with respect to rigging and preparation involved and demands quite a lot of expertise  from the skipper and crew in order to be made profitable.  In  order  to  inform  the  Belgian  beam  trawl  fleet  accordingly  about  the  “outrigger‐ system”  and  to  offer  the  possibility  to  switch  over  to  this  gear  either  depending,  a  follow‐up  project  “Outrigger  II‐  introducing  outrigging  with  otter  boards  fishing  in  the beam trawl fleet with the main objective to reduce fuel consumption”.   Contact: Els Vanderperren ([email protected])  19.2 Canada Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland Longlining through the Ice:

Winter  longlining  for  Greenland  halibut  (turbot)  is  continuing  in  the  Baffin  Island  Region  of  the  Canadian  Arctic.  Gear  developments  and  operational  techniques  are  being  refined  and  taught  to  the  Inuit.  Catch  rates  are  now  commercially  viable  but  developments in handling, processing, and export are still ongoing.   Contact: Philip Walsh ([email protected]).  Low Profile Trawl for Northern Shrimp:

Earlier results using a multi‐level trawl revealed strong variation in the vertical den‐ sity  distribution  of  shrimp  in  the  mouth  of  conventional  trawls  used  in  Newfound‐ land and Labrador waters. The results lead to the subsequent design and flume tank  testing of new low‐profile wide‐opening trawl designs for both the inshore and off‐ shore  fleets.  A  full‐scale  prototype  has  been  constructed  for  the  inshore  region  and  will be tested this summer.   Contact: Harold DeLouche ([email protected]). 

 

68 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Seabed Friendly Shrimp Trawls:

Design  and  testing  is  currently  underway  on  several  modifications  for  offshore  shrimp trawls to reduce their downward footprint on the seabed. Several models are  being tested in the flume tank and sea trials are expected later this year.   Contact: Harold DeLouche ([email protected]).  Cod potting:

Thirty pots were given to 6 harvesters to use during their commercial operations in  2007. These harvesters fished from Sept to Nov with as much as 4050 lbs harvested in  nine pots. On November 23, 2007 a demonstration was held in Petley, Newfoundland  where  individuals  could  come  and  look  at  pots  during  fishing  operations.  Govern‐ ment groups, fishing company representatives and harvesters attended. Pots will re‐ main  with  harvesters  for  the  2008  season  with  continued  demonstrations.  A  professionally produced promotional video is currently in development.   Contact: Philip Walsh ([email protected]).  Escape Mechanisms in Snow Crab Traps:

Based on the results of earlier experiments, escape mechanisms were introduced into  the commercial snow crab fishery on an experimental basis in 2005, 2006, and 2007.  Catch  data  continues  to  show  that  installing  mechanisms  around  the  bottom  of  the  trap results in reduced numbers of under‐sized crab being caught and discarded. The  program  has  been  expanded  and  a  total  of  36  harvesters  in  25  communities  will  evaluate  during  the  2008  season.  A  professionally  produced  promotional  video  is  currently in development.   Contact: Paul Winger ([email protected]).  Plastic Barriers in Snow Crab Traps:

The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using plastic barriers (i.e.,  collars) to reduce the incidental capture of white snow crab in the summer commer‐ cial  fishery  in  Crab  Fishing  Area  (CFA)  19  located  in  the  southwestern  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence. Secondary objectives included an examination of the reduction of soft shell  and sub‐legal hard snow crab. Catches in traps fitted with 12, 18, and 24 cm high col‐ lars  were  compared  along  with  catches  in  non‐collared  traditional  and  small  mesh  (control) traps. It was concluded that plastic collars are not a suitable barrier to soft or  white shell snow crab; however they did prove to be effective at reducing the inciden‐ tal capture of undersized snow crab.   Contact: Wade Hiscock ([email protected])  Fisheries and Oceans Canada Neutrally Buoyant Rope:

Experimental rope with a specific gravity close to that of water was monitored for its  ability to avoid turtle and other marine animal entanglements during the 2007 whelk  pot fishery in NAFO Subdivision 3Ps. The rope was also examined for overall fishing  effectiveness. During this year’s project, no turtle or large marine mammals were en‐ tangled, nor sighted by the observer, in the area of the St. Pierre Bank. The sample set  was relatively small considering there were three observed fishing trips on one vessel  from August 12 – September 10, 2007. Catch rate differences were not significant and  the rope handled as well as the harvester’s regular polypropylene rope.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 69

Contact: Judy Dwyer ([email protected]‐mpo.gc.ca).   19.3 Denmark Activities  in  2007  have  mainly  been  embedded  in  nationally  coordinated  projects,  with particular focus on selectivity in commercial trawls.  A  national  project;  SELTRA  was  funded  by  DFFE  in  collaboration  with  the  Danish  Fishermen’s Association to further improve selectivity of bottom trawl fisheries. The  project runs in 2006–2008 and gear from Nephrops and whitefish fisheries are investi‐ gated.  In  2007  several  designs  of  species  selective  Nephrops  trawls  and  codends  including  T90 were tested in flume tank and during sea trials. Furthermore will, the properties  of a T90 cod‐end be tested in flume tank using stereo vision technique. The projected  will be completed in 2008.  DIFRES participates in the EU project; DEGREE which aims at reducing the environ‐ mental impact of benthic fisheries. In 2007, pilot studies of a modified oyster dredge  were  carried  out  in  collaboration  with  the  fishing  industry.  Further  studies  on  the  selectivity of the dredge and its impact on the benthos will be investigated in 2008.  In  order  to  achieve  a  better  understanding  of  the  selectivity  process  determined  by  the  relationship  between  fish  morphology  and  mesh  configuration,  a  multidiscipli‐ nary  project  (FISHSELECT)  was  initiated  in  2006.  It  involves  investigation  of  fish  morphology,  testing  of  different  mesh  shapes  and  sizes  in  relation  to  different  fish  species, and simulation of gear selectivity. Major activity in 2007 was data collection  for:  cod,  haddock,  plaice,  sole,  lemon  sole,  turbot  and  nephrops.  Concurrently  with  the data collection was the methodology and tools improved and extended. The na‐ tionally  funded  project  was  completed  in  2007.  International  collaboration  with  the  University of Tromsø (Norway) was initiated.  19.4 Faroe Islands Kristian Zachariassen ([email protected]) and Bjarti Thomsen ([email protected]) Faroese Fisheries Laboratory P. O. Box 3051, FO-110 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. Impact of scallop dredging

Investigations  of  the  impact  of  scallop  dredging  on  benthic  communities  began  in  2005. The investigation is carried out on a scallop area that has been closed for scallop  dredging except for the years 1990–91. The size of the area is ca.100 km2 and is situ‐ ated north of the Islands. Samples by grab, triangular dredge and commercial dredge  as well as video have been taken all around the area. After sampling the area will be  open for commercial scallop dredging for about three years. After this period the area  will be investigated again and samples before and after dredging will be compared.  There has also been some experimental dredging carried out to see the direct effect of  dredging. The first result will be accessible by mid‐2009.  Groundgear development

Experiments to reduce the impact on the bottom from trawl groundgears have been  carried out in recent years mainly using underwater video observations. This work is  now integrated in the EU project ʹDEGREEʹ. Experiments with a combined plate gear  with  rolling  bobbins  have  been  carried  out  on  Norwegian  research  and  commercial 

 

70 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

vessels in 2007. The final concept will be tested on the final DEGREE cruise onboard  on F/V “G. O. Sars” in October 2008.  Pelagic trawl research

A  three‐year  project  has  been  initiated  to  study  fish  behaviour  in  pelagic  trawls  in  relation to water flow and geometry. This project will be undertaken in close coopera‐ tion with Icelandic and Norwegian institutes. The main aim of this project is to opti‐ mize  trawl  design  with  regard  to  water  flow  and  fish  behaviour.  Trials  have  been  completed in 2007 and 2008, where flow inside large blue whiting trawls was meas‐ ured using ADCP technology. Preliminary results show that in trawls with long and  heavy codends there is a reduction of water speed just in front of the codend.  Size sorting grid for shrimps

In  a  project  together  with  the  trawl  factory  Vonin  Ltd,  Canadian  scientists  and  trawler owners in Canada and Greenland have experimented with size sorting grids.  These experiments were carried out in Canadian and Greenlandic waters.  A full scale version of the grid system was first tested in the flume tank in St. John´s  in  April  2006.  The  first  experiments  with  the  size  sorting  grids  were  carried  out  in  Canadian  waters  in  June  2006.  These  tests  identified  problems  with  clogging  of  shrimps in font of the grid.  A new version of the grid system was tested in Greenland waters in December 2006.  These  experiments  showed  a  big  reduction  of  small  shrimps  in  the  catch,  from  160  shrimp  per  kilo  to  130  per  kilo.  The  grid  tested  had  a  bar  distance  of  10mm,  which  was too wide, as too many medium size shrimps were lost.  This same system with a bar distance of 7 mm was tried in Greenland waters at the  end of April 2007. These tests showed that it was possible to sort out more than 50%  of small shrimps with this size sorting grid. Further experiments will be carried out to  try to make the sorting grid better to handle. Other bar spacing’s will also be tested.   Effect of colour of gillnets for monkfish

In 2005 and 2006 experiments were made to see how the colour of gillnets affected the  fishing efficiency of gillnets for monkfish. A fleet of 200 gillnets with 5 different col‐ ours were tested. The fleets were sampled 21 and 31 times in 2005 and 2006 respec‐ tively. The fishing time was approximately 3 days each test at depths around 200m.  The colour of nets seems to have no effect on the fishing efficiency. In 2007 coloured  lines were tested and again the results showed no difference in the catch of monkfish.  Cod and Greenland halibut tagging

Since 1997, more than 26,500 cod have been tagged on various locations on the Faroe  Plateau. More than 7,900 cod have been recaptured, and stomach contents from more  than 1,800 of these fish have been collected. Analysis of this material provides valu‐ able  understanding  of  the  migration  patterns  and  feeding  behaviour  of  cod  on  the  Faroe  plateau.  Some  of  these  results  were  reported  to  the  ICES  2003  Symposium  in  Bergen.  A  smaller  scale  tagging  experiment  on  Greenland  halibut  and  halibut  was  initiated in 2002. Totally 399 Greenland halibut and 95 Halibut have been tagged and  of these 24 and 13 respectively have been recaptured. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 71

Effect of fishery on coral areas

Coral reefs in the Faroese area have been mapped using information from interviews  with fishermen and by underwater video observations. Underwater video recordings  will continue in 2008 and more detailed mapping will be undertaken. This informa‐ tion will be used in the discussion with stakeholders on preserving coral reefs. Three  different coral areas are now closed for trawl fishery to prevent damage to corals by  trawls.  Development of static gear

Research into the development of fish pots was initiated in 2005 with the aim to in‐ crease the efficiency and establish pots as a real alternative fishing gear for traditional  species  (cod,  haddock  and  saithe).  Fish  behaviour  in  relation  to  different  design  of  pots has been studied using underwater video observation. This work will continue  in coming years. In 2008 experiments will be conducted with low frequency vibration  for attraction of fish.  19.5 France Ifremer Nephrops selectivity (AGLIA 2006–2007)

The  objective  of  this  project  was  to  provide  a  technological  assessment  and  analyse  the data collected from sea trips onboard commercial boats in order to improve Neph‐ rops trawl selectivity in the Bay of Biscay.   Run in collaboration with the AGLIA and commercial fishermen, the project aims at  testing in three types of selective devices meant to reduce undersize Nephrops catches  (<9 cm) in commercial conditions: (i) square mesh panel fitted in the bottom part of  the extension; (ii) cylindrical bar Nephrops grid (13 mm bar spacing); (iii) 80 mm net‐ ting (to be compared with the 70 mm standard legal size).   Results achieved with square mesh panel fitted in the bottom part of the extension

Despite  the  low  abundance  indexes,  the  following  results  were  achieved:  (i)  the  es‐ capement rate remains quite significant (around 30%), though there is a high variabil‐ ity from one boat to the other; (ii) the commercial losses seem to be better controlled  with a reduced mesh size, though this remains to be confirmed as far as small low‐ powered  vessels  are  concerned.  With  regards  to  this  device,  the  results  on  escape‐ ments and commercial losses will be confirmed only after an extensive repetition of  the tests.  Results achieved with Nephrops grid

Almost no commercial size Nephrops escape through the bars of the grid. The average  escapement rate of undersize Nephrops (<9 cm) ranges is around 35%.  Results achieved with 80 mm codends

The  tests  at  sea  were  completed  from  three  different  fishing  boats.  The  escapement  rates seem stable from one boat to the other (around 30%).  The  main  goal  is  that  by  the  end  of  2008  one  of  the  selective  devices  be  adopted  commercially. 

 

72 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Technology creep effects for Mediterranean bottom trawl fishery

Within  the  scope  of  CAFÉ  project  (6th  EU  framework  program)  this  study  aims  to  examine the relationship between capacity and effort and hence fishing mortality for  Mediterranean demersal trawling fishery targeting hake as case study. Various tech‐ nical  characteristics  and  their  evolution  of  the  trawling  were  collected  over  the  last  10 years and matched to CPUE by GLM analysis. The initial conclusion of this study  shows  the  relationship  of bollard  pull measurement  and door  characteristics as  cor‐ recting factors of the overall fishing capacity.   Experimentations on separator panel

Within the frame of the international project MEDICIS several studies have been car‐ ried out on hake (Merluccius merluccius) behaviour in the water column. For this pur‐ pose the effect of a horizontal separator panel fixed on a Mediterranean high opening  bottom  trawl  was  tested  in  sea  trials.  Differences  in  species  composition  have  been  observed but must be validated by multivariate analysis.  Shrimp fisheries CHAMAD project in Madagascar

On  request  of  the  Malagasy  Aquaculture  and  Shrimp  Fisheries  Syndicate,  Ifremer  have  conducted  various studies investigating  ways to  reduce  fuel  consumption  and  improved selectivity, assess impact, and provide training courses. Thus, in 2007, the  fisheries technology team trained the Malagasy Fisheries Commission officers in the  use of turtle excluder devices (TED) and bycatch reducing (BRD) devices. They also  took part in a TED validation trip onboard a Malagasy shrimp trawler.   Workshop on TED in Gabon

On demand of NOAA, the laboratory took part in a working group, hosted in Gabon  in  September  2007,  on  introducing  TED  (Turtle  Excluder  Device)  techniques  in  shrimp trawl fisheries. This gave rise to many fruitful exchanges with the local com‐ mercial fishermen and the Civil Service officers. On this occasion, the results of tests  conducted in other parts of the world (USA, Nigeria, Madagascar, and French Guy‐ ana) were presented to the attendees. The meeting was followed by a demonstration  of the correct installation of TEDs onboard trawlers. Finally, some practical work en‐ abled the attendees to master the use of the selective device.   Workshop on brown shrimp fishery selectivity in French estuaries

In  October  2007,  Ifremer  fisheries  technology  laboratory  invited  some  thirty  fisher‐ men currently fishing for brown shrimp. The technologists demonstrated scale mod‐ els  of  several  selective  trawls  that  fishermen  already  use.  They  appreciated  very  much the fact of visualizing the gear shown in the flume tank and the possibility of  discussing selectivity improvements. The aim was to define and validate the various  models  that  will  be  tested  at  sea  so  as  to  assess  their  selective  performances,  more  particularly in terms of fish bycatch escapement.   ITIS-SQUAL: Pots, traps, and improvement of quality

Motivated  by  the  need  for  competitiveness,  in  Brittany  a  project  started  on  1st  May  2007  (duration  3  years).  It  aims  to  develop  fish  pots  and  Nephrops  trap  fishing tech‐ niques,  and  on  improving  the  quality  of  the  catches  compared  to  trawl  caught  fish  and Nephrops. In June 2007, a workshop organised at Ifremer (Lorient) flume tank was  attended by fifteen fishermen and tests were conducted on various current traps and   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 73

pots with a presentation on the state of the art about these fishing devices. The objec‐ tive was to define the first specifications of traps and pots adapted for use in the Bay  of  Biscay.  Novel  concepts  of  fish  pots  are  currently  being  developed  in  partnership  with the company Le Drezen and will be tested at sea in 2008 and 2009.   Regarding Nephrops traps, preliminary trials have been carried out in the south of the  Bay of Biscay with Scottish type creels, at depth ranging between 100 and 600 m; the  yields (kg per trap) are comparable to those obtained in Scotland. Collapsible proto‐ types are being developed in partnership with Le Drezen.  Experimentation on fish pots in the Mediterranean Sea

To  provide  Mediterranean  small  scale  fisheries  with  less  impacting  techniques  than  static  or  towed  nets,  the  implementation  of  fish  pot  technique  has  been  studied  by  Ifremer  since  the  90’s.  The  actions  completed  up  to  now  have  mainly  consisted  in  simple technology transfer to the fishermen as was done for Norwegian lobster and  deepwater shrimp traps. Since 2005, Norwegian collapsible pots have been tested for  fish on the continental slope between 100 and 600 m. Several technical modifications  have been tested so that they can be adapted to the fleet characteristics (vessels less  than 15 m LOA) and fishing conditions (depth, hard bottom, current). Problems were  experienced with target fish behaviour, pot stability, choice of material type and net‐ ting  colour,  scavengers,  competition.  Last  year,  an  experiment  began in  cooperation  with  fishermen  organisations  with  3  types  of  fish  pots  to  target  Sparus  aurata  in  la‐ goons and coastal waters.  DynamiT software

Several licences of the software were sold during the last six months of 2007: five to  North Africa, one to the Netherlands and, very soon, one to IMARES Institute, one to  Spain, and finally three licences were placed at the disposal of representatives of fish‐ eries local committees so that they maybe able to carry out the project on energy sav‐ ings, managed by Ifremer.  Necessity project – Integrating selective devices in DynamiT simulation tool

As  part  of  the  EU  Necessity  project,  new  functionalities  were  added  to  DynamiT  software. It is now possible to simulate the mechanical behaviour of a selective grid  along with the various netting panels supporting the grid, which constitute the selec‐ tive device. It is also possible to simulate square mesh panels and separating panels.  Particular  attention  was  paid  to  the  ergonomic  aspects  of  the  application.  Thus,  for  instance  the  user  can  assess  the  angular  positioning  of  the  grid  as  a  function  of  the  design of the device.  EU-DEGREE – Assessing the bearing stress of trawl doors on the seabed

The  aims  of  the  project  are  (i)  to  develop  new  fishing  gears  and  techniques  having  less impact on benthic habitats; (ii) to assess the possibilities of reducing the physical  impact  along  with  the  negative  effects  on  the  benthos;  (iii)  to  assess  the  socio‐ economic impact of the modifications versus other alternative management steps.  Ifremer is involved in the development of novel bottom trawl components generating  no  or  hardly  any  impact  on  the  benthic  habitats  (doors,  groundropes);  these  devel‐ opments require flume tank tests, numerical simulations and tests at sea.  At  the  beginning  of  2007,  several  techniques  were  tested  in  Ifremer  flume  tank  in  Boulogne  sur  Mer,  to  assess  the  reaction  force  generated  by  trawl  doors on  the  sea‐  

74 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

bed.  A  first  series  of  data  was  collected  from  the  tests  conducted  on  three  types  of  doors  studied  according  to  several  angles  of  attack.  The  results  achieved  have  been  used to validate a theoretical model designed to calculate the reaction force generated  on the seabed by the doors, according to the fishing conditions. The theoretical model  was validated at sea last summer.  Energy savings

Regarding the coordination of the French Governments plan of action in terms of en‐ ergy  savings,  and  in  order  to  comply  with  the  French  Fisheries  Prospects  Scheme,  Ifremer  fisheries  technology  lab  is  in  charge  of  the  coordination  of  national  projects  on fuel savings, in conjunction with the industrialists and commercial fishermen.  A symposium on the subject was hosted in Lorient, in October 2007, on the occasion  of Itech’Mer Annual Fishing fair. Organised by an Ifremer technologists, the sympo‐ sium  dealt  with  all  the  different  issues  on  this  topic.  Some  solutions  were  put  for‐ ward,  mainly  regarding  the  design  of  fishing  boats  (shape,  length,  displacement,  propeller), the engine (alternative fuel), and fishing gears (trawls, nets). The economic  aspects of the problem were also approached, and the information collected from the  fishermen was distributed.  Furthermore, a project was started in cooperation with the Brittany fisheries regional  committee : two representatives, supervised by Ifremer fisheries technology lab, have  started a fuel efficiency project which consists of simulating with DynamiT tool some  practical  cases  of  trawl  optimisation  so  as  to  provide  solutions  towards  energy  sav‐ ing. The results were validated at sea and more tests will be carried out in 2008.  19.6 Germany Institute of Baltic Sea Fishery

Alter Hafen Süd 2, 18069 Rostock (http://www.vti.bund.de/en/institutes/osf/)  Contact: Jens Floeter, Bernd Mieske, Harald Wienbeck, Christopher Zimmermann  NB:  The  Institute  for  Fishing  Technology  and  Fishery  Economics  (IFF),  Federal  Re‐ search  Centre  for  Fisheries,  Hamburg  was  formally  dissolved  in  31  December  2007.  The  IFF  was  re‐organized  into  five  departments,  which  are  working  in  the  areas  of  environmental effects of fishing gear, fishing technology, hydroacoustic methods, as  well  as  fisheries  economics.  The  group  working  on  environmental  effects  of  fishing  gear and fishing technology is now part of the Institute of Baltic Sea Fishery, Rostock.  The  other  groups  are  now  part  of  the  Institute  of  Sea  Fisheries,  Hamburg.  The  re‐ maining three federal fishery institutes are now affiliated to the new Johann Heinrich  von Thünen‐Institut, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisher‐ ies (vTI, http://www.vti.bund.de).  Selectivity of flatfish trawls in the North Sea

Contact: Harald Wienbeck ([email protected])  The present fishing effort regulation for bottom trawls in the North Sea (EU 40/2008)  reduces the fishing effort with bigger codend mesh sizes (> 100 mm mesh opening) to  86  fishing  days  per  year.  The  aim  of  this  technical  measure  is  the  protection  of  the  weak  cod  stock  usually  harvested  with  this  mesh  opening.  With  the  smaller  mesh  sizes (70 to 90 mm mesh opening) a fishery targeting flatfish is allowed with 184 fish‐ ing  days  per year.  This  regulation  has lead  to  a  shift  towards  smaller  mesh  sizes  in  North Sea commercial fisheries. This is backed by the fact that currently the fishery   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 75

for cod is not economically feasible and that therefore fishermen are now concentrat‐ ing on flatfish (with the prescribed smaller mesh opening). As a consequence this has  lead  to  high  discard  rates  of  all  fish  species  on  the  fishing  grounds,  which  is  detri‐ mental to stocks. A commercial fishing trip on board a German vessel was conducted  and demonstrated the high discard rates for the target species.   In  the  framework  of  the  selectivity  investigations  carried  out  reductions  in  discards  were  found  when  using  codend  meshes  with  larger  mesh  opening.  Whereas  in  the  small  mesh  reference  codend  with  80  mm  mesh  opening  47%  of  the  total  catch  of  plaice  had  to  be  classified  as  undersized  bycatch,  in  the  experimental  codends  with  120  mm  mesh  opening  only  7%  and  with  130  mm  mesh  opening  only  3%  was  dis‐ carded.  On  the  other  hand  however,  the  increased  codend  mesh  sizes  gave  subse‐ quent high escape of marketable plaice. By weight these losses equated to 18% with  120 mm codend mesh opening and 28% with 130 mm codend mesh opening.  Catch efficiency of experimental trawls in the Baltic

Contact: Bernd Mieske ([email protected])  Experiments with a topless trawl (reduced upper layer) were conducted to design a  flounder trawl, which minimized the catch of cod. Comparisons between stern trawl‐ ers and side trawlers revealed differences in selectivity, but generally, a reduction in  cod  catch  around  85%  was  achieved  with  the  topless  trawl.  However,  this  was  also  accompanied with a loss of the target species (flounder) when fishing with the stern  trawler, while the opposite was true for the side trawler. Further modifying the de‐ sign to improve its performance is currently underway with the help of newly avail‐ able sensors.  Catch efficiency of set net and cod pots for Baltic Cod

Contact:  Bodo  Dolk  ([email protected]

([email protected] 



and 

Jens 

Floeter 

In  the  Baltic  Sea  coastal  areas  of  Germany  bycatch  of  birds  and  mammals  in  gillnet  fisheries  for  cod  is  seen  as  a  problem.  Therefore,  a  series  of  small  scale  feasibility  studies  were  conducted  with  the  intention  to,  if  possible,  fully  or  partly  replace  the  gillnet fishery with cod pots:  2003–2004: “Investigating the catchability of fish traps in the area of the artificial reef ‘Großriff Nienhagen’….” joint project by Landesforschungsanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Fischerei Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany, and Fisch und Umwelt M-V e.V.

In  the  Baltic  Sea  coastal  area,  6  “Stucki‐traps”  and  one  prototype  cod  pot  (double  chamber, 30mm, 10mm mesh opening) were deployed. The Stucki trap was deployed  without  bait  while  the  trap  was  baited  with  either  sandeel  or  herring.  The  cod  pot  caught almost exclusively cod while the Stucki traps, caught six additional fish spe‐ cies  including  eel,  as  intended.  There  seemed  to  be  a  negative  correlation  between  cod and eel catches within a Stucki trap. Setting the pots close to the bottom caused  problems  with  algae  and  jelly  bycatch,  and  therefore  investigating  catchability  with  pelagic pots is planned for the future.  

 

76 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

2005–2006: “Increasing the fisheries value of coastal areas…”. Joint project by Landesforschungsanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Fischerei Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Fisch und Umwelt M-V e.V.

Stucki  traps  and  8  cod  pots  of  7  different  designs,  incl.  pots  from  the  Norwegian  REFA Froystad Group, were deployed for 8 months and mark‐recapture experiments  were  conducted.  Cod  catches  from  the  pots  in  the  period  May‐August  were  higher  than  later  in  the  year.  Eel  was  the  main  species  caught  by  the  Stucki  traps.  In  total  around 20 cod pots were deployed in single and also as strings. This small scale ex‐ periment (total cod catch < 500kg) with a limited number of cod pots confirmed the  results  of  the  previous  project.  Additionally,  good  mesh  selection  properties  were  demonstrated.  Defining  the  optimal  deployment  depth,  optimal  baiting  strategy  –  especially  during  the  summer  with  high  water  temperatures  ‐  ,  and  pot  design  re‐ main.  2006:  In  August,  the  Federal  Research  Centre  for  Fisheries  conducted  a  research  cruise with RV Clupea to compare the cod catches of gillnets and cod pots. 50 gill nets  (2000 m) and 12 pots (Norwegian type) were compared. In total the pots caught 15kg  cod; the nets caught 712kg cod, i.e., a factor of ~ 50.  2007–2008: Joined project by Bundesamt für Naturschutz and Fisch und Umwelt M-V e.V.  

 Five commercial fishermen were equipped with a limited number of cod pots, which  were deployed as strings. The first results confirmed higher catches in summer than  in winter, but at generally too low levels to be economically feasible. There is a joint  initiative between vTI, BfN and Fisch & Umwelt e.V. for a larger scale project, which  aims at a more active involvement of commercial fishermen, increasing the number of  pots and enhancing their catch efficiency in cooperative trials.  Discard ban / Landing obligation - Pilot Study

Contact: Dr. Christopher Zimmermann ([email protected] )  In 2008 a pilot study to investigate the feasibility of a complete landing obligation for  all  species  and  its  advantages  and  disadvantages  for  fishery,  science  and  manage‐ ment on a medium‐term began. The project has started with the North Sea fisheries  and the Baltic Sea fisheries will be included in due course.  The main objectives of this project are to give a reduction (or as far as possible pre‐ vention) of discards in the commercial fisheries. This will result in the better utilisa‐ tion of resources and the reduction of uncertainties in estimates of fishing mortality,  which in turns improves the quality of the scientific stock assessment. The other ob‐ jective  is  to  strengthen  the  responsibility  given  to  fishers  as  a  step  towards  co‐ management. The final objective is a simplification of existing rules, which results in  a reduction of work for control and enforcement inspection authorities. The stability  of rules is aimed for (> 2years, compared to 1 year as typical at present), which would  result in better long‐term planning opportunities for fishermen.  This is very much seen as an alternative solution to effort management. For selected  fleets, the outlined management approach might be better (to implement, to control,  to  communicate)  than  present  management  systems  or  effort  management  systems  increasingly implemented in the EU. Therefore, it can result in an increase of fairness  in  the  competition  between  fishermen.  Additionally,  this  concept  will  be  beneficial  for those fisheries, which have already reduced capacities significantly during the last  years in accordance with the EU‐strategy (e.g. Germany and Denmark).  The Key elements of this study are:   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 77

i )

Landing obligations – All caught marine animals, including undersized  fish  and  non‐target  species  (with  exception  of  jellyfish)  have  to  be  re‐ tained  onboard  and  landed.  If  TAC‐species  are  caught,  all  of  these  are  counted against the TAC (undersized and marketable). 

ii )

Management – The regulation of fishery will be performed (at the final  stage of the project) solely based on a) TAC‐and quota measures and b)  the setup of permanent and time‐restricted protection areas for spawn‐ ing aggregations. Both measures are comparatively simple to control. 

iii )

Suspension of technical measures – In return, most of the implemented  technical measures and the days at sea regulation will be suspended. As  a matter of fact, technical measures are increasingly complex, difficult to  control and expensive to be implemented by fishermen. A multi‐annual  stability of regulations is aimed at. 

iv )

Scientific Programme – The study is monitored by scientists, who inves‐ tigate  biological  (onboard  and  market  sampling),  as  well  as  socio‐ economic aspects. 

v )

Possible extension: It may be necessary to counteract a fishery which be‐ gins  to  target  juvenile  fish  (if  this  develops)  and  at  the  same  time  in‐ crease  the  incentive  to  reduce  illegal  (in  this  study)  discards.  While  minimum landing size will be omitted by all means, a minimum market‐ ing  size  could  be  introduced,  where  individuals  below  a  given  length  are not allowed to be sold for human consumption and have to be dis‐ posed via carcass‐processing plant (cost‐covering, but not profitable). 

Approach  This study is built with two parts, which should be implemented simultaneously but  with  different  fisheries/participants:  The  first  part  is  an  intermediate  step  toward  a  change of management strategy. A fishery with proven low discard rates will land all  discards  within  this  study.  This  will  demonstrate  that  for  some  fisheries  a  landing  obligation is applicable with a minimum of legislative and technical effort. The intro‐ duction of a discard ban for such “clean” fisheries has been submitted to the EU. Pro‐ ject partner for this part of the study is “Kutterfischzentrale Cuxhaven” and its saithe‐ fishery in the North Sea. The second part includes the introduction of a landing obli‐ gation  for  mixed  fisheries  with  known  discard‐problems  and  simultaneously  a  sus‐ pension of a number of rules, as mentioned above. This goes far beyond the concept  of  part  one.  Industry  partner  for  this  sub  study  will  be  the  cod  fishery  of  “EG  Burg/Fehmarn” in the Western Baltic and the cod and flatfish fisheries of the “Kutter‐ fischzentrale Cuxhaven” in the North Sea.   Working hypothesis    If more individual responsibility is given to fishermen, it is possible to implement a  sustainable fisheries management with fewer basic rules. In particular, a multitude of  technical measures is dispensable. It is also felt by the German authorities that a land‐ ing  obligation/discard  ban  is  technical  feasible;  acceptable  for  the  fishing  industry;  easier to control; and can be communicated to consumers as a way of demonstrating  good practice. The combination of a) the suspension of detailed technical regulations  and b) the introduction of a landing obligation will result in (after an implementation  phase):  sustainable  usage  of  fish  resources;  increased  individual  responsibility  and  financial  advantages  for  fishermen;  and  an  increase  of  quality  and  quantity  of  data  used for stock assessments   

78 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Underwater observation systems

Contact: Harald Wienbeck ([email protected])   The surface towed intelligent powered vehicle (STIPS II) with wireless transmission  of video and control signals is currently being revised to enhance its robustness and  observation capabilities. An initiative to re‐animate an older 3D manoeuvrable towed  ROV System is underway. This ROV System would allow the observation of net ge‐ ometry and fish behaviour along the entire trawl.  Development of a long range pinger test device

Contact: Harald Wienbeck ([email protected])   Council  Regulation  (EC)  No  812/2004  requires  the  mandatory  use  of  acoustic  deter‐ rent devices (pingers) to deter small cetaceans from bottom‐set gillnet or entangling  nets.  However,  the  regulation  does  not  provide  detailed  guidance  on  how  the  gov‐ ernmental  enforcement  bodies  should  control  the  correct  usage  and  functioning  of  these pingers.   The German authorities wanted to have a pinger control device that allows assessing,  whether a set net is correctly fitted with pingers and whether these are functioning.  Subsequently, there was the need to enable this control without the fishermen being  at place and retrieving the nets.   The device should allow:  •

to test functionality of pingers at sea 



to count the numbers of pingers fitted to a set net  



to  measure  the  distances  between  individual  pingers  fitted  to  a  set  net  (with additional help from GPS). 

An  initial  Europe‐wide  survey  of  potential  pinger  test  devices  was  not  successful  with respect to the identified requirements. Manufacturers of similar devices such as  bat detectors were not interested in investing for device with a small market.   The prototype  A  Danish  company  (ETEC  ‐  Torben  Roenne,  Industrivaenget  8a,  DK3300  Frederiks‐ vaerk, Denmark) agreed to enhance and further develop an existing control device in  cooperation with the Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisher‐ ies (vTI), Institute for Baltic Sea Fisheries.   The  prototype  PG1101  Ping  Go  (ETEC)  was  equipped  with  a  Hydrophone  TC4033  (RESON),  a  Hydrophone  ‐  protection  cage  and  earphones.  Tests  with  different,  cheaper,  hydrophones  did  not  give  satisfactory  results  with  respect  to  the  detection  distance. It was thus further equipped with optical indicators (LEDs) for the detected  frequency of the signal and its field intensity.   The device was thus designed to display the detected pinger signal visually when the  signal was clearly identified. If the signal was too weak then detection was possible  via headphones.   The aim was to reach a detection distance of 400m because this would enable to hear  2  digital  pingers  simultaneously  when  they  are  correctly  deployed  (200m  distance  between them).  The prototype PG1101 Ping Go has 3 modes of operation:  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 79

1 ) The  ʺClickʺ  position is an envelope  detector  which monitors  the high fre‐ quencies and converts them into something that is audible.   2 ) The  ʺMixerʺ  position  is  a  detector  that  functions  somewhat  like  the  other  but it also contains some information about the frequency of the test signal.  3 ) The position ʺAudioʺ is a listening position just to hear what is going on in  the  water.  It  may  also  be  useful  for  detecting  analogue  pinger  signals  of  around 10kHz.  Test setup:  The prototype of the new device was tested in 2007 / 2008 on three cruises (1. Danish  with Havörnen, and 2. German with Seeadler, Figures. 1 and 2). The tests were con‐ ducted with 3 pinger types.   Pingers were deployed on buoys and their functionality was tested from the vessels  Havörnen and Seeadler as well as from dinghies. Distances between the ships and the  buoys were measured by radar and GPS. Maximum detection distance was 900m for  analogue pinger types (Fumunda, Airmar) and 400 m for the digital AquaMark 100.  These detection distances were obtained from dinghies with engines turned off and  some distance away from the mother ships.   From  the  Danish  inspection  vessel  Havörnen  it  was  possible  to  detect  the  pingers  when  only  the  auxiliary  engine  was  running,  but  the  detection  distance  was  lower.  The  same  results  were  obtained  with  the  German  RV  Solea  while  in  harbour,  how‐ ever,  it  was  not  possible  to  detect  the  pingers  from  onboard  the  German  inspection  vessel Seeadler.   The optical indicators (LEDs) for the detected frequency of the signal functioned up  to a distance of 50m away from the pinger. When the noise level was too high or the  distance was larger than 50m, the detection was only possible via the headphones.  The field intensity indicators did not yet function in a satisfactory way, however they  are not required for the purpose of pinger control. Best results were obtained when  using the operation modus ʺMixerʺ.  The tested device is a prototype and final modifications are still needed. This refers  especially to the waterproof design and the simplification of switches and visual indi‐ cations,  and  fine  tuning  the  detection  technique.  A  final  version  is  envisaged  to  be  available in June 2008.  19.7 Iceland Marine Research Institute Einar Hreinsson [email protected] , Haraldur Arnar Einarsson: [email protected] , Ólafur Arnar Ingólfsson: [email protected] . Species selective demersal trawling

A separator trawl was tested in October 2007 for separating cod and haddock. A 64 m  stern trawler with 4000 hp main engine was used for the experiment. The vessels own  trawl  was  modified  for  the  experiments.  The  trawl  belly  was  cut  10.5  m  behind  the  bosom section of the fishing line and a divided trawl belly connected. The width of  the foremost part of the separator panel was 2/3 of the bottom panel. Cod, haddock  and  saithe  were  measured,  and  other  commercial  species  counted.  An  analysis  was  made,  investigating  the  vertical  separation  by  fish  length,  depth,  area  (inshore,  off‐ shore), diurnal variations (night, day, twilight) and mesh size in the separator panel.   

80 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Another survey is ongoing at the same time as this FTFB meeting on the research ves‐ sel Árni Friðriksson. The plan is to film the trawl underwater and then make replicate  tows to measure how effective the cod and haddock separation in those two codends  and if there is any length based difference or different fish species composition.  Species selective Nephrops trawling

Last year a trial with grid in a Nephrops trawl was conducted. This grid, similar to the  Nordmøre grid used in shrimp fisheries, was designed to separate Nephrops and fish  in separate codends. A steel grid with 50 and 80 mm bar spacing’s and a horizontal  separation panel were tested to separate fish from Nephrops in a demersal trawl. Two  codends were connected to the grid and panel. Almost all the Nephrops catch entered  the lower codend and most of the fish in the upper one. Fish separation varied among  species  and  fish  sizes.  The  results  show  that  a  significant  separation  could  be  achieved.  There  are  also  indications  that  by  using  a  Nephrops  grids  in  combination  with  bigger  mesh  sizes  in  the  fish  codend  and  in  the  trawl  belly,  marketable  fish  could be retained, while most undersized fish can be released. More trials are planed  this year on commercial fishing vessel.  Pelagic trawling in capelin fisheries

Information on trawl geometry and capelin behaviour was observed with underwater  cameras in a survey in 2007. In order to estimate the catching efficiency of this type of  pelagic  trawl  used  in  the capelin  fishery, an  evaluation  of  mean volume  density  for  capelin (in number per cubic metre) assumed entering the trawl, was compared with  recorded catch from the commercial fleet. Results showed low catching efficiency of  the capelin trawl. A new design of pelagic trawl for capelin fisheries is planned to be  tested later this year.   See in more detail (http://www.ices.dk/products/CMdocs/CM‐2007/Q/Q1207.pdf).  Sorting grids in blue whiting fishery

Development of a sorting grid system for blue whiting fishery is continuing. In last  years survey underwater filming was carried out to estimate how effective the sorting  grid was for releasing saithe and cod without lose of target species. The results were  clear, of the four grids tested none were effective but from the results a new design of  grids has already been made and will be tested and filmed in May this year.   Effect of hook size and bait size on size selectivity in the Icelandic longline fishery

Published  results  on  the  effects  of  hook  and  bait  sizes  on  size  selectivity  of  gadoid  fish have been inconclusive, probably partly due to a number of confounding effects.  To  date,  results  from  Icelandic  waters  are  non‐existent.  A  designed  experiment  to  measure relative selectivity of cod and haddock for different hook and bait sizes will  be conducted in 2008. Several trips will be conducted throughout the year.  Development of pot fishery in Iceland

Within  the  last  few  years  a  trials  has  been  carried  out  with  large  traps.  They  have  been  used  near  coast  inside  fjords  and  bays,  in  relation  to  sea  farming  of  cod  and  haddock. Ina few of the trials, the small pots used for catching cod as well been done.  There is a growing interest in Iceland in this fishing method both in relation to fish  farming and commercial fisheries on a larger scale. An application for funding to test  traps and pots on a larger scale is being formulated and if funding is secured will be‐ gin later in 2008.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 81

19.8 Ireland Dominic Rihan, Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Ireland, [email protected] EU Degree Project

BIM carried out two series of flume tank trials with model doors to identify the char‐ acteristics which potentially allow the doors to be operated with lower seabed reac‐ tion  forces.  As  it  was  not  possible  to  make  the  doors  lighter,  reduced  weight  and  hence reduced reaction force was simulated by (i) increasing the towing speed, and  (ii) reducing the warp/depth ratio. Many different model doors were tested with suit‐ able trawls attached. This identified which doors worked well at different angles of  attack. All doors were tested when lifting off the seabed as this was considered to be  a more likely event of doors worked lighter on the seabed in practical fishing condi‐ tions.  A standard vee door was then tested in the flume tank, adjusting the warp and bridle  attachment  points  to  correct  poor  behaviour  when  light  on  the  seabed.  This  “re‐ balancing” using adjustments to the warp and bridle attachment points could be used  to correct other doors if necessary. Re‐balancing involves altering the warp and bridle  attachments points in such a way that the desired angle of attack is maintained but  the  centre  of  gravity  of  the  door  is  not  inside  or  outside  the  force  lines  of  the  warp  and bridle.  A  series  of  three  sea  trials  was  carried  out  to  examine  these  practical  rigging  prob‐ lems,  and  assess  how  the  application  of  basic  gear  technology  and  training  can  be  used to help fishermen work existing doors better. These trials were carried out from  the ports of Greencastle in NW Donegal and also Castletownbere in South‐west Cork  and tested standard vee and Bison doors.   A project workshop was held in the flume tank in Hirtshals, Denmark in early March,  at which a demonstration of the “good” and “bad” door behaviour identified in the  earlier flume tank and sea trials was given to the project participants.  EU DEEPCLEAN project

BIM is currently involved in an EU funded study called DEEPCLEAN with the Ma‐ rine Institute, Galway, Ireland, CEFAS, Lowestoft, UK and Sea Fish Industry Author‐ ity, Hull, UK, which has the aim of recovering lost or abandoned nets in deepwater  gillnet fisheries > 200m and evaluating the effects of such “ghost fishing” by these lost  nets  on  these  fisheries.  In  September  BIM  and  CEFAS  carried  out  a  preliminary  analysis  of  whether  it  would  be  possible  to  fit  an  underwater  camera  system  to  the  net  retrieval  system  being  deployed.  These  trials  were  carried  out  in  Norway  and  were successful in that the camera could be mounted and orientated correctly but no  filming was carried out due to technical difficulties with the camera. A follow‐up to  these  trials  is  planned  for  May  2008  off  the  south  west  coast  of  Ireland  on  the  Irish  vessel  “India  Rose”.  Following  this  survey  a  further  4  x  20  day  retrieval  campaigns  will  be  undertaken,  covering  Rockall,  North,  West  and  South  Porcupine,  Rosemary  Bank  and  areas  to  the  west  of  Shetland.  These  surveys  will  be  carried  out  over  the  June‐September 2008.   Environmentally Friendly Fishing Gears

Several sets of selectivity trials were undertaken during 2007/2008 as follows: 

 

82 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

1 ) Trials to assess the effect of reducing the number of meshes in the codend  circumference  of  standard  nephrops  trawls  were  carried  out  in  Au‐ gust/September 2008. Two sets of catch comparison trials were completed  on board the Rossaveal based twin‐rig vessel “Maria Magdalene III”, com‐ paring a standard 80mm x 6mm PE codend with 120 meshes in the circum‐ ference  against  an  80mm  x  6mm  PE  codend  with  100  meshes  and  80  meshes respectively. The results showed reducing meshes round reducing  discards  of  whiting  and  haddock  but  a  reduction  in  marketable  nephrops  catches  although  there  was  a  lot  of  inter  haul  variation  making  analysis  problematical.  2 ) Preliminary work with a flexible grid placed into the extension section of a  standard  scraper  trawl  to  release  juvenile  monkfish  was  completed  in  January  2008.  The  grid  used  was  designed  by  IFREMER  in  France.  This  work  was  carried  out  on  the  Greencastle  based  single  rig  vessel  “Cath‐ erine‐R” during a monkfish tagging survey being undertaken by the Irish  Marine  Institute.  Due  to  bad  weather  only  a  small  number  of  tows  were  completed but the results indicated that the grid did sort small monkfish <  34mm length. No handling difficulties on board the vessel were observed  with this grid. Further work is planned for later in 2008.   3 ) A  project  investigating  the  potential  for  incorporating  flexible  grids  sys‐ tems into the codends of trawls for release of mackerel and horse mackerel  began  in  2007,  following  approaches  by  industry.  Extensive  underwater  observations  of  two  different  grid  designs  was  collected,  allowing  fine‐ tuning of the grids, as well as providing an insight into fish behaviour and  reaction  to  the  grids.  High  levels  of  escapement  were  observed  although  no  assessment  of  escapement  mortality  has  been  carried  out  as  early  at‐ tempts using collecting bags placed over the grids were largely unsuccess‐ ful. This work is continuing.   4 ) Trials to generate selectivity data for a range of codends used in the Rock‐ all fishery began in April 2008. The selectivity of a standard 100mm x dou‐ ble 4mm PE codend will be compared to a 110mm x 4mm double codend;  a 100mm x 4mm double codend with a 120mm square mesh panel fitted 4– 7m  from  the  codend;  and  a  Russian  style  codend  with  135mm  x  single  6mm codend with a 70mm x 4mm PE liner. This work is continuing and no  results as yet are available.  Environmental Management Systems

Working  closely  with  Seafood  Services  Australia,  BIM  completed  a  pilot  project  in  2007  looking  at  the  implementation  of  such  a  Seafood  Environmental  Management  System (EMS) in a number of pilot fisheries. These pilots involved individual fisher‐ men  and 4  fishermen’s  co‐operatives and  following  on  from  the  work  completed  in  2007, an EMS manual has been produced and a target of implementing EMS systems  on 25 vessels has been set. Industry mentors have also been identified to assist fish‐ ermen work through the process. This work is being closely linked to looking at certi‐ fication/accreditation schemes currently being considered nationally.   Fuel Efficiency

As  part  of  an  EU  project  called  “Energy  Saving  in  Fisheries”  (ESIF),  which  aims  to  investigate  potential  technical  and  operational  methods  in  addressing  the  need  for  reducing energy consumption and associated costs in European fisheries, BIM in con‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 83

junction  with  Engineer  and  Marine  Surveyor  Noel  O’Regan  of  Promara  Ltd  have  been looking at a design for a “Green Trawler”. A draft specification together with a  General Arrangement drawing describing a concept fishing vessel equipped for fish‐ ing  with  twin‐rigged  trawls, single rig  or as a  pair  trawler  has been  produced.  This  concept vessel is designed to incorporate the highest level of efficiency available in a  practical form for use in the Irish fishing fleet. This concept, however, does not neces‐ sarily follow the design restrictions currently imposed by rules and regulations both  nationally  and  at  EU  level  but  strictly  on  design  principles  to  maximise  fuel  effi‐ ciency.  New Fisheries

Two new fisheries were investigated during 2007/2008 as follows:   1 ) Exploratory fishing trials for deepwater rose shrimp () were completed in  August 2007 on board the Clogherhead vessel “Endurance”. Extensive ar‐ eas off the west and south‐west coasts of Ireland were explored but little or  no shrimp were caught.  2 ) Under  a  joint  BIM  and  CEFAS  project  an  assessment  of  the  potential  for  developing a fishery for hagfish in Irish and UK waters. The conclusion of  this study was that given the biology and stock structure in Irish and UK  waters it was unlikely a sustainable fishery could be developed.  Waste Management Project

In the latter part of 2007 and early 2008 following on from work carried out in 2006,  the Marine Technical Section set up a net recycling site in Tramore, Co. Waterford. A  net  baling  station  has  been  installed  at  this  site  and  over  20  tonnes  of  waste  mono‐ filament  gillnets,  as  well  as  salmon  nets  taken  back  from  fishermen  as  part  of  the  Salmon  Hardship  Scheme  have  been  successfully  baled  and  transported  to  a  Recy‐ cling firm, Petlon UK. Samples of PE netting have also been sent to Petlon for assess‐ ment as to whether this material can also be recycled into plastic products.   Gear marking

BIM recently have recently begun an EU funded project that aims to assess the cur‐ rent EU gear marking and identification regulations benchmark these against regula‐ tions in other countries and propose alternative designs that are practical, safe, cost  effective but also identifiable. A review of current regulations has been completed  and an inventory of available components for ear marking buoys has been made. Al‐ ternative technologies such as the use of RFID tags have been researched and its ap‐ plication to gear marking will be assessed in due course. This project is due to be  completed by October 2008.   Norman Graham, Marine Institute, Ireland, [email protected] Monkfish Assessment and Tagging Programme

As a follow‐up to work carried out in 2006 a follow‐up monkfish assessment and tag‐ ging survey was completed in 2007. Two vessels were involved and allocated 14 days  charter each, these were the “Marliona” (SO 975), a 32.5m (LOA), 1243 Kw trawler  owned and Skippered by Cyril Harkin and the “Catherine R” (SO 956), a 30m (LOA),  741 Kw trawler owned and Skippered by Cara Rawdon. This fishery independent  survey is unique in that rather than providing a relative index of monkfish popula‐ tions, it provides an estimate of total abundance with the objective of ascertaining   

84 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

how the stock is biologically distributed. In addition to estimating the biomass,  monkfish have also been tagged in 2006 and 2007. This tagging exercise aims to  gather more detailed information on migration and diurnal behaviour.  Celtic Sea Cod Recruitment Survey

This  project  seeks  to  develop  a  collaborative  Industry/Science  herring  and  cod  re‐ cruitment  survey  for  the  Celtic  Sea  stocks  and  to  obtain  data  on  migration  patterns  and  stock  fidelity  of  cod  through  tagging  experiments.  Suitable  areas  and  times  in  which to measure the strength of incoming year class so that a recruitment index can  be built up over time were identified through discussion with industry. In addition a  new survey trawl was developed in collaboration with commercial net manufacturers  and BIM for the purposes of the survey. The trawl was designed with characteristics  that maximised the capture of cod and other demersal species but still adhered to the  recommendations SGSTS. Under the auspices of this proposal the survey design has  been developed and the trawl and associated hardware tested during winter/spring  2008.  Surveys  are  planned  to  commence  later  in  208  subject  to  funding  being  made  available. In addition cod captured using short duration hauls have been tagged with  ribbon tags (~8000 fish) and a limited number (120) with electronic data storage tags  (DSTs) and tagged with high reward ribbon tags. Tagging was conducted in a num‐ ber of key areas, including the current Celtic Sea closed area, targeting both adult and  juvenile  fish. This  stratified  approach will  provide information on  migration  and fi‐ delity  patterns  of  both  juvenile  (pre‐fishery  recruits)  and  adult  fish  as  well  as  help  scientific evaluation of the current Celtic Sea area closures.   19.9 Netherlands Wageningen IMARES (contact: [email protected]; tel. +31 317 48 71 81) Reduction of cetacean bycatch in pelagic and fish bycatch in Nephrops fisheries EUproject NECESSITY (NEphrops and CEtacean Species Selection Information and TechnologY)

The project is finished and the final reports are being collated. A suite of discard re‐ duction devices were developed for the European Nephrops trawl fisheries. Acoustic  deterrents  were  developed  for  cetaceans  in  pelagic  trawling  as  well  as  excluder  de‐ vices showing potential to scare off the animals or release them from a trawl, but es‐ cape rates were still rather low and the conclusions were not definite, and therefore  follow‐up research is recommended.  Development of fishing gears with reduced effect on the environment (EU-Project DEGREE)

Additional  experiments  were  proposed  after  questions  were  raised  by  ICES  in  2006  concerning the use of electric pulses on species not caught that may come into contact  with the gear. Measurements were conducted on the generated stimulus in the facili‐ ties of the producing company Verburg‐Holland Ltd., and onboard the beam trawler  that  fished  commercially  with  the  system  MFV  “Lub  Senior”  (UK153)  to  make  sure  that the electrical stimulus of a pulse simulator to be used in the tank experiments is a  good match for the stimulus of the UK153 pulse trawl system in situ at sea. Tank ex‐ periments were then carried out at IMARES on cat sharks (Scyliorhinus canicula) using  this  pulse  simulator  to  appraise  the  survival,  physical  condition  and  behaviour  of  these  animals  under  stimulation.  Further  experiments  are  planned  on  cod  (Gadus  morhua L.) and invertebrates. A more formal guidance structure from ICES than the   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 85

present ‘ad hoc’ topic and expert groups is needed and will be requested. The Dutch  fishing  industry  has  plans  to  outfit  a  total  of  five  vessels  with  pulse  trawls  and  winches likely beginning in September 2008 under derogation from the present ban  on using electricity in fishing of the EU (EC Reg. No 850/98 of 30 March 1988). This  involves substantial investments by the industry, which will partly be subsidized by  the Dutch government. Further implementation in the Dutch fleet depends on lifting  the  EU  ban,  emphasizing  the  importance  of  a  positive  verdict  from  the  scientific  community. Further work was also done on several other topics in the project, among  which  adjusting  the  MAFCONS‐model  to  calculate  the  effects  of  new  gear  compo‐ nents on benthic invertebrates and relate their mortality with physical interactions on  various types of sediment.  EU-Project Energy Saving in Fisheries (ESIF)

A new project began in 2007 looking at potential energy savings in various segments  of  the  European  fisheries,  with  participants  from  Denmark,  Netherlands,  Belgium,  France, United Kingdom, Ireland and Italy. This project aims at investigating poten‐ tial  technical  and  operational  methods  to  address  the  need  to  reduce  energy  con‐ sumption  and  associated  costs  in  European  fisheries.  The  study  started  with  an  inventory  of  potential  technical  solutions  and  ongoing  projects  in  the  participating  nations.  The  economic  performance  of  a  number  of  selected  fleet  segments,  using  data  collected  under  the  EU  Data  Collection  Regulation  (DCR),  was  analysed  with  emphasis  on  the  role  of  energy  for  individual  fleet  segments,  a  break‐even  analysis  relating  to  fuel  price,  factors  determining  energy  efficiency,  the  economic  potential  for technological improvement, and scenarios for future outlook, particularly related  to possible development in the costs of fuel oil. Examples are given on a national ba‐ sis of research on reducing the drag of towed fishing gears, potential changes in gear  design, components and fish stimulation, as well as replacement by alternative gear  types,  including  static  gears.  In  addition  fishing  vessel  design  and  operation  topics  will be addressed. The study will continue with an economic analysis of the merits of  these technical and operational changes.  National projects

A  short study  was  conducted  on  the statistical  problems associated  with  measuring  mesh sizes, and presented to an industry workshop. This work was done in relation  to the development of the OMEGA‐mesh gauge.   A  project  began  in  conjunction  with  industry  on  discard  reducing  techniques  for  beam trawls. Three weeks of comparative fishing were carried out on FRV “Tridens”  in October‐November 2007 using T90 and/or square mesh benthos release panels. A  major finding is that releasing benthic invertebrates can be achieved, but the penalty  is in  many  cases  that  marketable fish,  particularly  sole, are also lost  to  some  extent.  The optimum solution is thought to be a panel that releases a fair amount of benthos  with  only  a  relatively  small  loss  in  catch  of  target  species  and  thus  fishermen’s  in‐ come. Such losses might be compensated by an increase in days at sea as a bonus for  fishing more environmentally friendlier. The experiments will be continued in May‐ June 2008.  A number of new national projects were proposed by groups of fishermen in the Call  of March 2008 of the Dutch Fisheries Innovation Platform in which IMARES (together  with ILVO Ostend Belgium) plays a scientific guiding role. These proposals involve  the  development  of  hydro‐mechanical  stimulation  in  beam  trawling  for  flatfish,  im‐ proving the catch rate on sole in fishing with outrigger trawls replacing beam trawls,   

86 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

and  the  optimization  of  a  hydro‐dynamically  shaped  beam  to  replace  the  conven‐ tional  cylindrical  ones  in  beam  trawling  in  order  to  reduce  gear  drag  and  fuel  con‐ sumption. These projects, if granted, are expected to start after the summer of 2008.  19.10 Norway Institute of Marine Research, Bergen Unaccounted mortality of mackerel crowded and slipped in purse seine fisheries

Full scale survival experiments carried out in the North Sea in Aug/Sept 2006 and 07,  have for the first time revealed that the unaccounted mortality of mackerel (Scomber  scombrus) that have been exposed to crowding and slipping from a purse seine, may  be  huge.  In  five  parallel  experiments,  where  mackerel  was  crowded  until  the  fish  showed a panic reaction for 10–15 min, the mortality was monitored and compared to  that  of  an  untreated  control  group.  The  mortality  of  the  crowded  fish  was  signifi‐ cantly higher than of the control groups. From 80 to 100% of the crowded fish died  within  2  to  6  days,  while  the  mortality  of  the  control  groups  varied  between  0  and  46%. The experiments show that the mackerel is extremely sensitive to handling and  stress,  and  that  the  unaccounted  mortality  due  to  crowding/slipping  in  the  purse  seine fisheries may be high.   Contact: Aud Vold Soldal; [email protected]  Fish Welfare in Capture Based Aquaculture

In capture based aquaculture, wild fish are being held in net pens in order to supply  fresh fish with high quality throughout the year and thereby increase the value of the  catch, given a set boat quota. Welfare issues in CBA arise when handling stress and  adaptation costs to new environments are added to the capture stress, and the dura‐ tion  of  impact  will  increase  dramatically  contra  traditional  fishing.  In  spring  2007  fishing trials focusing on effect of swimbladder puncture on mortality, behaviour and  physiology have been conducted. Behaviour of cod (resting and acclimatization time)  in transport tanks and net pens has, for the first time, been quantified by use of elec‐ tronic  data  storage  tags.  Pressure  tests  of  vacuum  pumps  onboard  fishing  vessels  used to move live fish from tanks to net pens revealed (coupled with data on swim‐ bladder healing) pressure reductions way in excess to re‐puncture cod swimbladder.  Preliminary  data  suggests  that  functionality  of  a  punctured  swimbladder  is  rapidly  restored, and that swimbladder puncture alone does not lead to long‐term detrimen‐ tal chronic stress.   Contact: Odd‐Børre Humborstad; [email protected]  Effect of gangion floats on bait loss and catch rates in longlining

Bait loss in bottom set longline by predation of scavengers such as bottom lice (am‐ phipods and isopods), crabs, hagfishes etc is a problem in the coastal fishery for cod  and haddock in northern  Norway. By floating gangions 70 cm off the bottom, com‐ parative  fishing  trials  showed  a  slight  increase  in  cod  catches,  decrease  in  haddock  catches and reduction of flatfish and elasmobranch bycatch. Results may be explained  by  less  bait  loss  for  floated  longlines,  higher  visibility  of  floated  baits,  and  species  specific differences in feeding strategies.   Contact: Odd‐Børre Humborstad; [email protected] 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 87

Reduce bycatch of king crab in the gillnet fisheries for lumpsucker

Trials  with  gillnets  for  lumpsucker  which  were  equipped  with  a  70  cm  high,  fine  meshed panel at the lower part have been carried out. Compared to a standard gill‐ nets  the  bycatch  of  king  crab  were  significantly  reduced  while  the  catch  of  lump‐ sucker only reduced by about 10%.   Contact: Dag Furevik; [email protected]  A new demersal survey trawl

IMR  is  working  on  a  project  with  the  objective  to  develop  a  new  demersal  survey  trawl. This two panel trawl is equipped with short bridles (15 m) and self‐spreading  ground  gear.  Comparisons  in  the  Barents  Sea  between  the  standard  sampling  trawl  and the new trawl indicates that the new trawl has lower efficiency for juvenile cod  and haddock, while the opposite was obtained for large cod.   Contact: [email protected]    Development of midwater trawls for gadoids in the Barents Sea

Midwater trawling targeting gadoid fish has been banned in the Barents Sea since the  late  1970’s  due  to  high  catch  rates  of  juvenile  fish.  Due  to  increased  concern  about  bottom  impact  from  demersal  bottom  trawling,  research  is  carried  out  to  verify  if  midwater  trawling  techniques  can  be  an  economical  and  sustainable  method  for  catching gadoids. Low catch rates have been obtained with the midwater trawl com‐ pared to dermersal trawl carried out in the same area, mainly due to the difference in  distribution.   Contact: [email protected]  The University of Tromsø, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science Comparisons between traditional and mechanized de-hooking systems in coastal longline fisheries

Experiments show  that  it is  possible  to use a simple device  to  de‐hook  fish  without  using the traditional gaff. Landed fish are hence without gaffmarks and quality and  outcome  is  improved.  There  are  minor  differences  in  efficiency  between  traditional  and the new technique, i.e. retention of fish with the new hauling system (known as  “automatic  de‐hooking  unit”).  Fishermen  claim  that  it  is  a  great  advantage  during  hauling with reduced labour as no gaff is needed. Instead they can spend more time  in preserving fish quality. The results are reported in different presentations, reports  (in Norwegian) and via fisheries magazines. Further experiments with the automatic  de‐hooking  unit  will  be  carried  out  during  summer  2008  on  live  fish  landings  from  the coastal longline fleet, targeting cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus  aeglefinus).   Improved retention of fish in the Norwegian mechanized longline (autoline) fisheries.

During  2006  and  2007  a  system  comprising  a  hauling  well  in  the  side  of  the  vessel  was tested. The vessel used is one of the most modern Norwegian longliners, the 51  m  M/V  “Loran”.  De‐hooking  is  made  inside  the  well  and  the  traditional  gaff  is  re‐ moved during hauling. The idea behind the technology is to reduce incidental loss of  fish (outside the boat), to improve quality on landed fish (no gaffmarks) and to im‐ prove the comfort and safety for crew during hauling. In extreme weather conditions  the  vessel  can  continue  hauling  the  line  with  the  traditional  hauling  hatch  closed. 

 

88 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

During our experiments the focus was retention of fish, i.e. efficiency and reduction  of incidental loss of fish (and possible reduction in unaccounted mortality).   M/V “Loran” is currently the only vessel with this technology, which is a somewhat  simpler technical solution to the “moonpool” used on the M/V “Geir”. The results are  reported  in  different  presentations,  reports  (in  Norwegian)  and  via  fisheries  maga‐ zines, including World fishing.   Results from two periods (autumn 06 and spring 07) show an increase in catch of 2 to  4% for cod (Gadus morhua), 6 to 10% for haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and 8 to  14%  for  Greenland  halibut  (Reinhardtius  hippoglossoides)  with  the  new  hauling  tech‐ nique. The results are accepted for publication.   Further  experiments  will  be  carried  out  during  2008  aiming  at  comparing  a  tradi‐ tional  vessel  to  the  vessel  with  new  hauling  method  with  focus  on  efficiency,  fish  handling/quality and working conditions/safety for the crew during hauling.    Project Title: Size selectivity patterns in the North-east Arctic Cod and Haddock fishery with sorting grids of 55, 60, 70 and 80mm

Sorting grids are compulsory for trawlers fishing for cod (Gadus morhua L.) and had‐ dock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus, L.) in Norwegian waters at the Barents Sea. Four dif‐ ferent  sorting  grids  were  tested  onboard  R/V  Jan  Mayen  (64  m)  during  February‐ March 2007. The aim of the study was to determine the changes in selectivity parame‐ ters when increasing bar spacing from the compulsory 55 mm to 60, 70 and 80 mm. In  all cases, the codend used was a standard 135 mm codend. This study shows different  exploitation patterns on cod and haddock populations. The conclusions of the paper  are useful in order to help determining the optimal exploitation pattern for a certain  cod or haddock stock.  The results indicated that for haddock there is  little variation in the selectivity pa‐ rameters when increasing bar spacing from 55 to 60 or 70 mm for haddock (2.7 cm  in  the  l50  while  the  SR  is  fairly  constant  around  5  cm).  For  cod,  no  differences  were  found between the 55 and the 60 mm grids or the 70 and 80 mm grids, but the first  two  differed  from  the  latter.  The  mean  l50  increases  from  56.08  to  73.33  cm  and  the  mean SR from 7.46 to 14.28 cm when the bar spacing is increased from 55 to 80 mm.  The selection curves move to the right and tend to lose sharpness, and the 95% confi‐ dence  areas  increase  gradually  as  the  bar  distance  of  the  grid  is  widened.  The  rela‐ tionship between the l50 and grid bar spacing, based on this and previous studies, was  determined to be linear for both cod and haddock. The results are in a review proc‐ ess, Fisheries Research.  Further  experiments  on  the  importance  of  fish  morphology  on  fish  escape  are  planned  for  2008.  In  addition,  the  implications  of  using  covered  codend  or  paired  gear sampling methods for selectivity study purposes will be investigated.  SINTEF Energy friendly Shrimp trawling

The  development  and  testing  of  a  new  energy  friendly  trawl  for  fishing  of  shrimps  has  been  continued  in  the  period  during  2007–2008.  A  full  scale  trawl  was  con‐ structed and tested in a triple rig arrangement onboard a commercial trawler in the  Barents Sea. The fishing efficiency of the trawl showed to be poor with about 65–70%  of  the  catchability  of  the  standard  trawls  towed  by  the  vessel.  Observations  using  small mesh collecting bags showed that the shrimps escaped through the side panels   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 89

and  the  larger  meshers  in  the  upper  panel.  An  alternative  design  with  more  small  mesh in the upper panel has been constructed to solve this problem. More full scale  tests will be made to test this new design. The project has been funded by the Fish‐ eriea and Aquaculture research fund.  Model based surveillance of trawl systems

The  submerged  parts  of  the  trawl  systems  can  not  be  directly  observed,  and  the  available measurements are often few and unreliable. To address this issue, SINTEF  Fisheries and Aquaculture are developing a state estimator based on a mathematical  model of the system. The mathematical model is used in a simulation running in par‐ allel to the real system. The simulation is thus able to improve existing measurements  in terms of both precision and update rate, as well as to provide information which is  not,  or  can  not  be,  measured.  The  provided  information  may  include  any  position  and  velocity  in  the  trawl  system,  such  as  trawl  door  orientation,  wing  spread  and  wing positions, as well as e.g. information about the bottom pressure and symmetry  of the trawl. The model is improved and adapted to the actual system by using the  available measurements. This project is part of a project run by Rolls‐Royce Marine,  where  the goal  is  to  develop  a  control system for  trawl  winches which  can  take  the  additional available information into account. Offshore Simulation Centre, Alesund is  also part of the project, responsible for the 3D visualization of the trawl system. Con‐ tact: Karl‐Johan Reite; [email protected]   Harvesting zooplankton by use of air bubbles

In recent years there has been increased interest in exploitation of marine zooplank‐ ton like copepods and krill. Trawls with very small meshes have a high towing resis‐ tance and problems with by‐catch, and may not be suited for industrial harvesting of  such resources. Addressing this technical challenge is the goal of our project, where  we study the use of air bubbles to lift Calanus to the sea surface to be skimmed by an  oil spill recovery type skimmer, or to concentrate Calanus closer to the surface to be  collected  by  a  trawl  with  reduced  opening  area.  The  air  bubbles  are  released  by  a  sparger system towed at 40 m depth or less. The ‘lifting’ can be achieved by two dif‐ ferent mechanisms, namely flotation and upwelling. Flotation means that air bubbles  attach  to  the  Calanus  body  and  lift  it  by  buoyancy.  Upwelling  means  that  a  lot  of  bubbles are generated to induce an upward water transport, bringing everything that  naturally  follows  the  water  with  it  towards  the  surface.  The  project  has  included  laboratory studies of pure bubble hydrodynamics as well as high speed video captur‐ ing and analysis of interaction between bubbles and live Calanus. So far the upwell‐ ing  mechanism  appears  most  promising,  although  attachment  and  flotation  of  individual Calanus has also been observed, and will be tested at sea in the summer of  2008.    Contact: Svein Helge Gjøsund; [email protected]    Triple trawls with asymmetric fastening of centre weights

Trawl systems with three nets are commonly used for prawn fisheries, and a widely  used configuration has four main wires connected to two trawl doors and two centre  weights, respectively. The centre weights are constructed with rollers to reduce tow‐ ing  resistance.  Asymmetric  fastening  of  the  main  wires  onto  the  weights  has  been  proposed  to  change  the  yaw  angles  and  provide  extra  spreading  forces  on  the  weights. The intention is to achieve a wider trawl system and increase the fishing ef‐ ficiency.  Full‐scale tests were performed with a commercial trawler at a water depth   

90 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

of approx. 260 metres, with symmetric and asymmetric fastening of the main wires.  Several  forces  and  distances  were  measured,  and  statistically  significant  results  showed  that  asymmetry  reduced  the  total  distance  between  the  trawl  doors  by  2‐6  metres. The total distance between the trawl doors was about 180 metres. Contrary to  the intention, asymmetric fastening of the centre weights reduced the total width of  the trawl system.   Contact: Vegar Johansen; [email protected]  Optimization of bottom trawl gear with respect to energy consumption

Fundamental research has been performed to achieve more knowledge on hydrody‐ namic  properties  of  net  panels  and  rockhopper  bottom  gear,  and  improved  mathe‐ matical  descriptions  of  the  hydrodynamic  loadings  will  be  developed  based  on  the  experiments performed in  the  flume  tank.  Flume  tank  experiments  with a  trawl  net  were  carried  out  as  well,  and  response  forces  were  measured  as  a  function  of  the  trawl opening’s width and height. The hydrodynamic loading models will be verified  by  comparing  such  experiments  to  numerical  simulations  with  these  new  loading  models. A new computer tool for simulating net structures is being developed, and  will  be  used  for  this  comparison.  Model  scale  experiments  with  trawl  door  bottom  impact have also been performed, and these will form the basis for the development  of  new  structure‐seabed  interaction  models.  In  order  to  make  such  research  results  available  for  daily  operation  of  bottom  trawls,  a  computer  tool  has  been  developed  for  studying  the  effect  of  changes  in  the  rigging  of  the  gear.  The  latest  models  and  mathematical descriptions are included in the tool, enabling the fisher‐men to inves‐ tigate  how  changes  in  important  parameters  like  weights,  floaters,  door  sizes,  net  mesh sizes etc. influence on the geometry and towing resistance. This computer tool  may help the fishing fleet to optimize the equipment to their current operation condi‐ tions. The project is funded by the Norwegian Research Council and The Norwegian  Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Fund.   Contact: Vegar Johansen; [email protected]  19.11 Spain Institute: AZTI Tecnalia

Esteban PUENTE ([email protected])   Fishing  Technology  related  projects  carried  out  at  AZTI  Fundación  (Technological  Institute for Fisheries and Food; www.azti.es) by the Marine and Fishing Gear Tech‐ nology Research Area.  Field study to assess some mitigation measures to reduce bycatch of marine turtles in surface longline fisheries (project Ref. No. FISH/2005/28A)

This project worked with fishermen to test hook and bait types in European surface  longline fisheries targeting swordfish in the Atlantic, eastern and western Mediterra‐ nean  with  the  aim  of  assessing  whether  they  reduce  turtle  bycatch.  The  trials  were  conducted in collaboration with the fishing industry in the following fisheries: 

 



Greek longline fishery in the eastern Mediterranean, 



Spanish longline fishery in the western Mediterranean, 



Spanish distant water longline fishery in the south‐east Atlantic Ocean, 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 91

Two longlines were set each day, one with squid bait and one with mackerel bait, and  each with alternating magazines of J hooks, 0º offset 16/0 circle hooks and 10º offset  18/0 circle hooks. A total of 124 turtles were caught in the trials — 9 leatherback tur‐ tles and 115 loggerhead turtles. More loggerhead turtles were caught in the Atlantic  and  western  Mediterranean  (36  and  77  respectively)  than  in  the  eastern  Mediterra‐ nean (2). Turtle bycatch was significantly affected by bait type. Turtles were consis‐ tently  caught  more  frequently  on  squid  bait  than  on  mackerel  bait,  and  82%  of  all  loggerhead  turtles  were  caught  with  squid.  There  was  no  significant  difference  in  turtle bycatch rates between circle hooks and J hooks, although there was an indica‐ tion that 18/0 circle hooks were less likely to be swallowed than J hooks or 16/0 circle  hooks  and,  in  the  western  Mediterranean,  that  turtle  catch  rate  on  circle  hooks  was  slightly lower than on J hooks. Swordfish catch rates were not significantly affected  by bait type in any region. However, hook type did have an influence in the western  Mediterranean,  with  significantly  higher  catch  rates  of  swordfish  on  J  hooks  com‐ pared to circle hooks. The size of swordfish caught was not affected by hook type, but  bait  type  did  have  an  effect  in  the  western  Mediterranean,  where  larger  swordfish  were  caught  on  squid  bait  compared  to  mackerel  bait.  Effects  of  hook  and  bait  on  other species caught during the trials as secondary target species or bycatch were also  monitored.  Bluefin  tuna  catches  were  significantly  lower  on  mackerel  compared  to  squid bait in the western Mediterranean.  Nephrops and Cetacean Species Selection Information and Technology (NECESSITY) EC contract 501605

The overall aim of the project is to develop alternative gear modifications and fishing  tactics in collaboration with the fishing industry to reduce bycatches in the relevant  European Nephrops and pelagic fisheries without reducing significantly the catch of  target species. AZTI is involved in the part of the project aiming at the minimisation  of the cetacean bycatch, focusing in the VHO trawl fishery. After characterisation of  the  incidental  bycatch  of  cetaceans  (levels  of  the  bycatch,  operational  factors  associ‐ ated  with  the  bycatch,  seasonality  and  geographical  occurrence),  the  study  has  fo‐ cused in 2005 on the design and test at model scale of dolphin escape devices in the  flume  tank.  Tacking  into  account  previous  studies  of  dolphin  behaviour  inside  a  trawl net, the escapement device has been designed with big diamond shaped orifices  in the upper part of the extension of the trawl net with overlapped small meshed net‐ ting covers, altogether with a rope barrier located at the same level of the net. During  2006,  different  configurations  of  the  escapement  devices  have  been  fitted  to  a  com‐ mercial trawl and tested in several fishing trials in the commercial fishery. Underwa‐ ter  cameras  were  used  to  assess  the  hydrodynamic  performance  of  the  net,  the  eventual  dolphin  escapement,  as  well  as  fish  behaviour  (target  and  non  target  spe‐ cies). The results of the trials shows that the escapement device designed do not affect  the  behaviour  of  target  species  (hake)  inside  the  trawl  net.  The  video  footages  also  show that the escapement device provides an escapement orifice for dolphins in the  upper part of the net that can be open when pushed upwards from inside the trawl.  Unfortunately,  given  the  low  frequency  of  the  dolphin  bycatch  occurrence,  no  en‐ counter of dolphins inside the net was recorded during the trials so the efficiency for  dolphin escapement still needs to be proven.  Development and testing of a semi- automated rod for the pole and line tuna fishery (AZTI project ATM2006CAÑA_CIM).

The pole and line artisanal tuna fishery with live bait requires a large crew as it is es‐ sentially a manual fishing method manually. The aim of this project is to develop an   

92 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

automated  rod  prototype  which  can  substantially  reduce  the  manpower  needed  for  the fishing operation, as well as to minimize operational risks associated with hooks  and physical over‐effort (back injuries). A first prototype has been designed, built and  tested in the commercial fishery during the summer tuna fishing in 2005. As a result  of  the  fishing  trials  with  the  prototype,  several  technical  improvements  have  been  identified and defined in terms of technical specifications. Two more improved proto‐ types  were  built  in  2006  based  on  the  reviewed  technical  specifications.  They  have  been tested in the commercial tuna fishery in 2007 with success both in terms of re‐ duction  of  manpower  for  similar  catching  performance  to  the  classic  pole  and  line  manual operation and of increased safety during fishing operation.  Analysis of the acoustic spectrograms of tuna fishing vessels (AZTI project ATM2006RUIDO)

Vessel noise is an important factor to be taken into account in the fishing performance  of artisanal tuna fishing vessels using trolling lines as well as pole and line with live  bait. This is to minimise fish avoidance to vessel as much as possible during fishing.  The  objectives  of  the  study  are:  to  establish  a  standard  procedure  for  the  measure‐ ment  of  noise  radiated  by  commercial  vessels  using  hydro‐acoustic  equipments;  to  define the noise pattern of different categories of vessels; to define the noise charac‐ teristics that have an influence on fishing performance according to sound and vibra‐ tion  sensitivity  of  tuna.  Different  measurement  operations  of  commercial  fishing  vessels were carried out along 2005, 2006 and 2007, building a database of noise re‐ cordings of the fleet. Noise recordings are processed to obtain sound pressure levels  and  frequency  spectral  composition.  The  project  is  carried  out  in  consultation  with  technical staff that checks acoustically the fishing vessels every year by studying their  air  radiated noise.  The long  term  goal  of  the study  is  to  be  able  to  establish  the  un‐ derwater noise pattern of those mechanical deficiencies in the vessels detected by ae‐ rial noise recording.   Development of a fuel management system for improvement of the fuel consumption pattern in fishing vessels

The main aim of the project is to improve the fuel efficiency in fishing vessels. In or‐ der to characterize accurately the pattern of fuel usage onboard, a complex consump‐ tion  measuring  system  has  been  designed,  capable  of  recording  not  only  the  fuel  consumption  but  also  many  other  interesting  variables,  such  as  the  wind  force  and  direction,  the  exhaust  gas  temperature,  the  rolling  and  pitch  movements  and  the  speed  among  others.  The  information  given  by  each  sensor  will  be  recorded  every  second in  a  computer.  This  will allow  calculating  how  much  the fishing  vessel con‐ sumes  in  each  part  of  the  fishing  operation.  The  installation  of  the  first  measuring  system is being carried out and the same will be done in other three vessels during  the summer. As soon as the system is installed, analysis of the data files will be car‐ ried out so that possible improvements of the consumption pattern might be identi‐ fied.   Design and trial of a new trawl net to reduce fuel vessel consumption in the bottom trawl fishery targeting multi-species in ICES VIIIabd

Thinner and robust netting materials are available in the market for the construction  of  fishing  nets  that  can  reduce  the  drag  of  the  trawl  and  hence  improve  the  energy  consumption of fishing vessels. A modified design of a commercial bottom trawl net  has  been  designed  and  built  with  the  half  upper  part  of  the  trawl  replaced  by  high  tenacity  polyethylene  netting  except  in  the  codend.  Preliminary  trials  at  sea  have   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 93

been  carried  out  in  2006  to  establish  the  working  method  for  the  assessment  of  the  hydrodynamic performance of the trawl system, its catching efficiency and the level  of fuel consumption of the towing vessel during fishing. The preliminary trials point  out  that  there  is  room  for  fuel  consumption  optimisation  while  maintaining  similar  catch  rates  for  the  target  species.  Further  improvements  in  trawl  design  and  trawl  fishing system have been carried out in 2007 and modelled prior to trials at sea. Ex‐ perimental fishing trials are scheduled in 2008 to evaluate net geometry, catching per‐ formance, fuel efficiency and operation on deck.   Viability study on the potential to improve fuel efficiency in fishing vessels of the application of renewable sources of energy (solar & eolian)

The trend to increasing fuel prices is one of the most serious threats that the fishing  sector has to face in the short term. This research project aims at studying the poten‐ tial of the use of renewable sources of energy (solar: photovoltaic plates; eolian: wind  vane layouts; sail assistance) to reduce fuel consumption on fishing vessels. The pilot  study  focus  on  a  trolling  line  type  vessel,  as  these  vessels  have  long  running  hours  over  the  course  of  the  tuna  season.  The  electric  power  generation  of  possible  solar  plate and wind vane layouts has been calculated. Studies are being carried out to de‐ terminate the maximum sail area and describe the necessary changes so that adequate  stability  is  kept.  Apart  from  estimating  (or  measuring  in  case  of  installing  sails  in  a  prototype) the fuel saving achieved by the use of sails as an auxiliary power source,  the roll reducing effect of the sails will also be studied.   Technical and economical study on the potential fuel efficiency improvements of hull and propeller modifications

When  a  boat  is  sailing  at  a  constant  speed,  the  driving  force  of  the  propeller  is  bal‐ anced by the force resisting motion. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the  suitability of changing the propeller and hull appendage designs in order to reduce  fuel consumption, either optimizing the propulsion or improving the hydrodynamic  characteristics  of  the  hull.  A  classification  in  different  groups  has  been  carried  out  among all the fishing vessels of the fleet attending to the hull design and the fishing  operation. A sample of several fishing vessels, representatives of each group, all the  possible  modifications  on  the  hull  are  being  studied  and  designs  of  new  propellers  are being looked at. Although many of the modifications studied will not be executed  during  the  course  of  this  project,  their  improvement  in  fuel  efficiency  will  be  esti‐ mated  based  on  naval  engineering  methods.  Conclusions  will  be  reached  about  the  potential of hull/propellers changes in the rest of the fleet after estimating (or measur‐ ing  in  those  vessels  where  modifications  will  be  carried  out)  the  improvements  in  terms of fuel efficiency achieved with each modification. 

 

94 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

19.12 Scotland Fisheries Research Services

Dave Reid ([email protected]) for the FTFB team at FRS  Selectivity and other work in relation to Scottish Industry Science Partnership and Scottish Government

FRS  are  running  an  ongoing  programme  linked  to  industry  summaries  in  the  table  below.  Funding

SISP  (06/08) 

General Description

Selectivity of North Sea  Nephrops gear using 100– 120mm square mesh panels.    Aim ‐ identify mesh size for  SMP positioned in the taper  which will provide a  compromise between  allowing sufficient juvenile  cod, haddock and whiting to  escape while retaining viable  quantities of marketable fish  and Nephrops.  Method ‐ Selectivity of up to 3  configurations of SMP in two  different codends made from  netting of 80mm and 90mm  single twine. SMP at end of  tapered portion of net within  the legal maximum distance  from the end of the codend. 

 

Conservation Driver

Reduce whitefish  (cod, haddock and  whiting) discards  in mixed  Nephrops/whitefish  fisheries. 

Area

North  Sea 

Vessel Type

Twin‐rig  vessel 

Survey Date

14–28  April  2008 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Funding

SISP  (07/08) 

| 95

General Description

Conservation Driver

Effect on selectivity of  different mesh sizes and  positions of square mesh  panel for vessels of large and  small horsepower 

Reduce discards  of juvenile fish in  gears used to  target Nephrops 

Area

West  Coast 

Selectivity of Nephrops gear  using square mesh panels on  small vessels on North Sea  inshore grounds.    Aim ‐ identify the mesh size  for an SMP positioned in the  taper which will eliminate  discards of cod, haddock and  whiting while retaining viable  quantities of Nephrops 

1. >500hp  Nephrops  twin‐rig  vessel  

3–12 June  2008 

2. l50–250  hp single  trawl  vessel 

Aim ‐ improve selectivity for  juvenile fish in Nephrops  gears. Anecdotal evidence‐  smaller low powered vessels  more selective than higher  power vessels. Method ‐  Large SMP for range of  different mesh sizes  (>140mm) tested on a larger  powered (>500hp) Nephrops  twin trawl vessel. Positioning  the panels at the end of the  trawl’s tapered section. Also  tested on lower powered  vessel to assess effectiveness  at reducing discards but still  maintaining Nephrops  catches.  (08/08) 

Survey Date

 

 

SISP 

Vessel Type

Reduce whitefish  (cod, haddock and  whiting) discards  in mixed  Nephrops/whitefish  fisheries 

North  Sea  (Inshore) 

Low‐ powered  twin‐rig  vessel 

 

Reduce mortality  on cod, and  particularly  juvenile cod 

North  Sea 

Whitefish  twin‐rig  vessel 

 

Early  August  2008 

Method ‐ measure selectivity  of up to 3 configurations of  SMP with an 80mm codend  on a low‐powered twin‐rig  trawler.  Method ‐   SISP  (09/08) 

Trial to reduce cod bycatch by  modification of a commercial  whitefish trawl to incorporate  large meshes in the lower  wings and belly sheet 

23 June –  4 July  2008 

Aim ‐ To modify an existing  whitefish trawl by inserting  very large diamond mesh  netting panels into the belly  sheet and lower wings to  allow an escape route for  juvenile cod but still retaining  other commercially important  ground fish species. 

 

96 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Funding

General Description

SISP 

West of 4 – Windsock  

0?/07 

Aim ‐ to evaluate the effects  of windsock closure on catch  rates within and without the  closed area 

Conservation Driver

Area

Vessel Type

Survey Date

Evaluation of  closure effect 

NW of  Scotland 

Whitefish  single  trawl  vessel 

10–19  March  2008 

Confidence in FRS  survey trawl  especially for cod 

North  Sea 

>1000hp  Whitefish  twin‐rig  vessel 

19 May‐1  June 2008 

Improve  selectivity for  Nephrops 

North  Sea 

>500hp  Nephrops  twin‐rig  vessel 

 

Method – The study will use a  charter vessel which has  worked the windsock and  adjacent area prior to closure  and has diary records of this.  The survey will then resample  these tows to establish catch  rate changes  SISP 

GOV twinning. 

0?/07 

Aim – to investigate the  potential for twin trawling the  GOV with a similar sized  commercial net. To carry out  trials to illustrate the relative  catch rates of the two nets  Method – 10 days trials to  establish technical feasibility  of twinning the two nets,  followed by 10 days of tows  on IBTS and other stations  

SGMD  (SLA) 

Nephrops size selectivity using  grids, meshes round or  square mesh belly panels.    Aim – Evaluate a range of  proposed gear modifications  to allow escape of undersized  Nephrops  Method – Standard twin trawl  selectivity with small mesh  cod end on control and gear  modification on the test net  

 

Early  December  2008 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 97

Funding

General Description

SGMD 

Selectivity of whitefish mixed  fisheries, particularly cod  selectivity 

(SLA) 

 

Conservation Driver

Reduce discards  of cod in gears  used to target  whitefish 

Area

North  Sea 

Vessel Type

>1000hp  Whitefish  twin‐rig  vessel 

Survey Date

  Mid  February  2009 

Aim – to evaluate the use of a  flexible sorting grid combined  with the horizontal separator  panel. The horizontal panel  has been shown to be effective  in separating cod (plus  anglers and flats) below the  panel from haddock and  whiting above. The grid is  planned to allow retention of  large fish from the lower part  of the net while allowing  smaller and younger fish to  escape.   Method – A flexible grid will  be installed in the lower part  of the net. Orientation of the  grid and the behaviour of the  fish at the grid will be  monitored by TV camera.  

  Catchability in Survey trawls

FRS has just completed a 3 year project on the catchability of commercial fish in the  GOV  &  angler  fish  survey  trawls.  The  core  work  was  on  quantifying  herding  and  ground  gear  escapes  in  the  angler  trawl.  Additional  work  was  centred  on  the  GOV  and involved developments of the Levy et al intercalibration design and on ground  gear escapes. The work is reported in papers below.   Jones, E.G., Jones, M., Greig, T., Campbell, M. and Reid, D. G. Quantification of entrance posi‐ tion  and  catch  rate  of  fish  in  a  survey  trawl  in  relation  to  season  and  time  of  day  using  multi‐beam sonar and video cameras. Presented at ICES Symposium on “Fishing gear in  the 21st Century”, November 2006, Boston, USA.   Kynoch, R.J., Peach, K. & Reid, D.G. To assess the effect of a GOV (Chalut 36/47) rigged with a  modified rockhopper ground gear on gear geometry and survey trawl catches using the al‐ ternate haul method Presented at ICES Symposium on “Fishing gear in the 21st Century”,  November 2006, Boston, USA.  Reid,  D.  G.,  Bova,  D.J.,  Peach,  K.,  Jones,  E.G.,  Kynoch,  R.J.  &  Fernandes,  P.G.  Angler  fish  catchability for swept area abundance estimates in a new survey trawl. Presented at ICES  Symposium on “Fishing gear in the 21st Century”, November 2006, Boston, USA.  Reid, D. G., Kynoch, R. J., Penny, I., & Peach, K. (2007). Estimation of catch efficiency in a new  angler fish survey trawl. Presented at ICES Annual Science Conference, Helsinki, Finland,  September 2007. ICES CM2007/Q:22.  Fernandes,  P.  G.,  Armstrong,  F.,  Burns,  F.,  Copland,  P.,  Davis,  C.,  Graham,  N.,  Harlay,  X.,  O’Cuaig, M., Penny, I., Pout, A. C., & Clarke, E. D. (2007). Progress in estimating the abso‐ lute  abundance  of  anglerfish  on  the  European  northern  shelf  from  a  trawl  survey.  Pre‐ sented  at  ICES  Annual  Science  Conference,  Helsinki,  Finland,  September  2007.  ICES  CM  2007/K:12.  

 

98 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Benthic impact of trawl components

This is an ongoing project linked to EU project DEGREE on modelling and filed trials  to allow the evaluation of benthic impact in terms of physical impact, biological im‐ pact and resuspension of sediments  Capacity, Effort and Mortality

As part of the ongoing EU project FRS are working on fine scale movements and fish‐ ing behaviour in the Scottish pelagic fleet, and on modelling the links between capac‐ ity, effort and mortality. Final report is programmed for February 2009.   Other publications from the group in 2007/08 are listed below:  Bez, N., Reid, D.G., Bouleau, M., Beare, D.J., Neville, S., Vérin, Y., Godø, O.R. and Gerritsen, H.  (2007) Acoustic data collected during and between bottom trawl stations: consistency and  common trends. Can. J. Fish & Aquat. Sci. 64, 166–180.  Bullough, L., Riley, D., Napier, I. R., Fryer, R. J., Ferro, R. S. T., & Kynoch, R. J., 2007. A year‐ long  trial  of  a  square  mesh  panel  in  a  commercial  demersal  trawl.  Fisheries  Research  83  (2007):105–112.  Ferro, R.S.T., Jones, E.G., Kynoch, R. J., Fryer, R.J. & Buckett, B.E. (2007) Separating species us‐ ing  a  horizontal  panel  in  the  Scottish  North  Sea  whitefish  trawl  fishery.  ICES  Journal  of  Marine Science; 64: 1543 ‐ 1550.  Fonteyne, R., Buglioni, G., Leonori, I. and O’Neill, F.G., (2007). Review of mesh measurement  methodologies. Fisheries Research, 85, 279 – 284.  Fonteyne, R., Buglioni, G., Leonori, I., O’Neill, F.G. and Fryer, R.J., (2007). Laboratory and field  trials of OMEGA, a new objective mesh gauge. Fisheries Research, 85, 197 – 201.  Graham, N., Ferro, R.S.T., Karp, W.A. and MacMullen, P. (2007).Fishing practice, gear design,  and the ecosystem approach—three case studies demonstrating the effect of management  strategy on gear selectivity and discards. ICES Journal of Marine Science: 64: 744–750;   Herrmann, B., Frandsen, R., Holst, R, O’Neill F.G. (2007). Simulation‐based investigation of the  paired‐gear method in cod‐end selection studies. Fisheries Research, 83, 175 – 184.  Ingolfsson, O´. A., Soldal, A. V., Huse, I., and Breen, M. 2007. Escape mortality of cod, saithe,  and  haddock  in  a  Barents  Sea  trawl  fishery.  –  ICES  Journal  of  Marine  Science,  64:  1836– 1844.  O’Neill, F.G., (in press). Source models of flow through and around screens and gauzes. Ocean  Engineering.   O’Neill, F.G. and Herrmann, B., (On line). PRESEMO – a predictive model of cod‐end selectiv‐ ity– a tool for fisheries managers. ICES J. Mar. Sci.,64: 1558 ‐ 1568.  Reid, D.G., Allen, V.J., Bova, D.J., Jones, E.G., Kynoch, R.J., Peach, K.J., Fernandes, P.G. & Tur‐ rell, W.R. 2007. Angler fish catchability for swept area abundance estimates in a new sur‐ vey trawl. ICES J. Mar. Sci., 64: 1503 ‐ 1511.  Reid,  D.G.,  Annala,  J.  Rosen,  S.,  Pol,  M.,  Cadrin,  S.X.,  and  Walsh,  S.J.  2007.  Survey  sampling  tools: Challenges, Themes and Questions. ICES J. Mar. Sci.; 64: 1607 ‐ 1609.  Sala, A., O’Neill, F.G., Buglioni, G., Lucchetti, A., Palumbo, V. and Fryer, R.J. 2007. Experimen‐ tal method for quantifying the resistance to opening of netting panels. ICES J. Mar. Sci., 64:  1573 ‐ 1578.  Anderson, J.T., Holliday, D.V., Kloser, R., Reid, D.G. and Simard, Y. (in press). Acoustic Seabed  Classification: Current Practice and Future Directions. ICES J Mar Sci.  Madsen, N., Skeide, R., Breen, M. Krag, M, L., Huse, I., Soldal, A.V. (In press). Selectivity in a  trawl  codend  during  haul‐back  operation—An  overlooked  phenomenon.  Fisheries  Re‐ search xxx (2007) xxx‐xxx 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 99

O’Neill, F.G. and Neilson, R.D., (in press). A dynamic model of the deformation of a diamond  mesh cod‐end of a trawl net. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics.   O’Neill, F.G., Kynoch, R.J. and Fryer, R.J., (in press). Square mesh panels in North Sea demersal  trawls: separate estimates of panel and cod‐end selectivity. Fisheries Research. 

19.13 USA Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries - Conservation Engineering Program

Michael Pol (Report compiler) ([email protected]), David Chosid and Mark  Szymanski  Further Testing of Cod-Avoiding Trawl Net Designs

Two flatfish trawl nets designed to reduce catch of Atlantic cod, the Ribas and Top‐ less nets, were compared against a standard flatfish net onboard a commercial fishing  vessel working around the clock. The Ribas net uses large mesh panels in its top sec‐ tion;  the  Topless  net  has  the  top  section  from  the  wings  back  to  the  belly  removed.  The Topless net significantly reduced catches of Atlantic cod and sub‐legal‐sized yel‐ lowtail flounder; the Ribas net showed no differences. Significant diurnal differences  in the Topless net’s catching efficiency for Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, sub‐legal yel‐ lowtail  Limanda  ferruginea,  American  plaice,  and  winter  flounder  were  found.  Our  results  imply  that  light  levels  affect  the  behaviour  and  reaction  of  these  species  to  trawl nets. A manuscript titled, “Diurnal Variation within the Species Selective ‘Top‐ less’ Trawl Net” was submitted to the Journal of Ocean Technology.   Development of the Five Point Haddock Trawl

Continued  investigation  of  this  semi‐pelagic  cod‐avoiding  haddock  Melanogrammus  aeglefinus  trawl  focused  on  determining  the  stability  of  the  net.  Imaging  of  the  net  with a Towed Underwater Vehicle and underwater cameras and net mensuration in  April 2008 demonstrated stability at varying speeds and over diverse bottom types.  Viewing of the footrope is planned for the future.   Experimental Haddock Demersal Longline Fishery in Coastal Massachusetts

Norbait© 700E, clams, and herring were tested for catch of haddock and Atlantic cod  using  longlines  in  a  cod  conservation  zone  during  April  and  May  2007.  Trials  on  a  commercial fishing vessel demonstrated that Norbait had lower catches of cod than  either natural bait, and the lowest ratio of cod to legal‐sized haddock (0.38). Interac‐ tions  of  bait  type,  area  of  set,  and  trip  confounded  the  effects  of  bait  on  catch.  A  manuscript  was  submitted  for  the  2007  Haddock  Symposium  volume  of  Fisheries  Research.   Determining the best mesh size for gillnetting monkfish Lophius americanus

We fished three different (tied‐down) gillnet mesh sizes for monkfish (10, 12, 14‐inch;  (254, 305, 356 mm) in collaboration with a commercial fisherman to determine selec‐ tivity  curves,  and  to  measure  differences  in  monkfish  length  and/or  weight.  Final  field trips are currently being completed; preliminary data show increasing monkfish  length with increasing mesh size.  

 

100 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Factors Affecting Trap Hauler Design and Tuning

Minor changes to lobster gear hauling equipment can affect the length of service life  of non‐buoyant (sinking) groundline used to reduce risk if cetacean entanglement in  fixed  fishing  gear.  Using  a  rope‐wear  simulator  equipped  with  an  offshore  lobster  trap hauler, the effect on rope damage of sheave profile and angle, the depth at which  the rope rides, sheave and knife material, and knife shape are under investigation.  Future Work

Primary  work  planned  for  2008–2009  includes  filming  and  development  of  a  rigid  grid to exclude spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) in a small‐mesh whiting (Merluccius  bilinearis) fishery and seasonal comparison of Newfoundland and Norwegian cod pot  designs.  NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center - Cooperative Marine Education and Research Program, Virginia Institute of Marine Science The repulsive and feeding deterrent effects of an electropositive alloy (palladium neodymium mishmetal) on juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus)

Richard  W.  Brill ([email protected]),  Peter  Bushnell, Leonie Smith, Coley Speaks,  and  John Wang  This study was undertaken to measure changes in the behaviours of captive juvenile  sandbar  sharks  (Carcharhinus  plumbeus)  in  the  presence  of  an  electropositive  alloy  (palladium neodymium mishmetal). Our ultimate objective is to determine if electro‐ positive alloys might be used to reduce shark bycatch in the pelagic longline fisheries.  Palladium neodymium mishmetal clearly altered the swimming patterns of individ‐ ual animals and temporarily deterred feeding in groups of sharks. Individual sharks  would generally not approach ingots closer than 60 cm, nor attack pieces of cut bait  suspended  within  approximately  30  cm.  The  latter  effect  was,  however,  relatively  short  lived  perhaps  due  to  social  facilitation  of  feeding.  Palladium  neodymium  mishmetal clearly exhibits the potential to repel sharks from longline gear, although  optimal  size  and  shape,  distance  to  baited  hooks,  etc.  remain  to  be  determined.  Be‐ havioural  assays  with  captive  juvenile  sandbar  sharks  clearly  provide  an  effective  stratagem  for  testing  and optimizing  the  use  of  electropositive  alloys as  a  shark  by‐ catch reduction method.   MIT Sea Grant College Program Center for Fisheries Engineering Research (CFER) Cliff Goudey ([email protected])   Reduced Impact Scallop Dredge

CFER has developed and tested a new scallop dredge design that eliminates the nor‐ mal  cutting  bar,  using  hydrodynamics  to  encourage  the  lifting  and  capture  of  scal‐ lops. The Hydro dredge design was developed under a $25,000 seed grant from the  Northeast  Consortium  (a  funder  of  cooperative  research  in  New  England).  The  de‐ sign  is  based  on  tow‐tank  testing  of  the  effectiveness  of  various  hydrodynamic  de‐ vices  at  raising  scallops  off  the  bottom.  A  prototype  2.1‐m  dredge  was  constructed  and  observed  in‐situ  and  evaluated  in  fishing  trials  on  Stellwagen  Bank.  Follow‐on  research has occurred in collaboration with the University of Wales, Bangor and the  Dept.  of  Agriculture,  Fisheries  and  Forestry  on  the  Isle  of  Man.  Testing  of  the  new  dredge occurred out of the fishing port of Douglas both in April and August of 2007  in  a  commercial  fishery  for  the  great  scallop  (P.  maximus).  In  these  tests  the  Hy‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 101

drodredge  was  less  efficient  at  catching  these  scallops  compared  with  the  toothed  Newhaven  dredges.  However,  the  new  dredge  was  found  to  be  significantly  less  damaging to the catch. In addition, the Hydrodredge was found to be especially ef‐ fective on queenies (A. opercularis), a scallop that, like the giant sea scallop (P. magel‐ lanicus), the New England species for which the design was originally intended, does  not burrow in the seabed.   Work in the US has ceased until additional funding for development and further test‐ ing can be secured. With CFER cooperation, a 4.6 meter Hydrodredge has been built  by a fishing company in Canada and it will be tested in April 2008 in the Canadian  fishery. Hydrodredge technology is also being evaluated in The Netherlands in col‐ laboration  with  Machinefabriek  TCD/Visserijcoöperatie  Urk  and  IMARES.  A  four‐ meter Holland beam trawl has been fitted with wheels and cups to evaluate their ef‐ fectiveness on flatfish.   Acoustic control of trawl door altitude

A system designed to eliminate the seabed impacts of trawl doors is under develop‐ ment with support from the MIT Sea Grant College Program. The system will control  the height of the trawl door using altitude measurements of a door‐mounted sonar.  Based  on  a  setting  established  before  the  tow,  the  doors  will  descend  to  a  specified  height and then “terrain follow.” The technology will allow the exploitation of low‐ swimming  pelagic  species  and  higher‐swimming  demersal  species.  It  will  operate  independently  as  long  as  the  trawl‐wire  scope  and  towing  speed  are  kept  within  a  prescribed range. Therefore, the system will be useful to smaller vessels without the  complexity and cost of acoustic‐link sensors or an auto‐trawl system.  Tank tests of half‐scale models were conducted in April 2008 at the St. John’s flume  tank. Excellent performance of the system was revealed, both on high‐aspect midwa‐ ter doors and low‐aspect bottom doors. The acoustic sensor, microprocessor control‐ ler,  and  DC  motor  actuators  have  been  completed,  but  further  development  is  on  hold. Our next steps are to implement the prototype system on a pair of 2.25 sq. m.  slotted  trawl  doors  and  demonstrate  its  functionality  in  the  New  England  ground‐ fishery.  Whale-safe fishing gear

CFER continues its efforts to introduce the Whale‐Safe Buoy into fixed gear fisheries  to  reduce  the  entanglements  of  marine  mammals  and  endangered  species  and  the  loss  of  gear  from  buoy‐line  weak  links.  By  including  a  stem  beneath  the  buoy  with  gradual taper and stiffness, the gear is readily shed from whales at low tension in the  line, discouraging an encounter from progressing into an entanglement. Release loads  are typically less than 10% of the buoy line weak‐link requirements under the Atlan‐ tic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan. This is not only beneficial to whales, but also  reduces  gear  loss  from  weak‐link  failures.  Work  will  continue  on  this  innovative  buoy as funding allows.  Energy Efficient, Novel Fishing Systems

CFER has formalized a program to explore opportunities to improve the energy effi‐ ciency  of  commercial  fishing  through  the  development  of  innovative  methods  and  technology. These initiatives range from waste‐heat refrigeration, to passive midwa‐ ter fish traps, to fish attraction and control using light and acoustics, to the recapture  of  acoustically  trained  fish  released  from  hatcheries.  CFER  seeks  collaborators  to  broaden the scope of each of these programs.   

102 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

University of Rhode Island – Rhode Island Sea Grant Laura Skrobe ([email protected]), Kathleen Castro, David Beutel, and Barbara Somers  Bycatch Reduction in the Directed Haddock Bottom Trawl Fishery

After successful field testing (significant reduction of cod, yellowtail flounder, winter  flounder, witch flounder, and American plaice, as well as other species such as monk‐ fish and skate – with no reduction in haddock), the “Eliminator” trawl was submitted  to the World Wildlife Fund 2007 Smart Gear Competition and won the grand prize.  Underwater  videoing  of  the  net  is  being  conducted,  funded  using  a  portion  of  the  Smart  Gear  prize.  In  addition,  a  grant  was  received  through  the  NOAA  Northeast  Fisheries  Science  Center  (NEFSC)  to  investigate  a  smaller  version  of  the  Eliminator,  designed  to  fit  fishing  vessels  with  horsepower  between  250  and  550.  Sea  sampling  will begin in 2008.   Fishery Independent Scup Survey of Eight Selected Hard Bottom Areas in Southern New England Waters

This  project  is  entering  its  fifth  year  of  funding  by  the  Mid‐Atlantic  Research  Set‐ Aside (RSA). It is designed to collect scup from hard bottom sites in Southern New  England,  which  are  un‐sampled  by  current  state  and  federal  finfish  trawl  surveys.  Two  commercial  vessels  are  conducting  the  fieldwork  and  the  University  of  Rhode  Island  Rhode  Island  Sea  Grant  (URI  RISG)  is  leading  the  data  analysis  and  report  preparation. Staff from the RI Department of Environmental Management Division of  Fish and Wildlife (RIDEM DFW) and the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries  (MADMF) are collaborating on the project. The age distributions of the catch will be  statistically  compared  to  each  of  the  other  collection  sites,  to  finfish  trawl  data  col‐ lected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the RIDEM DFW.   Development of a Behavioural Assay to Estimate Discard Mortality of Summer Flounder and Winter Flounder

Funding  was  received  through  RISG  to  conduct  research  to  develop  and  validate  a  Reflex  Action  Mortality  Predictor  (RAMP)  and  visual  marker  index  for  predicting  delayed  discard  mortality  of  summer  and  winter  flounder.  The  goals  of  the  project  include: (1) Identify specific behavioural reflex actions and visual markers of summer  and winter flounder for use as indicators in a RAMP assay/index, and (2) validate the  accuracy  of  the  RAMP  and  visual  marker  index  for  predicting  delayed  mortality  of  trawl caught flounder. Research is expected to begin in the fall of 2008.   Fisheries Gear Research Database

The  program  developed  and  maintains  a  searchable  database  of  fisheries  research  and  outreach  projects,  completed  and  ongoing,  funded  over  the  last  thirty  years  by  various  funding  agencies:  http://www.uri.edu/seagrant/fisheriesgear/.  This  valuable  tool covers information on fisheries related projects in monitoring, bycatch, gear type,  biology, essential fish habitat, cooperative research, and data collection. Searches can  be conducted on one category or multiple categories to view project details, reports,  and related websites.   Interactions between Sea Turtles and Vertical Lines in Fixed Gear Fisheries

A workshop was held to discuss interactions between sea turtles and the vertical lines  of  fixed  gear  fisheries  with  NMFS  support.  The  main  objectives  of  the  workshop  were: (1) to gain a common understanding of sea turtle interactions with the vertical   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 103

lines of fixed gear fisheries, including the nature of the entanglements; (2) to explore  potential  options  for  reducing  the  bycatch  of  sea  turtles  in  vertical  lines;  and  (3)  to  explore ways to improve disentanglement response and reporting.   Emerging Strategies for Improving Fisheries Management

A  workshop  on  “Emerging  Strategies  for  Improving  Fisheries  Management”  was  held  with  support  from  the  Walker  Foundation.  This  workshop  was  intended  to  build upon the successful 2005 fisheries workshop held in California and the impor‐ tant  initiatives  that  emerged  among  the  participants  of  that  conference.  The  goal  of  the  workshop  was  to  advance  the  cause  of  fisheries  self‐governance  by  assembling  both  commercial  and  recreational  fishermen  to  discuss  case  studies  of  successful  management,  research,  and  marketing.  The  workshop  had  an  Atlantic  Ocean  focus,  but  drew  upon  select  examples  from  other  North  American,  Icelandic,  and  Norwe‐ gian case studies. Further information can be found at the Walker Foundation web‐ site.  Sector Allocation as a Management Tool

The  focus  of  this  regional  workshop  was  to  provide  education  and  information  on  sector allocation as a management tool, and exploring how this method might be ap‐ plied to New England’s quota‐managed fisheries. The workshop was intended to an‐ swer  questions  on  how  sectors  function,  and  to  discuss  the  pros  and  cons  of  this  approach.  Presenters  included  commercial  fishermen,  fisheries  managers,  govern‐ ment agency spokespersons, and members of the private sector and academic institu‐ tions. The workshop was held in January 2008 and materials (including proceedings –  when  completed)  are  available  on  the  website:  http://seagrant.gso.uri.edu/fisheries/sector_allocation/index.html.   Menhaden Science and Policy Symposium

A  workshop on  “Menhaden  Science and  Policy”  was  conducted in  November 2007,  co‐sponsored  by  RISG  and  the  RIDEM  DFW.  The  objectives  of  the  meeting  were  to  provide  background  information  on  the  state  of  science  of  menhaden  and  to  gather  information  for  effective  management  of  the  resource.  Topics  discussed  included  menhaden life history, history of the menhaden fishery, current coast‐wide stock as‐ sessment, current stock assessment for Narragansett Bay, and the ecological value of  menhaden. Following the presentations, a panel of menhaden resource stakeholders  discussed  resource  allocation.  Proceedings  are  available  on  the  website:  http://seagrant.gso.uri.edu/fisheries/menhaden/index.html.  Gulf of Maine Research Institute – Portland, Maine Shelly M.L. Tallack ([email protected])  Can Rare Earth Metals Deter Spiny Dogfish? A Feasibility Study on the use of Mischmetal to Reduce Dogfish Catches in Hook Gear in the Gulf Of Maine

Spiny  dogfish,  Squalus  acanthias,  are  considered  to  be  unacceptably  abundant  by  many inshore fishermen (commercial and recreational) during the summer and fall in  the Gulf of Maine. Finding a practical and economic dogfish deterrent for application  in various fishing gears is of strong interest. Industry‐science collaboration afforded  six  research  trips  during  September  2007.  Triangular  slices  of  a  cerium/lanthanide  alloy (‘Mischmetal’) were incorporated into baited hook gears (longlines and rod and  reel gear) and the catches were compared for ‘treatment’ (Mischmetal present) versus  ‘control’ (mischmetal absent). Some reduction in dogfish catch was recorded for rod   

104 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

and reel (~2%) and longline (~9–25%), but these results were not statistically signifi‐ cant. One complicating factor was the high rate of Mischmetal dissolution, which led  to the rapid disintegration of the Mischmetal slices. In situ video footage verified that  dogfish  feeding  behaviour  is  persistent  on  bait,  regardless  of  Mischmetal  presence.  This footage also showed that bait pursuit by one dogfish would escalate to frenzied  feeding by multiple dogfish, with or without Mischmetal. Overall, there is little evi‐ dence to suggest that Mischmetal has the potential to reduce dogfish catches in either  commercial or recreational gear types in the Gulf of Maine.   New England Aquarium – Boston, Massachusetts John W. Mandelman, Ph.D. ([email protected])   The Shifting Baseline of Threshold Feeding Responses to Electropositive Metal Deterrents in Two Species of Dogfish

Due  to  the  potential  repercussions  for  fisheries,  the  use  of  electropositive  rare  earth  metals to deter sharks from interacting with baited fishing gears is undergoing exten‐ sive  investigation  across  multiple  species.  This  lab‐based  study  aimed  to  assess  the  behavioural  responses  to  rare‐earth  metal  variants  in  a  squaloid,  the  spiny  dogfish  (Squalus  acanthias),  and  a  triakid,  the  smooth  dogfish  (Mustelus  canis),  two  species  commonly  captured  as  bycatch  in  western  North  Atlantic  commercial  and  recrea‐ tional fishing  operations.  In  species‐specific  trials,  tank‐acclimated  animals  were  ex‐ posed  to  squid‐baited  hook‐gear  setups.  Either  a  lanthanide/cerium  alloy  (“mischmetal”)  or  rare‐earth  magnet  (neodymium‐iron‐boride),  and  corresponding  chemically  inert  stainless  steel  decoys  were  deployed  just  above  (mock)  hooks  to  “protect” associated baits. In total, 89 videotaped trials were conducted, in which the  response  behaviour  (e.g.  approaches,  flinches,  general  avoidances,  complete  disre‐ gard, bites) of dogfish around the baits/metals was carefully monitored. A nested re‐ peated  measures  design  was  utilized  where  animals  were  changed  out  weekly  to  reduce the potential for learned behaviour, and to enhance the overall sample of ex‐ perimental animals. Relative to decoys, spiny dogfish were significantly more averse  (e.g. > rate of avoidances and flinches; lower bite rate) to alloys, and smooth dogfish  to magnets, when trials followed same‐day routine feedings. However, bait selectiv‐ ity in both species progressively declined in trials following 2‐ and 4‐day periods of  food  deprivation,  whereby  the  repellents  no  longer  had  any  effect.  Animal  density  (either  three  or  15  animals  per  tank  trial)  had  no  effect  on  selectivity  regardless  of  hunger level. Results suggest that once a threshold hunger level is surpassed, neither  metal  variant  appears  to  effectively  repel  these  two  dogfish  species.  The  significant  interspecific variation in response to the two metals when satiated indicates possible  divergences  in  sensory  processing  of  the  metallic  repellents  and  associated  behav‐ iours between the two species.   University of New Hampshire Pingguo He ([email protected])  Species Separation in Groundfish Trawls

A  project  to  test  a  rope  separator  haddock  trawl  was  completed.  A  raised  footrope  haddock trawl was designed and tested at sea. The trawl rigging with its fishing lines  1 m off seabed seemed most suitable for reducing cod catch (by 63%) while maintain‐ ing  haddock  catch  (9%  reduction),  when  compared  with  regular  rock  hopper  groundgear with fishing lines 0.15 m off the seabed. A project to reduce small monk‐ fish in a  monkfish  trawl  is  being  planned.  The  design  incorporates  various  grid  de‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 105

signs to separate the monkfish by sizes, and to reduce small groundfish species. An  international haddock symposium was organized and held in 25–26 October, 2007 in  Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA. Selected papers are being reviewed for publica‐ tion in a special volume in Fisheries Research.   Bycatch Reduction in Groundfish Gillnets

Demersal gillnets of various vertical heights, different hanging ratios and twine sizes  were  tested  to  compare  species  composition  of  their  catch  to  evaluate  whether  a  lower vertical nets with slack hanging and finer twine can be used to harvest floun‐ ders and reduce catch of cod.  Bycatch Reduction in Shrimp Trawls

A project to design and test a topless shrimp trawl to reduce pelagic species bycatch  was completed with success. The topless trawl was able to reduce herring and other  pelagic species without loss of shrimp. The design has since been used by a local fish‐ erman for commercial use and reported good results. Another shrimp trawl project to  modify the Nordmore grid was also completed. Three designs of modified grid sys‐ tems  were  tested.  A  size‐sorting  grid  installed  in  from  of  the  main  Nordmore  grid  was able to reduce small shrimps by 30 to 40 count/kg when shrimps caught by a net  with a regular grid were about 130 to 160 count/kg. A combined rope grid and size  sorting grid was able to reduce both small shrimps and finfish bycatch. Further work  on  the  size‐sorting  grid  and  modified  Nordmore  grid  is  being  planned  to  optimize  the design for maximum reduction of small shrimps and finfish.  Reducing Seabed Impact of Trawling

A preliminary project to design and test a wheeled groundgear to reduce seabed im‐ pact in the whiting fishery has been completed. Further work is being planned to im‐ prove the design including flume tank testing and sea trials.  NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center Fisheries - Behavioural Ecology Program, Newport, Oregon, USA Laboratory investigation of rare earth metal and magnetic deterrents with spiny dogfish and Pacific halibut

Michael  W.  Davis  ([email protected]),  Allan  W.  ([email protected]), Steve M. Kaimmer ([email protected]

Stoner 

Spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) comprise a significant unwanted bycatch on demer‐ sal  longlines  set  for  halibut  and  cod  in  shelf  waters  of  the  east  and  west  coasts  of  North America. In this laboratory study, attacks on baits were tested in the presence  of  2  different  rare‐earth  materials  (neodymium‐iron‐boride  magnets  and  cerium  mischmetal)  believed  to  deter  elasmobranch  catch.  Experiments  were  made  with  spiny dogfish and with Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in pairwise tests of the  rare‐earth  materials  and  inert  metal  controls.  Dogfish  attacked  and  consumed  baits  tested with cerium mischmetal at a lower frequency than controls. Times to attack the  baits  were  significantly  higher  in  the  presence  of  mischmetal,  as  were  numbers  of  approaches before first attack. The time differential between mischmetal and control  treatments and the number of baits consumed converged with increasing food depri‐ vation  (1  hr,  2  d,  4  d),  but  treatment  differences  were  always  significant.  Cerium  mischmetal appeared to be irritating to dogfish and may disrupt their bait detection  and  orientation  abilities.  Magnets  also  appeared  to  irritate  dogfish  but  provided  no  protection for baits in feeding trials. Pacific halibut showed no reaction whatsoever to   

106 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

the rare‐earth magnets or cerium mischmetal. Mischmetal, therefore, may be useful in  reducing  spiny  dogfish  bycatch  in  the  halibut  fishery.  Disadvantages  in  using  mischmetal  in  commercial  operations  are  expense,  hazardous  nature,  and  relatively  rapid hydrolysis in seawater.  Assessing probability of discard mortality in two Alaska crab species using reflex impairment

Allan  W.  Stoner  ([email protected]),  Craig  S.  Rose,  J.  Eric  Munk,  Carwyn  F.  Hammond, Michael W. Davis  Delayed  mortality  associated  with  discards  of  both  crabs  and  fishes  has  ordinarily  been observed through tag and recovery studies or prolonged holding in deck tanks,  and there is need for a more efficient assessment method. Six reflexes were identified  in Chionoecetes bairdi (Tanner crab) and C. opilio (snow crab) that combine to provide a  useful index of crab condition and close relation to subsequent mortality. Crabs col‐ lected with bottom trawls in the Bering Sea were evaluated for reflex impairment and  injuries,  and held  to  track  mortality.  Logistic  regression  revealed  that  reflex impair‐ ment provided the most parsimonious predictor of delayed mortality in C. opilio (91%  correct predictions). For C. bairdi, reflex impairment along with injury score resulted  in  82.7%  correct  predictions  of  mortality,  and  reflex  impairment  alone  resulted  in  79.5%  correct  predictions.  The  relationships  were  independent  of  crab  gender,  size,  and shell condition, and predicted mortality in crabs with no obvious external dam‐ age.  Reflex  Action  Mortality  Predictors  (RAMP)  provides  substantial  improvement  over earlier mortality predictors and will help to increase the scope and replication of  fishing  and  handling  experiments.  The  approach  should  be  equally  valuable  for  a  wide range of crustaceans.  International Pacific Halibut Commission - Seattle, Washington Effect of hook size and hook spacing on the setline catch of Pacific halibut

Bruce Leaman and Steve Kaimmer ([email protected])   The 2007 experiment continued a 2005 experiment where fishing hook spacing’s from  3.5 to 18 ft (1.1 – 5.5 m) and hook sizes from 13/0 to 16/0 were fished to estimate the  effects  of  these  combinations  on  the  weights and sizes  of Pacific  halibut  on setlines.  Results  generally  show  increasing  catch  rate  by  weight  with  increasing  spacing,  al‐ though  higher  fish  densities  diminish  this  effect.  Hook  size  had  little  effect  on  the  catch of larger fish but smaller hooks caught smaller fish. The data are currently un‐ dergoing more detailed analysis.   Determining the hooking success of Pacific halibut on circle hooks on setline gear

Steve Kaimmer ([email protected]) and Steve Wischniowski   In  2007  we  used  a  DIDSON  sonar  to  observe  hook  attacks  and  hooking  success  of  Pacific  halibut  at  100 fm  (183  m)  water  off  Kodiak  Island in  Alaska.  The  2007  effort  observed attacks on 16/0 circle hooks. In ten days, we observed 133 hook attacks re‐ sulting in 45 captured fish. Fish lengths ranged from 53 to 141 cm. The data collected  describe a hooking success curve that is very close to that predicted by our ongoing  stock assessment model, suggesting that the gear selectivity in this area is entirely a  function of fish size and hooking success. In 2008, we intend to collect more observa‐ tions  with  large  fish  on  the  16/0  hooks,  as  well  as  a  set  of  observations  using  the  smaller 13/0 hooks which are common in the Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) fisher‐ ies in the area.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 107

Reducing the bycatch of spiny dogfish by using mischmetal on commercial setline gear

Steve Kaimmer ([email protected]) and Allan Stoner ([email protected])   This was a cooperative project between the IPHC and NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisher‐ ies  Science  Center,  Fisheries  Behavioural  Ecology  Program,  Newport,  Oregon.  Fol‐ lowing  a  successful  laboratory  experiment,  we  fished  halibut  setline  gear  near  Homer,  Alaska  comparing  hooks  with  and  without  pieces  of  mischmetal,  an  ioni‐ cally‐active alloy of lanthanide metals, attached to the hooks. We did achieve a statis‐ tically  significant  20%  reduction  in  the  catch  of  dogfish  (Squalus  acanthias)  on  the  mischmetal gear. There was no associated increase in the catch of halibut. Rapid dis‐ solution  in  seawater  and  the  expense  of  the  mischmetal  would  limit  broad  applica‐ tion of its use as a shark deterrent.   Assessing the effect of swivels on the setline catches of Pacific halibut and bycatch species in British Columbia

Steve Kaimmer ([email protected])   Most vessels using snap‐in gear to fish for halibut in British Columbia and southeast‐ ern Alaska have swivels attached to their gear, either near the snap or on the hook.  During  2008,  we  will  assess  the  effects  of  swivels  on  the  catches  of  halibut  and  by‐ catch, particularly rockfish. Based on fishermen’s accounts, we expect to catch more  halibut, and perhaps much more rockfish, on the swivel equipped gear. It is believed  that on gear without swivels, many fish spiral during the retrieval process, twisting  and weakening the gangion, or wrapping up so tightly that continued spiralling re‐ sults in the fish coming off the hook.   Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife - Marine Resources Program Reducing bycatch in hook-and-line groundfish fisheries: evaluation of the effect of increased bait height above bottom on the catch of demersal rockfishes (Sebastes)

Bob Hannah ([email protected]), Troy Buell   We expanded our study of how increasing the height of angled baits above the bot‐ tom using long leaders (4.6 m) inserted between the lowermost bait and the terminal  weight (long‐leader gear) altered the species and size composition of the recreational  catch off the Oregon coast. Specifically, we expanded the study reported on last year  to include separate sub‐studies of the effectiveness of long‐leaders when angling with  only small lures or flies or with large whole bait, and conducted additional work to  examine  gear  interaction  effects.  Side‐by‐side  fishing  with  long‐leader  and  control  gear  showed  a  strong  reduction  in  the  catch  of  demersal  rockfishes,  including  yel‐ loweye rockfish, with long‐leader gear, with negligible effects on catch rates of target  species (Pacific halibut or black rockfish). Replicate drifts over the same habitat, with  and without the control gear, showed that when fishing only small lures or flies for  black  rockfish  the  bycatch  reduction  effect  was  robust  to  which  gear  was  presented  first.  However,  when  fishing  with  large  whole  baits  for  Pacific  halibut,  the  bycatch  reduction  seen  for  yelloweye  rockfish  disappeared  when  long‐leader  gear  was  pre‐ sented  first. This  suggests  that  there  is a  potential  to  use  long‐leader  gear  to reduce  the bycatch of demersal rockfish in recreational fisheries, but only in fisheries that can  be successfully prosecuted with small lures and flies only, not large whole baits.  

 

108 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Evaluation of selective flatfish trawls as used in the nearshore groundfish fishery

Bob  Hannah  ([email protected]),  Nancy  Gove  (NMFS  Northwest  Fishery  Science Center)  We  analyzed  NMFS  Northwest  Fishery  Science  Center  observer  program  data  to  evaluate the effectiveness of selective flatfish trawls (required nearshore since 2005) at  reducing  canary  rockfish bycatch  in  the  nearshore  groundfish  trawl  fishery  off  Ore‐ gon and Washington. The data showed that some vessels were using selective flatfish  trawls effectively while some were not and the fishery as a whole had exceeded the  canary rockfish bycatch rates projected from research studies and a large‐scale fishery  test. Analyses aimed at determining if the nets being fished had excessive rise were  inconclusive, however anecdotal comments from fishers and net shops indicated that  nets  with  excessive  rise  were  being  fished  by  some  vessels.  A  recommendation  to  change the legal definition of selective flatfish trawls to better restrict overall rise was  forwarded to the Pacific Fishery Management Council.   Test of a combination BRD/sorting grate in the ocean shrimp (Pandalus jordani) trawl fishery

Bob Hannah ([email protected]), Steve Jones   We tested a rigid‐grate BRD in the Oregon shrimp trawl fishery that incorporated a  lower  section  designed  to  allow  the  escapement  of  undersize  shrimp  and  an  upper  section  that  allows  shrimp  to  pass  into  the  codend  but  excludes  all  large  and  me‐ dium‐sized fish. The grate did increase the average size of shrimp in the codend, and  excluded fish well but also caused significant shrimp loss above that expected from  just  the  escape  of  very  small  shrimp.  Underwater  video  showed  that  the  narrowly  spaced  sorting  grid  was  causing  excessive  water  flow  towards  the  fish  escape  hole.  This research showed that rigid‐grate BRDs that also size‐sort shrimp are possible but  that a different design is needed.   ROV survey of soft-bottom habitats affected by shrimp trawling

Bob Hannah ([email protected]), Steve Jones, and William Miller   We  conducted  an  extensive  ROV  survey  of  mud‐bottom  habitats  in  four  areas  near  Nehalem Bank to study the impacts of shrimp trawls on macro‐invertebrate popula‐ tions. The four study sites have quite disparate trawling histories and two of the sites  are  within  the  Nehalem  Bank  no‐trawl  zone  established  in 2006. The  study  has  two  main  goals;  determine  if  differences  in  macro‐invertebrate  populations  correspond  with differences in trawling history as shown in logbook data and to establish a base‐ line  macro‐invertebrate  survey  that  can  be  used  to  examine  long‐term  changes  in  macro‐invertebrate  populations  going  forward  as  two  of  the  areas  continue  to  be  trawled and two remain closed. Field work was completed in 2007.  

20

New Business

20.1 Date and Venue for 2009 WGFTFB Meeting The  ICES–FAO  Working  Group  on  Fishing  Technology  and  Fish  Behaviour  [WGFTFB]  (Chair:  Dominic  Rihan,  Ireland)  will  meet  in  Ancona,  Italy  from  18‐22  May 2009  20.2 Proposals for 2009/2010 ASC – Theme Sessions It is proposed to hold a theme session at the ICES ASC with following objectives:   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

1. 2. 3.

| 109

Case studies on directed elasmobranch fisheries documenting catch levels  over time or changes in fishing patterns   Research with technical mitigation measures used to reduce the bycatch of el‐ samobranch species; and  Studies using other management strategies including spatial or temporal clo‐ sures, bycatch limits to protect elsamobranch species.  

Conveners: Dominic Rihan (BIM, Ireland) and Chair of WGEF (TBC)  Scientific Justification  Fisheries for elasmobranchs are common throughout the world (Bonfil 1994). The life  histories  of  many  of  these  species  make  them  highly  vulnerable  to  human  exploita‐ tion  or  unintended  mortality  and  therefore  the  incidental  bycatch  associated  with  commercial fishing operations, leading in most cases to mortality, is an issue of global  concern.  Historically,  some  of  these  fisheries  have  shown  rapid  declines  in  abun‐ dance, presumably linked to long gestation periods. It is fair to say that to date most  available mitigation techniques used to reduce charismatic species bycatch have been  directed at reducing the bycatch of marine mammals. Elasmobranchs including large  sharks and species such as manta ray are at risk due to conflicts with fishing opera‐ tions  but  to  date  have  received  limited  bycatch  mitigation  attention.  Nonetheless  in  the course of research into mitigation devices for release of marine mammals, reduc‐ tion in elsamobranch bycatch have been observed e.g. Mauritanian pelagic fisheries.  A  comprehensive  review  of  such  work  has  not  been  carried  out.  In  addition,  high  local  abundances  of  small  coastal  sharks  and  dogfish  species,  particularly  Squalus  acanthias,  can  impede  commercial  fisheries  for  other  fishes,  as  large  opportunistic  catches are quite common. Little or no research has been carried out into ways of re‐ ducing these catches yet there is increasing pressure from managers to do so.  20.3 ICES and other Symposia ICES  Symposium  on  the  Ecosystem  Approach  with  Fisheries  Acoustics  and  Com‐ plementary Technologies will be held at the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen,  Norway, 16–20  June 2008.  Co‐Conveners:  Egil  Ona (Norway), Rudy  Kloser  (Austra‐ lia), and David Demer (USA).   An ICES Symposium on the Collection and Interpretation of Fishery Dependent Data  will  be  held  during  the  summer  2010,  in  Galway,  Ireland.  Convenors:  N.  Graham  (Ireland), K. Nedreaas (Norway), and W. Karp (USA).  20.4 Any Other Business From an FAO perspective, one of the objectives for FAO participation in WGFTFB is  to bring the collective expertise in fishing technology in developed countries within  reach of those in developing countries. To this end, FAO welcomes the opportunity  for  WGFTFB  to  meet  outside  of  the  traditional  ICES  countries  and  therefore  would  like the ICES Secretariat and FTC to carefully consider the offer made by SEAFDEC to  host WGFTFB in Thailand in 2010. FAO FIIT fully supports this initiative as it would  ensure the continued participation of those developing countries    

 

110 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 1: List of participants N AME

 

A DDRESS

P HONE /FAX

E MAIL

Abdelhak  Lahnin 

Regional Centre of  INRH,  BP 5221  Agadir, Morocco 

Tel: +21228822985  Fax: +21228827415 

[email protected] 

Adnan Tokac 

Ege University, Fisheries  Faculty,   Izmir, 35100,   Turkey 

Tel: +90 532  6216580  Fax: +90 232  3747450 

[email protected] 

Alain Frechet 

Maurice Lamontagne  Institute, ~  850 Route de la mer,  Mont‐Joli, G5H 3Z4,  Canada 

Tel: +418 7750628  Fax: +418 7750679 

[email protected]‐MPO.GC.CA 

Alessandro  Lucchetti 

CNR‐ISMAR, Largo  fiera della pesca,  Ancona, 60125,   Italy 

Tel: +39 071  2078828  Fax: +39 071 55313 

[email protected] 

Altan Lok 

Ege University Fisheries  Faculty,   Bornova, Izmir, 35100,  Turkiye 

Tel: +90 232  3434000  Fax: +90 232  3747450 

[email protected] 

Andres Seefoo 

INAPESCA  Mexico 

Tel: +523143323750 

Y‐[email protected] 

Andy Revill 

Cefas,   Pakefield Road,  Lowestoft, NR33 0HT,  UK 

Tel: +44 1502 524  531  Fax: +44 1502 526  531 

[email protected] 

Antonio  Porras 

Institute of Fishery and  Aquaculture,  Costa Rica 

Tel: +50622481196  Fax: +50622481585 

[email protected] 

Benoit Vincent 

IFREMER,  8 rue F Toullec,  Lorient, 56100, France 

Tel : +33297873804  Fax: +33 2 97873839 

[email protected] 

Bent  Herrmann 

DIFRES,  North Sea Centre, Box  101, Hirtshals, 9850,  Denmark 

Tel: +45 3396 3200  Fax: +45 3396 3260 

[email protected] 

Bill Karp 

Alaska Fisheries Science  Center (NOAA), 7600  Sand Point Way NE,  Seattle, 98115, USA 

Tel: +1 206 526 4000 

[email protected] 

Bjarti  Thomsen 

Faroese Fisheries  Laboratory, Noatun 1, P  O Box 3051, Tórshavn,  Faroe Islands 

Tel: +298 353900  Fax: +298 353901 

[email protected] 

Bob van  Marlen 

IMARES,  Haringkade 1,   Ijmuiden, 1976 CP,  Netherlands 

Tel: +31 317487181  Fax: +31 317487326 

[email protected] 

Bundit  Chokesanguan 

SEAFDEC,   Suksawadee Rd.,  Phrasamutchedi, Samut  Prakan, 10290,   Thailand  

Tel: +66 2 4256100  Fax: +66 2 4256110 

[email protected] 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

N AME

| 111

A DDRESS

P HONE /FAX

E MAIL

Christopher  Glass 

University of New  Hampshire,   39 College Road,  Durham NH, 03824,  USA 

Tel: +1 603 862 0122 Fax: +1 603 862  7006 

[email protected] 

Daniel  Valentinsson 

Institute of Marine  Research,   P.O. Box 4,   Lysekil, S‐453 21,  Sweden 

Tel: +4652318747  Fax: +4652313977 

[email protected] 

Dave Reid 

FRS Marine Lab  375 Victoria Road,  AB9 11DB, Aberdeen,  Scotland 

Tel: +44 1224  876544  Tel Direct: +44 1224  295363  Fax: +44 1224  295511 

[email protected] 

Dirk  Verheagele 

ILVO  Ankerstraat 1   8400 Ostende,  Belgium 

Tel: +32496388127 

[email protected] 

Dominic  Rihan 

BIM,   Crofton Road,   Dun Laoghaire, Co.  Dublin,   Ireland 

Tel: +353 12144104  Fax: +353 12300564 

[email protected] 

Fabio Grati 

CNR‐ISMAR,   Largo fiera della pesca,  Ancona, 60125,   Italy 

Tel: +39 071  2078846 

[email protected] 

Francois  Theret 

European Commission,  J 79  02/79, Brussels,  1049, Belgium 

Tel: +32 2 298 03 28  Fax: +32 2 299 48 02 

[email protected] 

Frank Chopin 

FAO Rome 

Tel: +3906 57055257 

[email protected] 

Frodi B.  Shuvadal 

Faroese Fisheries  Laboratory,   Noatun 1,   P O Box 3051,   Tórshavn,   Faroe Islands 

Tel: +298 353900  Fax: +298 353950 

[email protected] 

Gerard  Bavouzet 

IFREMER,   8 rue Francois Toullec,  Lorient,   France 

Tel: +33 2 97 873830 Fax: +33 2 97873838 

[email protected] 

Gianni Fabi 

CNR‐ISMAR,   Largo fiera della pesca,  Ancona, 60125,   Italy 

Tel: +39 071  2078825  Fax: +39 071 55313 

[email protected] 

Håkan  Vesterberg 

Swedish Board of  Fisheries 

Tel: +46317430333  Fax: +46317430444 

[email protected] 

Hans Polet  

ILVO‐FISHERY  Ankerstraat 1   8400 Ostende,  Belgium 

Tel: +3259569837 

[email protected] 

Harldur  Einarsson 

Marine Research  Institute of Iceland,  Skúlagata 4, 101,  Reykjavík,   Iceland 

Tel: +354 5752000  Fax: +354 5752001 

[email protected] 

 

112 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

N AME

 

A DDRESS

P HONE /FAX

E MAIL

Huseyin  Ozbilgin 

Mersin University  Fisheries Faculty,  Yenisehir Campus,  33169, Mersin,   Turkey 

Tel: +90 532  7061977  Fax: +90 324  3413025 

[email protected] 

Irene Huse 

Institute of Marine  Research,   Nordnesgt 33,   N‐5817, Bergen   Norway 

Tel: +47 55236808  Fax: +47 55236830 

[email protected] 

Jacques Sacchi 

IFREMER,  Jean Monnet,   Sete, 34200,   France 

Tel: +33 4 99 57 32  08 

[email protected] 

James C.  Ogbonna 

Fisheries Dept.  Nigeria 

Tel: +234806  5775322 

[email protected] 

Janne  Fogelgren 

FAO, Rome 

Tel: +390657052377 

[email protected] 

Jens Floeter 

VTI‐OSF AG  Fischerieitechnik,  Palmelie 9,  D‐22767 Hamburg,  Germany 

Tel: +44 (0) 40  38905185 

[email protected] 

Jochen  Depestele 

ILVO‐Fisheries,  Ankerstraat 1,  Oostende, B‐8400,  Belgium. 

Tel: +32 59 56 98 38  Fax: +32 59 33 06 29 

[email protected] 

Johan Lovgren 

Institute of Marine  Research,   P.O. Box 4,   S‐453 21 Lysekil,  Sweden 

Tel: +4652318779  Fax: +4652313977 

[email protected] 

Jonathan O.  Dickson 

Bureou of Fisheries and  Aquatic Resources,  PCA Annex Bldg, 4th  Floor Eliptical Road,  Diliman,   1100 Quezon City,  Philippines 

Tel: +6329294296 

[email protected] 

Jose Alio 

Instituto Nacional de  Investigaciones Agricola  Edif. INIA,   Ave. Carupano,  Caiguire,  Cumana,Venezuela 

Tel: +58 293  4317557  Fax: +58 293  4325385 

[email protected] 

Ken Arkley 

Sea Fish Industry  Authority,   Seafish House,   St. Andrews Quay,  Kingston upon Hull,  HU3 4QE, UK 

Tel: +44 1482  327837  Fax: +44 1482  223310 

[email protected] 

Kris Van  Craeynest 

ILVO‐FISHERIES  Ankerstraat 1   8400 Ostende,  Belgium 

Tel: +3259569826 

[email protected] 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

N AME

| 113

A DDRESS

P HONE /FAX

E MAIL

Kristian  Zachariassen 

Faroese Fisheries  Laboratory, Noatun 1,   P O Box 3051,   Tórshavn,   Faroe Islands 

Tel: +298 353900  Fax: +298 353901 

Kriza[email protected] 

Ludvik Krag 

DIFRES,~  North Sea Centre,   Box 101,   Hirtshals, 9850,  Denmark 

Tel: +45 3396 3200   Fax: +45 3396 3260 

[email protected] 

Luis Marcano 

Instituto Nacional de  Investigaciones  Agriculas, Cumana,  Venezuela 

Tel: +58 2934510723 

[email protected] 

Mario Rueda 

Marine and Coastal  Research Institute  (INVEMAR),   Santa Marta Cerro Ponta  Betin,   Colombia 

Tel: +(57) 5–4211380 

[email protected] 

Michael Pol 

Mass. Division of  Marine Fisheries,   1213 Purchase St,   New Bedford, MA,  02740,   USA 

Tel: +11 508  9902860  Fax:+11 508  9900449 

[email protected] 

Mike Breen 

Fisheries Research  Services,   375 Victoria Road,  Aberdeen, AB11 9DB,  Scotland 

Tel: +44 1224  295474  Fax: +44 1224  295511 

[email protected] 

Oumarue  Njifonjou 

IRAD/SRHOL   PMB 77 Limbe,  Cameroon 

Tel: +27377619149 

[email protected] 

Øystein  Patursson 

Aquaculture Research  Station of the Faroes,  Faroe Islands 

Tel: +298 474756  Fax: +298 474748 

[email protected] 

Pascal  Larnaud 

IFREMER,  8 rue F Toullec,   Lorient, 56100,   France 

Tel : +33 297873841  Fax: +33 297873838 

[email protected] 

Paul Winger 

Marine Institute,  155 Ridge Rd.,   St. Johns, A1C5R3,  Canada 

Tel: +1 709 7780430  Fax: +1 709 7780661 

[email protected] 

Peter Munro 

Alaska Fisheries Science  Center (NOAA),   7600 Sand Point Way  NE, Seattle, 98115,   USA 

Tel: +1 206 526 4292 Fax: +1 206 526  6723 

[email protected] 

Philip  MacMullen 

Seafish,   Saint Andrewʹs Dock,  Hull, HU3 4QE,  England 

Tel: +44 1482  327837  Fax: +44 1482  223310 

[email protected] 

Philip Walsh 

Marine Institute,   155 Ridge Rd.,   St. Johns, A1C5R3,  Canada 

Tel: +1 709 7780430  Fax: +1 709 7780661 

[email protected] 

 

114 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

N AME

 

 

A DDRESS

P HONE /FAX

E MAIL

Pingguo He 

University of New  Hampshire,   137 Morse Hall,  Durham, NH, 03824,  USA 

Tel: +1 603 8623154  Fax: +1 603 8620243 

[email protected] 

Rogvi K.  Rouritsen 

FRS, Tórshavn,  Faroe Islands 

Tel: +298353900 

[email protected] 

Sofie  Vandemaele 

ILVO‐FISHERY  Ankerstraat 1   8400 Ostende,  Belgium 

Tel: +3259569883 

sofie.vandemaele @ilvo.vlaanderen.be 

Svein  Løkkeborg 

Institute of Marine  Research,   Nordnesgaten 50, N‐ 5817Bergen,  Norway 

Tel : +47 55236826  Fax : +47 55236830 

[email protected] 

Sven Gunnar  Lunneryl 

Swedish Board of  Fisheries 

Tel: +4631609231  Fax: +46317430444 

sven.gunnar.lunneryl  @fiskeriverket.se 

Tom  Catchpole 

CEFAS,   Pakefield Road,  Lowestoft, NR33 0HT,  UK 

Tel: +44 1502 524  531  Fax: +44 1502 526  531 

[email protected] 

Waldemar  Moderhak 

Sea Fisheries Institute in  Gdynia,  ul.Kollataja 1,   Gdynia, 81–332,   Poland 

Tel: +48 58 7356258  Fax: +48 58 7356110 

[email protected] 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 115

Annex 2: Agenda 21 April   08:30 – 09:00 Registration     09:00 – 09:15 Opening Address    09:15 – 09:30 Housekeeping Issues & Meeting Arrangements (Chair)  09:30 – 10:30 WGFTFB Advice & Requests during 2006/2007 (Chair)  10:30 – 10:50 Coffee Break  10:50 – 11:30 ICES Draft Science Plan & New Advisory Structure (B Karp)   11:30 – 12:00 Report from WGQAF (P.MacMullen)  12:00 – 12:15 Update on Gear Classification Topic (Chair/F.Chopin)  12:15 – 12:30 WWF Smart Gear Competition (A. Revill)  1300 – 14:00 Lunch Break  14:10 – 14:15 ToR a) Species Separation in demersal trawls (P He & M Pol)   14:15–  14:30  Summary  of  Haddock  Symposium  2007  as  it  relates  to  species  separation (M. Pol)  14:30–  14:45  Can  Yellowtail  Flounder  be  harvested  without  bycatch  of  cod  and  haddock  on  Georges  Bank?  Real‐time  spatio‐temporal  fishing strategies (C. Glass).  14:45– 15:00 UK trials with the eliminator trawl and a new simple method for  catch comparison analysis (A. Revill)  15:15 – 15:30 Questions & Discussions   15:30 – 16:00 Coffee Break   16:00 – 16:10 ToR b) on Advise to Assessment WG’s (D Reid)  16:10 – 16:20 ToR c) on Static Gear Selectivity Manual (A Revill)  16:20  –16:30  Size  selectivity  of  basket  traps  for  the  gastropod  Nassarius  mutabilis in the Adriatic Sea (G. Fabi)  16:30  –16:55  ToR  d)  on  Mitigation  Measures  for  portected  species  (A  Lucchetti)  16:55– 17:10 Turtle Excluder Device Experiments In The Central Adriatic Sea  (A. Lucchetti)  17:10 – 17:25 ToR d) Presentation 2 (TBA)  17:25 – 17:40 ToR f )Shrimp Trawl Efficiency (Chair)   17:40 – 18:00 ToR g) WGECO OSPAR QSR report (J Despestele)    22 April   09:00 – 09:10 Housekeeping (Chair)  09:10 – 10:30 FAO Shrimp Project Update (F Chopin)  10:30 – 10:45 Coffee Break  10:45 – 10:50 Introduction to Open Session (Chair)  10:50 – 11:05 Nordic Pelagic Project (F. Skúvadal)  11:05 – 11:25 Direct observations of large mesh capelin trawls; evaluation of  mesh escapement and gear efficiency (H. Einarsson)  11:25– 11:45 Design and test of a topless shrimp trawl to reduce pelagic fish  bycatch in the Gulf of Maine pink shrimp fishery (P. He)  11:45– 12:00 FISHSELECT ‐ a tool for predicting basic selective properties for  nettings (B. Hermann)  12:00–  12:20  Technical  and  selective  properties  of  T90  meshes  codend‐ extension made of different netting stiffness (W. Moderhak)  12:20–  12:40  Fuel  Saving  Initiatives  in  the  French  Fishing  Industry  (B.  Vincent)   12:40–  13:00  Modeling  flow  through  and  around  nets  using  computational  fluid dynamics (Øystein Patursson)   

116 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

12:40 – 13:30 Lunch Break   13:30 – 15:30 Topic Group meetings   15:30 – 15:50 Coffee Break  15:50 – 17:30 Topic Group Meetings     23 April   09:00 – 17:00 Topic Group Meetings     24 April   09:00 – 09.10 Housekeeping (Chair)   09:10 – 10:20 Topic Group Meetings   10:20– 10:50 Coffee   10:50 – 13:00 Topic Group Meetings   13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break  14:00  –  14:30  Presentation  of  report,  conclusions  &  recommendations  on  Species Separation  14:30  –  15:20  Presentation  of  report,  conclusions  &  recommendations  on  Fisheries Advice  15:20 – 15:50 Coffee Break   15:50 – 16:30 Presentation of report, conclusions & recommendations on  Static Gear  16:30  –  17:30  Presentation  of  report,  conclusions  &  recommendations  on  Mitigation Methods    25 April   09:00 – 09:15 Housekeeping (Chair)  09:15 – 09:35 Report on SGPOT (B. Thomson & M.Pol)  09:35  –  10:20  Presentation  of  report,  conclusions  &  recommendations  on  Shrimp Trawls   10:20  –  11:00  Presentation  of  report,  conclusions  &  recommendations  on  WGECO request  11:00 – 11:15 Coffee Break  11:15 – 12:00 Report from WGQAF (P MacMullen)  12:00 – 12:30 TORs for 2009 (Chair)  12:30 – 12:40 Suggestions for ASC theme session topics 2009 (Chair)   12:40 – 12:50 Date and venue for WGFTFB 2009 meeting (Chair)  12:50 – 13:00 AOB and concluding remarks (Chair)  13:00 – 14:00 Lunch& Close Meeting 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 117

Annex 3: Recommendations The  following  table  summarises  the  main  recommendations  arising  from  the  WGFTFB and identifies suggested responsibilities for action. R ECOMMENDATION

F OR

FOLLOW UP BY :

1. WGFTFB recommends the publication of an ICES Cooperative  Research Report on Species Separartion based on the work  carried out by the Topic Group. 

FTC, ICES Publications  Committee 

2. The topic group will continue to collate this information on an  annual basis, based on the issues related above and subject to  further revision of the questionnaire and better quantification of  the information where possible.  

ACOM, AMAWGC, GFCM  Assessment Chairs to note. 

3. WGFTFB should continue to receive feedback from the  different Expert Group’s and AWAWGC, to assess the usefulness  of the information supplied and also target specific areas that are  identified of particular importance to individual assessment  WG’s. WGFTFB are committed to assisting in the provision of  information to the new Benchmark workshops planned for  winter 2008/2009. 

ACOM, AMAWGC, GFCM  Assessment Chairs to note. 

4. WGFTFB will expand the provision of information to other  relevant groups such as GFCM in the Mediterranean.  

ACOM, AMAWGC, GFCM  Assessment Chairs to note. 

5. WGFTFB recommend that the Topic Group work to the  timetable outlined to drafte the gillnet selectivity manual. This  will be presented to WGFTFB at the 2009 meeting. 

FTC, FAO, ICES Publication  committee to note 

6. WGFTFB recommend that the Compendium of Mitigation  Methods deployed to minimise bycatch of protected species  developed by SGBYC and expanded on by WGFTFB should  continued to be updated as information on work being  undertaken globally becomes available. 

FTC, FAO‐GFCM, SGBYC,  WGMME, WGECO to note 

7. WGFTFB recommend that GFCM encourage Mediterranean  States instigate data collection programmes to provide a better  understanding of the bycatch issues in Mediterranean fisheries,  particularly in non‐EU countries. 

FTC, FAO‐GFCM, SGBYC,  WGMME, WGECO to note 

8. WGFTFB recommend that research in the Mediterranean on  mitigation technologies be carried out under commercial  conditions and include consideration of socio‐economic effects of  introducing such technologies. 

FTC, FAO‐GFCM, SGBYC,  WGMME, WGECO to note 

9. WGFTFB recommend as a matter of priority that GFCM  instigate further development and testing of Turtle Excluder  Devices in trawl fisheries in the Central Adriatic, Tunisia and the  North‐east Mediterranean given the level of turtle bycatch in  these areas. 

FTC, FAO‐GFCM, SGBYC,  WGECO to note 

10. WGFTFB recommend that GFCM instigate research and pilot  projects to ascertain whether simple modifications to longline  gears such as the use of circle hooks, different bait types and  setting depths used extensively in other parts of the world e.g.  US and Hawaii to reduce turtle bycatch are appropriate in the  Mediterranean. 

FTC, FAO‐GFCM, SGBYC,  WGECO to note 

11. WGFTFB recommends the issue of shrimp trawl efficiency be  addressed to SGGEM as a case study for consideration  

SGGEM, NIPAG, STACREC,  FTC, ACOM 

12. WGFTFB recommends further analysis of the Icelandic or  other suitable datasets by SGGEM. 

SGGEM, NIPAG, STACREC,  FTC, ACOM 

 

118 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

R ECOMMENDATION

F OR

FOLLOW UP BY :

13. WGFTFB recommends that SGGEM should consider whether  horizontal wingend spread can be used as an effort parameter for  this fishery. 

SGGEM, NIPAG, STACREC,  FTC, ACOM 

WGFTFB recommends that WGECO use the findings of the case  studies presented in the context of the OSPAR QSR 2010.  

FTC, WGECO, ACOM 

WGFTFB recommends that the case studies presented by  WGFTFB be used to assist in the development of a framework  that can be used to assess the efficacy of gear‐based technical  measures introduced to reduce the environmental impact of  fishing. 

FTC, WGECO, ACOM 

WGFTFB recommend that definitions and terms associated with  catch, bycatch and discards be collated and assessed and the  drafting of a new definition(s) of terms used to describe the  various catch components be considered. 

FTC, WGQAF, WGECO, ACOM 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 119

Annex 4: WGFTFB terms of reference for the next meeting The  ICES‐FAO  Working  Group  on  Fishing  Technology  and  Fish  Behaviour  [WGFTFB]  (Chair:  Dominic  Rihan,  Ireland)  will  meet  in  Ancona,  Italy  from  18  –  22  May 2009 to address the following ToRs:  a ) Incorporation  of  Fishing  Technology  Issues/Expertise  into  Manage‐ ment  Advice.  Based  on  the  questionnaire  exercise  carried  out  in  2005/2006, 2006/2007 and 2007/2008.  Conveners: Dave Reid (FRS, Scotland); Norman Graham (Marine Institute, Ireland);  and Dominic Rihan( BIM, Ireland)   b ) A  WGFTFB  topic  group  of  experts  will  be  formed  with  the  following  ToRs:  i ) Identify all seine net fisheries globally and describe the gears being  used in terms of net design, rope material and construction, as well as  areas being worked.  ii ) Critically assess these fisheries, identifying the positive aspects in  terms of reduced fuel consumption, high fish quality and low bottom  impact as well as the negative aspects with respect to gear selectivity  and technological creep.  iii ) Evaluate methods for determining selectivity in these gears to allow  comparison with conventional towed gears e.g. otter trawls   iv ) Make recommendation for research/monitoring work to substantiate  (or otherwise) claims for environmental friendliness, discarding, un‐ accounted fishing mortality.  Conveners:  Ken  Arkley  (SFIA,  UK);  Rob  Kynoch  (FRS,  Scotland);  and  Harldur  Einarsson (MRI, Iceland)  c ) A  WGFTFB  topic  group  of  experts  will  be  formed  with  the  following  ToRs:  •

To  review  and  appraise  the  current  selectivity  characteristics  of  the  gears  used  in  the  Area  VII  Nephrops  trawl  fisheries  and  Beam  trawl  fisheries for flatfish in ICES areas IV and VIId; and 

i ) To propose potential gear modifications that could contribute to the  future technical conservation measures needed to achieve the targets  proposed by the European Commission, while also taking into ac‐ count fish survival from such gear modifications.  Conveners: Dominic Rihan (BIM, Ireland); Andy Revill (CEFAS, UK) and Hans  Polet (ILVO, Belgium)   d ) A WGFTFB topic group will be formed with the following ToRs:  •

Review  progress  with  better  developing  scientific  collaboration  of  WGFTFB  with  GFCM  on  fishing  technology  issues  in  the  Mediterra‐ nean; and specifically 



Review new research with 40mm square‐mesh codends introduced re‐ cently into EU legislation for the Mediterranean; 



Assess  the  efficacy  of  this  measure  in  terms  of  improved  selectivity  and fish survival; 



Identify whether from a technical perspective that the regulation needs  to be amended i.e. twine material, meshes in the circumference.   

120 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Conveners: Jacques Sacchi (IFREMER, France); Antonello Sala (CNR‐ISMAR, Italy)  and Huseyin Ozbilgin (Mersin University, Turkey)   WGFTFB  will  report  by  16  June  2009  to  the  attention  of  the  Fisheries  Technology  Committee.  Supporting Information

 

 

 

Priority: 

The current activities of this Group will lead ICES into issues related to the  effectiveness of technical measures to change size selectivity and fishing  mortality rates. Consequently these activities are considered to have a very high  priority 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Scientific  justification and  relation to action  plan: 

| 121

Action Item 3.16, 3.17, 3.18, 5.8, 5.11, 5.16, 6.3 (a)  Action Item 3.2, 3.13, 4.11.3, 4.13, 5.11 (b)  Action Item 3.16, 3.18, 4.13, 5.8, 5.12 (c)   Action Item 3.2, 3.5, 3.16,3.17,4.13, 5.8 (d)  Term of Reference a)  Fisheries management bodies are often dependant on catch per unit effort for  stock assessment purposes and fishery/fleet based advice. Identification and use  of gear parameters that effect fishing efficiency will most likely improve the use  of commercial catches for stock assessment purposes. The topic group has the  expertise to identify such parameters and will work intersessionally, reviewing  existing initiatives e.g. EC data collection regulation and provide a list for con‐ sideration during the 2008 WGFTFB meeting. The information collated by the  WGFTFB has been well received by ICES assessment and other Expert Groups.  It is intended to continue with the collation of this information but further de‐ velopments are needed. The topic group recommends a number of changes to  improve the utility and simplicity of this work. The next questionnaire will be  based on the emergent issues identified in this report, and focused on 2008/2009.  Feedback on the content and value of this years report will be sought from the  Assessment working groups and through AMAWGC and will be used to im‐ prove the survey in 2009. If possible, the EC should be asked to provide up to  date information on recent TCM regulations. These will be included in the sur‐ vey with a request to detail likely outcomes from these measures.  Term of Reference b)  Seining, either fly‐dragging or anchor seining are considered to be  “environmentally friendly” fishing methods with a number of positive benefits.  Traditionally the gear used tends to be of much lighter construction and as there  are no trawl doors or warps has less impact on the seabed than trawling. The  use of such light gear also means the method is very fuel efficient. Another  positive aspect of the method is that fish are only caught in the very last part of  the capture process, and therefore are not in the codend of the net very long  leading to high catch quality of fish compared to trawled fish.   In the early 1990s, in countries such as Scotland and Ireland the number of ves‐ sels seining declined as vessels switched to twin‐rig trawling, targeting species  such as monkfish and nephrops, taking advantage of relatively low fuel prices. In  recent  years,  however,  as  fuel  prices  have  steadily  increased  attention  once  again has shifted to this method and there has been a switch back to this method  in some countries e.g. Scotland and Ireland and interest in developing the tech‐ nique in other EU countries, notably France and Netherlands and further a field  in countries such as the Philippines and South Africa.   While there is no doubting the positive benefits of seining as indicated, concerns  have been expressed that there are negative aspects associated with the method  that should be addressed, given the increased interest and adoption by  fishermen globally. For instance in Scotland and Ireland there is evidence of  high discarding and high‐grading as seine netters aim to maximise returns. Also  as the pressure on grounds increase and seiners are forced into areas of harder  ground, there is evidence of technological creep in seine net design with much  heavier seine ropes and heavy hopper footropes now commonly used. There are  similarly concerns in some quarters in the adoption of seine net techniques by  French and Dutch vessels given these vessels are often targeting non‐quota  species such as red mullet for which there is little or no scientific assessment.  

 

122 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Scientific  justification and  relation to action  plan: 

Term of Reference c)  In 2008 the European Commission will focus on mitigation of discards  associated with a number of key fisheries in community waters. Part of this  process is to identify candidate technical measures suitable for these fisheries  which will achieve measurable targeted reductions. The target discard levels are  to be fishery specific and will be reduced over a specified period so as to achieve  a Maximum Allowed Bycatch Limit (MABL). In the recent non‐paper “On the  implementation of the policy to reduce unwanted bycatch and eliminate  discards in European fisheries” the commission has identified two key fisheries,  these are:  Bottom trawl fisheries in ICES area VII targeting Nephrops and;  Beam trawling for flatfish in ICES areas IV and VIId  Proposed MABL targets for fishery (i) are to be based on a baseline estimate of  50% (by weight) and 60% (by number) and are reduced over a period of five  years to be no more than 10% (by weight) and 15% (by number) of the total  catch (MABL). During year 1 and 2, the rates are to be reduced by 50% year on  year, while overall reductions of 60, 70 and 80% compared to the baseline level  will be expected in years 3, 4 and 5.  For fishery (ii) the baseline level is assumed to be70 and 80% by weight and  number respectively. The final target after 6 years is set at no more than 15 and  20% with reductions during the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th years of at least, 50%, 60%,  70% and 80% of the original baseline levels.  Clearly these represent significant reductions and stiff targets in overall discard  fisheries. However, in order to achieve these, modifications to the current range  of technical conservations measures are required.  Term of Reference d)  At the 2007 WGFTFB meeting a recommendation was made for better  collaboration between WGFTFB and GFCM on gear technology issues. It would  be opportune to determine if progress has been made on this objective in 2009.  In this context it woul also seem an opportune time to consider the new 40mm  square mesh codend regulations introduced into the Mediterranean.   Mediterranean demersal trawl fisheries traditionally operate using small  diamond‐shape meshes in the codend, which tend to retain almost all animals.  Furthermore, the use of such small mesh sizes leads to a bycatch which is of low  commercial value and often almost entirely discarded. In order to reduce  mortality rates for juveniles and discards of dying marine organisms by fishing  vessels, Council Regulation (EC) No. 1967/2006, concerning management  measures for the sustainable exploitation of fishery resources in the  Mediterranean, establishes that it is appropriate to provide for increases in mesh  sizes for trawl nets used for fishing for certain species of marine organisms and  for the mandatory use of square‐meshed netting.   Furthermore, the (EC) 1967/2006 establishes in Annex II point 7 that technical  specifications limiting the maximum dimensions of some parts of the trawl nets  along with the maximum number of nets in multi‐rig trawl nets. Establishing  the maximum dimension and number of fishing gears per vessels represent a  way to control and limit the fishing effort. The effect and efficiacy of these  measures should be assessed. 

 

Resource  requirements: 

The research programmes, which provide the main input to this group, are  already underway, and resources are already committed. The additional  resource required to undertake additional activities in the framework of this  group is negligible. 

Participants: 

The Group is normally attended by some 50–70 scientists and invited experts. 

Secretariat  facilities: 

None. 

Financial: 

None required. Having overlaps with other meetings of expert groups of FTC  increases efficiency and reduces travel costs. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 123

Linkages to  advisory  committees: 

The questions of bycatch reduction, fisheries information and survey  standardization are of direct interest to ACOM. 

Linkages to other  committees or  groups: 

This work is of direct relevance to the Working Group on Ecosystem Effects of  Fisheries, WG on Fishery Systems, WG on International Bottom Trawl Surveys,  Baltic Committee, Marine Habitat Committee, Resource Management Commit‐ tee and Living Resources Committee and the Assessment Working Groups.

Linkages to other  organizations: 

The work of this group is closely aligned with similar work in FAO and also the  EU Regional Advisory Councils. 

 

124 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 5: Study Groups It is recommended that a Study Group on Turned 90˚ Codend Selectivity, focusing  on Baltic Cod Selectivity [SGTCOD] Chairs: Bent Hermann, DIFRES, Denmark and  Waldemar Moderhak MIR, Poland) be established and meet in ‐‐‐ to address the fol‐ lowing ToRs:  a ) To  evaluate  the  effect  of  turning  diamond  netting  by  90°  (T90)  on  codend selectivity.  b ) To improve knowledge on the size selection processes in T90 codends  compared to T0 codends (normal direction of diamond netting).   c ) To attempt to quantify the magnitudes of the effects of different factors  (construction,  generic  netting  properties,  stock  specific  morphology,  catch composition)  d ) To  develop  a  guide  on  T90  codend  constructions  with  respect  to  size  selection properties and optimal construction; and  e ) To review available data on fish survival and in particular cod escap‐ ing from T90 codends.   SGTCOD will report by xxxx for the attention of the Fisheries Technology Commit‐ tee.  Supporting Information  

 

Priority: 

The current activities of this Group will lead ICES into issues related to the ef‐ fectiveness of technical measures to change size selectivity and fishing mortality  rates. Consequently these activities are considered to have a very high priority 

Scientific  justification and  relation to action  plan: 

Action Item 3.16, 3.17, 3.18, 5.8, 5.11, 5.16, 6.3     The use of T90 codends is legal in the Baltic Sea cod fishery and there is an in‐ creasing global interest in using T90 for towed fishing gears. The basic mecha‐ nisms governing T90 performance are, however, not well understood or  quantified.    In order to address this it is proposed to set up a Study Group specifically to  look at all issues relating to the use of T90 netting as a means of improving se‐ lectivity. The objectives will be reached by combining field experiments (size  selectivity experiments), laboratory experiments with nettings (loading by dif‐ ferent forces comparing mesh openness), laboratory experiments with fish mor‐ phology specific on Baltic cod (FISHSELECT) and theoretical approach  (structural mechanic for bending of mesh bars under load and computer simula‐ tions). A case study on Baltic cod will be conducted.    We expect that the benefit of T90 on size selectivity will depend on the netting  panel construction (twine thickness, twine stiffness, single/double twine, ratio  between mesh sizes (mesh bar)/twine thickness). Therefore all T90 experiments  should be evaluated against a baseline of experiments with similar diamond  mesh codends (T0) made of the same netting and having the same number of  meshes around. For the comparison of results from sea trials regarding the per‐ formance of T90 it is important that the trawl designs in front of the codends (T0  and T90) are identical. It is also important that the experimental design take into  account potential confounding effects like vessel size. The level of unaccounted  mortality of cod escaping through T90 codends will also be considered specifi‐ cally for the Baltic.    

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 125

Resource  requirements: 

The research programmes, which provide the main input to this group, are al‐ ready underway, and resources are already committed. The additional resource  required to undertake additional activities in the framework of this group is  negligible. 

Participants: 

The Study Group is likely to attract 10–15 participants from Baltic countries and  a further 5 experts in the field. 

Secretariat  facilities: 

None. 

Financial: 

No financial implications. 

Linkages to  advisory  committees: 

ACOM 

Linkages to other  committees or  groups: 

There is a very close working relationship with all the groups of the Fisheries  Technology Committee. It is also very relevant to the Working Group on  Ecosystem Effects of Fisheries and Baltic Fisheries Committee 

Linkages to other  organizations: 

The work of this group is closely aligned with the EU and Baltic Sea Regional  Advisory Council. 

 

126 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 6: Proposed Term of Reference JFTAB It  is  proposed  a  Joint  Workshop  of  the  ICES‐FAO  Working  Group  on  Fishing  Technology  and  Fish  Behaviour  [WGFTFB]  and  the  Working  Group  on  Fisheries  Acoustics  Science  and  Technology  [WGFAST]  will  be  held  in  Ancona,  Italy  on  20  May 2009 ‐ Co‐Chairs: Paul Winger (Marine Institute, Canada), Emma Jones (NIWA,  New Zealand) and Julia Parish (University of Washington, USA) to address the fol‐ lowing ToRs:  a ) To explore the decisions (i.e. bahvioural trade‐off’s) made by fish and  crustaceans  during  natural  behaviour,  vessel  avoidance,  and  in  re‐ sponse to fishing gear and other platforms.  Supporting Information  

 

Priority: 

The current activities of this Group will lead ICES into issues related to the ef‐ fectiveness of technical measures to change size selectivity and fishing mortality  rates. Consequently these activities are considered to have a very high priority 

Scientific  justification and  relation to action  plan: 

Action Item 3.16, 3.17, 3.18, 5.8, 5.11, 5.16, 6.3     The second ICES Symposium on fish behaviour, entitled “Fish Behaviour in  Exploited Ecosystems” was recently held in Bergen, June 2003. Scientific research  was presented across 5 key theme sessions, culminating in 27 peer‐reviewed  papers (Fernö et al. 2004) with Discussion Sessions recorded by Bjordal and  Gerlotto (2004), Huse (2004), Glass and Gunn (2004), Walsh et al. (2004), and  Thiele and Fernö (2004).  One of the dominant conclusions from several of the theme sessions was the  need to challenge our traditional approaches to the study of fish behaviour. No  one would argue that the field hasn’t grown rapidly, nor that our observational  techniques haven’t improved remarkably. They have. But what is clear, is that  there continues to be too much observation and description of animal behaviour  without an attempt to understand why fish do what they do (Bjordal and Gerlotto  2004; Glass and Gunn 2004; Walsh et al., 2004).  This joint session presents a forum for discussion on new approaches and  interpretation of animal behaviour. We invite presentations and posters that  emphasize the functional explanations behind behavioural expression, whether  it be natural behaviour, vessel‐induced behaviour, or animal behaviour in  relation to fishing gear. We want to explore the costs and benefits associated  with the decisions that animals make and how we can predict the probable (or  optimal) decision under different conditions? For example, what are the  behavioural trade‐offs that fish make in response to an attractive odour plume  when simultaneously engaged in spawning, or by contrast, what is the optimal  avoidance distance to an approaching trawler when actively engaged in  feeding?   

 

Resource  requirements: 

The research programmes, which provide the main input to this group, are al‐ ready underway, and resources are already committed. The additional resource  required to undertake additional activities in the framework of this group is  negligible. 

Participants: 

The Joint Session is likely to attract 50–100 participants from WGFTFB,  WGFAST and invited experts.  

Secretariat  facilities: 

None. 

Financial: 

No financial implications. 

Linkages to  advisory  committees: 

ACOM 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 127

Linkages to other  committees or  groups: 

There is a very close working relationship with all the groups of the Fisheries  Technology Committee and the joint sessionw ill continue to consolidate these  links. 

Linkages to other  organizations: 

None 

 

128 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 7: Outline of CRR Report on Species Separation 1. Introduction 2. Review of recent literature on fish behaviour and species separation (Pingguo He) This  section  will  review  relevant  information  on  fish  behaviour  and  species  separa‐ tion  methods  which  may  be  potentially  useful  for  application  in  separation  of  groundfish species. Actual application and design of species separation devices and  strategies will be elaborated in Section 3.   Spatial and temporal differences in behaviour and distribution  Swimming ability  Fish reaction to gear components  Recent research on species separation in demersal trawls  3. Fish behaviour and strategies for avoiding and separating species in demersal trawls 3.1 Fish behaviour and species separation species using spatial and temporal separation (Dave Reid/Chris Glass)  



Principles 



Strategies 



Effectiveness 



Avoid encounter with unwanted species 



Employ  spatial  and  temporal  distribution  characteristics  to  fish  for  target  species and to avoid bycatch species 



Use  real  time  voluntary  or  non‐voluntary  bycatch  reporting  network  to  avoid area of bycatch concentration 



Use remote identification of species using acoustics, video or other sensors 



Conduct test tows 



Use specialized or alternate gear 



Vessel noise characteristics  

3.2 Fish behaviour and species separation between the doors, bridles and the mouth of the trawl (Emma Jones and Paul Winger)

 



Principles 



Strategies 



Effectiveness 



Trawl Doors – Colour and sand cloud, bottom contact – sand cloud 



Trawl door design 



Quasi / Semi‐pelagic fishing 



Non‐herding trawls 



Altering sweep lengths and angles 



Modifying Wings of the net 



Counter‐herding devices 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 129

Others to consider may include:  •

Guide undesired species out of the trawl path 



Alter warp‐depth ratios 



Reduce herding efficiency for unwanted species through  



Reduce towing speed 



Electrical stimulus 



Alter sand cloud with semi‐pelagic doors 



Alter noise of doors, floats, etc. 



Alter visual stimuli of components of trawl mouth 



Modify contact of sweeps and bridles with spacers 



Avoid  herding  by  increasing  swept  area  using  multiple  rigs  instead  of  sweeps with single rig. 



Use of tickler chains 

3.3 Fish behaviour and Species separation at the mouth of the trawl (Mike Pol /Ludvig Krag /Bob van Marlen)



Principles 



Strategies 



Modifications to the top of the trawl net 



Modifications to the net overhang  



Modifications to top panels (large mesh top panels) 



Cut back headline (topless) trawls 



Modify headline height   



Modifications to the headline of the trawl 



Modifications to the net mouth  



Modifications to the bottom of the net 



Modify height of fishing line  



Modify type or construction of ground gear 



Increase spaces between discs or bobbins  



Drop‐out panels 



Other modifications 



Alternative stimulation 

3.4 Fish behaviour and species separation in the extension and codend (Haraldur Einarsson/Ken Arkley)



Principles of separations within the codend and how it compares with the  rest of the gear. 



Biological factors influencing species separations. 



Separations process is possibly throughout all capture process.  



Clarifications of extension (influence of separations).  



Uncounted mortality.  



Behaviour of stressed fish. 

Rigid Devices & Sorting Devices  •

Grids, Sort‐X (Norway), Sort‐V (Norway – Iceland)   

130 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



TEDs, J‐TEDs (FAO), Eurogrid, Flatfish grid (Faeroese Flexigrid) 



Yellow flounder grid  



Flexible arrangements 



Latitudinal ropes  



Horizontal panels 



Use of horizontal and inclined separator panels or ropes  



Inclined panels, Ireland’s grid panel. 



Escape windows  



Provide exit openings/funnels  



Use square mesh windows  



Provide escape openings (e.g. Fish eye, radial escape panel)  



Use square mesh windows (e.g. BACOMA window)  



Different mesh in side panels in four‐panel net  



Longitudinal ropes  



Visual stimuli: dark tunnels 



Codend design 



Drop out panel location and colours in bottom of trawl (Milliken)  



Alternative mesh configurations (e.g. hexagonal meshes)  



Alternative mesh colours and characteristics  



Alter taper of net construction  



Alternative meshes including T‐90 and hexagonal meshes  



Alternative  mesh  configurations  such  as  composite  codends  (square  and  diamond, etc)  



Surface characteristics and construction of mesh materials  



Additional consideration for improvement 



Remote observation and release of catch  



Manipulation of water flow  

4. Conclusions, future work and recommendations •

Conclusions 



Knowledge gaps 



Recommendations 

5. References

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 131

Annex 8: WGFTFB Information for other ICES Expert Groups – Questionnaire sent to WGFTFB members Incorporation of Fishing Technology Issues/Expertise into Management Advice Rationale: Over the past few years, the nature of the advice ICES has been requested to provide  by the client commissions e.g. Norway, EU, and NAFO etc has changed considerably.   ICES is now asked to provide advice that is more holistic in nature, including infor‐ mation on the influence and effects of human activities on the marine ecosystem.   From the fishing technology perspective this includes information on how fishermen  are responding and adapting to changes in regulatory frameworks e.g. the introduc‐ tion  of  effort  control;  technological  creep;  fleet  adaptations  to  other  issues  e.g.  fuel  prices etc.   In  response  to  this  WGFTFB  initiated  a  ToR  in  2005  to  collect  data  and  information  that  was  appropriate  for  fisheries  and  ecosystem  based  advice,  co‐sponsored  by  Dominic Rihan (Ireland), Dave Reid (Scotland) and Norman Graham (Ireland).  In 2006, the FAO‐ICES WGFTFB was formally requested by the Advisory Committee  on Fisheries Management (ACFM) to provide such information and to submit this to  the appropriate assessment working group.   This type of information is becoming more and more important at both international  and national levels. It demonstrates that the community of gear technologists have an  important role to play in this and that our expertise is considered to be highly valued.  Please  note  that  this  is  intended  for  WGFTFB  members  from  countries  that  receive  their stock/fisheries advice from ICES.   It would be greatly appreciated if you, in collaboration with whoever necessary, fill  out the questionnaire.  Thank you for your time and effort  Norman, Dave and Dominic  Introduction This contains a series of questions relating to recent changes within the fleets in you  particular country that you may have observed. It also gives you the opportunity to  raise any issues that you think are important but are not currently recognised.   If at all possible, please try to quantify your statements or state how the information  has  been  derived  e.g.  common  knowledge,  personal  observations,  discussions  with  industry etc.   a.

Changes in Fleet Dynamics between 2006 and 2008 

Have there been any major shifts between mesh categories (e.g. from 100mm+ to  70 – 90mm) and in which ICES area has this occurred?  What are the principal driving factors for this change? (e.g. effort allocation, and  fuel costs).  

 

132 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Is there a geographical shift in activity (e.g. between IV to VI – give the subdivi‐ sion if possible)?  Within a particular mesh/gear category, has there been any shift in target species  (e.g. from demersal gadoids to anglerfish; sardine to tuna etc)  Has  there  been  any  removal  of  effort  through  decommissioning  schemes,  of  so  which  fleets  have  been  affected  and  has  the  decommissioning  affected  older  or  newer vessels or a combination of both?  What proportion of the fleet has opted for decommissioning (express as a percent‐ age of the total fleet)?   b.

Technology Creep 

Include such issues as new gear handling methods/equipment; switch from single  to multiple trawling for example; changes in vessel design that could affect effort  etc; new fish finding equipment.  Have  there  been  any  significant  changes  in  gear  usage  in  specific  fisheries,  if  so  what are the changes (e.g. switch from twin to single rig trawling, beam trawl to  seine net).  In which fishery has this occurred and in what ICES areas?  Have  any  other  technical  changes  occurred  in  particular  fleets  that  will  have  re‐ sulted in changes in catching efficiency (e.g. changes in fishing pattern, new gears  or navigational equipment) has the change in catchability been quantified?   c.

Technical Conservation Measures  

Other  important  information  could  include  what  is  the  level  of  uptake  if  volun‐ tary,  has  the  selectivity  of these  been  determined  and  if  so  how  does  it  compare  with  the  earlier  estimates,  are  there  any  other  wider  benefits  e.g.  reduced  fuel  costs, ecosystem benefits etc.  Have  any  new  TCM’s  been  introduced  into  specific  fisheries?  If  so  what  are  the  measures and which fleets and/or areas are affected?  Have any incentives been introduced to promote the use of more selective gears?  If so which fleets/areas are targeted and what are the incentives (e.g. additional ef‐ fort allocations for use of Swedish grids/SMPs)   Can the changes in selectivity (size or species) be quantified relative to ‘standard’  gears; if so what are the changes (e.g. shift in L50, % reduction in bycatch)  What proportion of the fleet has opted to use new TCMs (0 ‐5; 5 highest)   Please specify regulation (national or otherwise) and fishery.   d.

Ecosystem Effects 

Are  there  any  fisheries  where  there are  known impacts  on  non‐target species in‐ cluding birds and marine mammals, ghost fishing etc?   Are there any mitigation measures in place and how effective have they been?   e.

Development of New Fisheries 

Briefly describe any new fisheries developed?   Have these new fisheries removed effort from others, and if so can you provide  an estimate (in terms of numbers of vessels) of how many?   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 133

Please  return  both  files  prior  to  the  WGFTFB  meeting  by  email  to  Norman  Graham  ([email protected])  and  use  a  country  code  identifier  in  the  file  name  e.g.  Norway.doc.  Your  information  will  then  be  collated  during  the  WGFTFB  meeting  into a common format. 

A N N EX 8 a : F T F B R e p o r t t o W G S S D S & W G H M M This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system  effects;  and  the  development  of  new  fisheries  in  the  Southern  Shelf  Assessment Area including the Celtic Sea and hake, monkfish and megrim stocks.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in Southern Shelf fisheries; information was obtained from Ireland,  Belgium, Spain (Basque Country) and France.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics between 2007 and 2008 •

Effort  associated  with  French  purse  seine  vessels  targeting  anchovy  and  bluefin  tuna  has  transferred  to  targeting  red  mullet,  squid  and  whiting  with Danish Seines in the Bay of Biscay. A similar trend has been observed  in Ireland, with a switch from demersal trawling for monkfish and megrim  to Danish Seining for roundfish. It is estimated that this has increased the  Irish Seine net activity from 5 to 10 vessels in the space of one year (France:  Implications: shift in target species and gear type).  



French  vessels  targeting  Nephrops  are  now  reverting  back  to  the  use  of  a  single trawl rig to reduce fuel consumption (France: Implications: Reduced  LPUE;  changes  in  bycatch  species  and  length  composition  [Breen  et  al,  1996]).  



Effort in the pelagic pair trawl fisheries for sea bass, tuna and anchovy has  reduced and transferred to megrim and monkfish using demersal trawl in  VIIIa and VIIIb (France and Spain: Implications: Changes in effort and gear  type). 



Economic  losses  associated  with  French  quota  reductions  of  traditional  species such as cod, whiting and plaice in VIId and IVc have been partially  compensated  for  by  increased  catches  of  red  mullet,  sea  bass  and  squid  (France:  Implications:  Increased  landings  of  non‐quota  and  non‐assessed  species).  



French trawlers targeting whiting which traditionally operate in VIId have  switched effort into IVb due to reduced catch rates in VIId and to reduce  fuel consumption by decreasing the number of individual trips but increas‐ ing  duration.  (France:  Implications:  Switch  in  effort  between  assessment  areas possible issues for raising metrics). 



During 2007/2008 5% of the Belgian beam trawl fleet was removed through  decommissioning.  



During 2008 Ireland introduced a further decommissioning scheme which  aims to remove 11,140GT from the fleet register. This is targeted at vessels  over  10  years  and  >18m.  To  date  applications  represent  ~45%  of  the  total  target,  which  is  expected  to  be  over  subscribed.  The  majority  of  applica‐  

134 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

tions  emanate  from  East  and  west  coast  ports  from  vessels  which  tradi‐ tionally target Nephrops with uptake from the South East also. No applica‐ tions  have  so  far  been  received  from  vessels  from  the  South  West  which  traditionally target  whitefish.  It  is  expected  that  much  of  the  actual  effort  removed  from  the  decommissioning  scheme  may  be  partially  negated  through  the  introduction  of  ~21  modern  second  hand  vessels  (mostly  ex‐ French)  into  the  fleet.  These  have  either  replaced  existing  older,  less  effi‐ cient vessels, or have taken advantage of ‘semi‐dormant’ tonnage of which  a further ~3000GT remains. (Belgium and Ireland: Reductions in Fleets).  

 



A portion of the Basque demersal trawl fleet now targets mackerel during  the  winter  months  in  ICES  areas  VIIIabd  (Spain:  Implications:  partial  switch in effort). 



Approximately 25% of the Basque VHVO demersal fleet opted for decom‐ missioning  during  2007/2008.  This  has  affected  older  vessels.  In  addition  10–20% of the remaining side trawlers have been replaced by modern stern  trawlers (Spain: Implications: reduction in fleet capacity partially negated  by fleet modernisation). 



As  reported  in  2007  effort  levels  by  Irish  vessels  in  the  Porcupine  Bank  Nephrops  fishery  have  increased  significantly  with  approximately  12–14  boats  consistently  participating  in  this  fishery  in  2006–2008.  Landings  are  reported to be stable with most vessels landing 8–10 tonnes of Nephrops for  7–10 day trips. 3–4 vessels are now freezing Nephrops on board and landing  to lucrative markets in Spain. Fishermen report that nephrops have tended  to be of a much smaller size range in 2007. There was also a high percent‐ age of females (> 75%) in some areas and this has resulted in lower returns  to vessels (average of €9/kg for males compared to 5/kg for females). (Ire‐ land: Implications: Shift of effort into different fisheries). 



Despite the closure of the hake gillnet fishery in Areas VIIb‐k in depths >  200m for part of 2006, and subsequent regulations introduced in 2007 that  restrict  the  length  of  gear  and  soak  time  in  the  hake  fishery,  Irish  gillnet  fishermen reported that the 2007/2008 hake fishery was in fact quite poor  contrary to the scientific advice. Irish gillnetters tend to work in depths be‐ tween  200–300m.  Many  vessels  switched  back  to  trawling  due  to  poor  catches  and  there  are  now  only  7–8  gillnet  vessels  >  12m  left  in  the  fleet  and 3–4 of these have applied for decommissioning reflected the poor re‐ turns in recent years. (Ireland: Reduction in effort). 



 4–5  Irish  whitefish  vessels  (all  24m+  vessels)  have  increased  effort  in  the  Rockall  fishery  in  2006,  moving  from  the  monkfish  and  mixed  monkfish,  megrim,  hake  fisheries  in  Areas  VIIb‐k  to  VIb.  (Ireland;  Implications:  Quota restrictions/Changes in fleet Dynamics). 



There has been a recent shift in effort by 4–5 Irish vessels from traditional  grounds in VIIj,g to areas further south to west of the Sicily Isles and into  Area VIIh. This is to try and avoid catching cod and these vessels are tar‐ geting a combination of mixed demersal species, primarily hake and non‐ quota species such as John Dory, red mullet. (Ireland: Implications: Shift in  effort to other areas). 



The UK beam trawlers have reduced fishing activity levels due to high fuel  prices. Many are now focussing on scalloping as opposed to fish. (UK: Im‐ plications: reduced fishing effort).  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



| 135

The Irish scallop fleet based in the south east of Ireland has been rebuild‐ ing  after  a  bleak  number  of  years  and  since  decommissioning  was  intro‐ duced  in  2005.  After  a  period  of  reduction  or  stagnation  there  is  now  8  >  10m vessels (1 vessel < 15m) and 3–4 < 10m vessels either participating or  preparing  to  participate  in  the  scallop  fishery.  This  adds  up  to  around  1850kw (> 10m), which is still well under the capacity limit of 4,800kw. In‐ dications are that many fishermen are looking at this fishery as an attrac‐ tive  option  and  this  illustrates  that  there  is  a  need  to  introduce  management  measures  to  protect  scallop  stocks  before  effort  increases  to  fill the capacity limit (Ireland: Implications: shift of effort into scallop sec‐ tor). 

Technological Creep •

There is renewed interest in seining by vessels on the south coast. Several  20–24m vessels have switched from trawling (monkfish) back to seining to  reduce  operating  costs.  However,  there  are  reports  of  discarding/high  grading  by  seiners  due  to  low/fluctuating  prices  for  round  haddock  and  also  due  to  quota  restrictions.  There  are  now  10  or  more  seiners  on  the  south coast compared to only 4–5 in 2006. These vessels use 90mm north of  51° N and 100mm south of 51°N. (Ireland: Implications: Move to different  fishing method).  



As reported in 2007 an Irish vessel is currently testing an automatic Neph‐ rops tailing machine. This vessel works almost exclusively in the Irish Sea  and  this  fishery  is  almost  a  targeted  tail  fishery  given  the  small  size  of  Nephrops. The prototype machine has proven quite effective but many fish‐ ermen  involved  in  the  Irish  Sea  nephrops  fishery  have  expressed  reserva‐ tions  at  the  widespread  utilisation  of  such  machines  as  it  may  lead  to  increased levels of effort in areas with an abundance of small nephrops. An  introduction of a voluntary ban on landing tailed nephrops above a certain  count  per  kg  (80–100  tails/kg)  have  been  muted  by  fishermen  and  co‐ operative  managers  to  counter  this  and  discourage  the  targeting  of  small  nephrops. (Ireland: Increased efficiency). 

Technical Conservation Measures •

Vessels targeting Nephrops in ICES areas VIIIa and VIIIb are now given the  option to used one of three methods to improve size selectivity of Nephrops  i) increased mesh size (70 to 80mm), ii) drop out panel (60mm square mesh  belly panel) or, iii) a semi‐rigid grid (13mm). It is unclear what the uptake  is  of  each  device,  but  reduction  of  Nephrops  discards  (<9cm  TL)  for  each  device  are  estimated  as  follows:  35%  for  the  13mm  grid,  30%  for  80mm,  25%  for  square  mesh  drop  out  panel  (France:  Implications:  changes  in  length profile of Nephrops catches).  



In 2006, square mesh panel (100 mm inner opening) on the top of the rear  tapered section of the trawl, to decrease catches of juvenile hakes in Neph‐ rops  fishery  in  the  Bay  of  Biscay  [Council  regulation  (EC)  n°  51/2006  (22  December  2005)  and  41/2007  (21December  2006);  Council  regulation  (EC)  n°  40/2008  (16  January  2008)  and  41/2007  (21December  2006)].  It  is  esti‐ mated that this has resulted in a 25% reduction in the retention of under‐ size hake.  

 

136 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Belgium  beam  trawlers  operating  in  VIIg  are  reported  to  be  using  larger  mesh (150mm) belly panels in order to reduce retention of weed and other  benthos. Belgium fishermen’s organisations are promoting the use of ben‐ thic drop out panels and full square mesh cod‐ends and uptake is likely to  steadily  increase.  One  vessel  is  currently  using  these  devices  voluntarily  but  other  vessels  are  scheduled  to  adopt  these  modifications  during  2008  (Belgium:  Implications:  reduced  bycatch  of  non‐target  species  and  im‐ proved gadoid selectivity).  



Belgium beam trawlers have tended towards the use of chain matrix gear  over traditional tickler chain nets due to the lower towing speed and asso‐ ciated reductions in fuel consumption (Belgium: Implications: reduction in  overall swept area).  



Encouraged by access rights, Basque vessels which target mixed demersal  species  in  VIIIabd  close  to  the  French  coast,  are  voluntarily  using  square  mesh panels to reduce discards (Spain: Implications: discard reduction). 



Effort in the deepwater gillnet fisheries for hake has remained very high in  2007, particularly in the southwest Porcupine area. There are still repeated  claims  by  Irish  fishermen  that  there  is  widespread  use  of  100mm  mesh  nets, which is illegal in Area VII. The Irish Naval Service has arrested sev‐ eral of these vessels for breaches of regulations including the use of under‐ size  mesh.  (Ireland:  Implications:  Reduced  selectivity  through  the  use  of  small mesh size). 

Ecosystem Effects

 



Predation of fish catches by Grey seals from gillnet/tangle net fisheries has  become an increasing problem on the south coast of Ireland. Many inshore  gillnet  fishermen  are  considering  shifting  into  other  fisheries  as  the  prob‐ lems has become so bad. One fisherman (12m vessel) reported 100% losses  from tangle net gear targeting monkfish, ray and turbot from one particu‐ lar  set  and  average  losses  to  seals  of  between  50%‐75%  as  commonplace.  There  has  also  been  an  increase  in  gear  damage.  As  many  as  20  or  more  vessels maybe affected by this phenomenon. (Ireland: Implications: Preda‐ tion to fish catches). 



There  has  been  a  considerable  increase in  the quantities  of  small nephrops  on the Smalls grounds in 2007 and 2008 leading to very high landings by  boats from the East coast with a high proportion of tails to whole nephrops.  There are a number of boats (up to 10 vessels) that have participated in this  fishery but do not tail due to low crew numbers and this has lead to high  discarding/upgrading. It is also reported that the seasonal Cod Closures in  the Celtic Sea have lead to a shift in effort by nephrops vessels to the west  side of the ground leading to the size of nephrops noticeably reducing as ef‐ fort increases. When the boxes have reopened, initial landings taken within  the box on the east of the ground have comprised a high proportion of lar‐ ger whole nephrops. The introduction of these boxes has completed shifted  the previous pattern in the Smalls fishery. (Ireland: Implications: Negative  impacts of technical measure e.g. closed area). 



High discarding of cod in Area VIIb‐k was reported in Q3 and Q4 in 2007  due to exhaustion of quota. This has been repeated in 2008, when 80%+ of  the quota in the Celtic Sea Area was caught by mid‐March. Discarding has  been widespread across all Irish demersal fleets. An example of the scale is 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 137

reports  from  the  owner  of  one  seine  net  vessel,  who  discarded  over  30  boxes  of  marketable  cod  (1–1½  tonnes)  from  one  5–6  day  trip.  The  prob‐ lems in 2008 have been put down to poor quota management which effec‐ tively  led  to  unrestricted  landings  during  February‐March.  Heaviest  landings were made by the Irish gillnet fleet of around 6–8 vessels. Heavy  landings led to very low prices and cod were sold as low as €1.20–1.40/kg  during this period. (Ireland: Discarding).  •

As  in  2007,  vessels  are  now  discarding  0–500g  and  500–1kg  monkfish  to  meet quota restrictions. This discarding is reportedly at quite a high level,  particularly in around 200m‐400m. (Ireland: Discarding). 

Development of New Fisheries •

A portion of the Belgium beam trawl fleet operating in VIId and VIIe has  targeted squid and cuttlefish during the winter months (Belgium: Implica‐ tions: partial switch towards non‐quota and non‐assessed species). 



Despite poor results from experimental trials carried out in 2007 by BIM, a  potential  fishery  for  deepwater  rose  shrimp  is  being  explored  by  an  Irish  vessel  off  the  south  west  coast.  This  vessel  has  landed  samples  of  frozen  rose  shrimp  from  400–800m  using  standard  scarper  trawls  with  80mm  codend  mesh  size  and  is  reportedly  gearing  up  with  two  specially  de‐ signed shrimp trawls with 32mm codend mesh size. (Ireland: new fishery  for non‐quota species). 

A n n e x 8 b : F T F B r e p o r t to W GB F A S This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  on  ecosystem  effects  in  the  Baltic  Sea  and  Kattegat.  No  other relevant information was given.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in Baltic; information was obtained from Sweden only.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics 2007 to 2008 •

In  the  first  quarter  of  2008,  the  number  of  vessels  fishing  in  the  Kattegat  has decreased due to an increased effort cost (2.5 days at sea per effort day  deployed). This effort has mainly been reallocated to the Skagerrak and the  Baltic Sea. Vessels without the possibility to change area have mainly tar‐ get  Nephrops  using  grid‐equipped  trawls  (This  gear  type  is  not  subject  to  the  new  effort  limitation).  (Sweden:  Implications:  reallocation  of  effort  from Kattegat towards the Baltic and Skagerrak.) 



In  the  recent years  there  has  been an  increase  in  the numbers  of Swedish  Nephrops vessels. This has contributed to subsequent increases in effort and  landings  during  2006–2007  with  the  highest  historical  catch  rates.  The  in‐ crease in number of vessels may be attributed to input of new capital trans‐ ferred  from  pelagic  fleets  after  the  introduction  of  an  ITQ‐system  for  pelagic species. (Sweden: Implications: increased effort). 

Technical Conservation Measures •

In the Swedish trawler fleet there has been a steady increase in uptake of  the  Nephrops  grid  since  introduction  into  legislation  in  2004.  Approxi‐  

138 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

mately 75% of the Nephrops trawlers operating in IIIa used the grid at some  time  of  the  year  during  2006  and  2007  (40%  of  Nephrops  trawl  landings).  This can be explained by the fact that use is mandatory on coastal waters  and that there are strong incentives due to unlimited days at sea. (Sweden:  Implications: Improved selectivity in Nephrops fisheries).   •

During the first Quarter of 2008 a “day at sea” in Kattegat without the grid  was  counted  as  2.5  days.  This  has  further  increased  the  incentives  to  use  the sorting grid to the point were 80% of all Nephrops landings in the first  quarter  of  2008  were  caught  with  sorting  grids  (20%  previous  years).  (Sweden: Implications: changed effort allocation from cod towards Neph‐ rops, decreased discard rates of roundfish). 

Ecosystem Effects •

The Swedish Baltic cod trawl fishery has been concentrating effort close to  the  coastal  areas  of  25W,  both  due  to  a  high  abundance  of  fish  and  high  fuel prices. This costal area has been considered to be an important nursing  area for predominately juvenile cod and discarding maybe high. (Implica‐ tions: potential increased discard rates of juvenile cod). 

A n n e x 8 c: F T F B r e p o r t to W GN S D S This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system  effects;  and  the  development  of  new  fisheries  in  the  Northern  Shelf  Assessment Area including the Irish Sea.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in Northern Shelf fisheries; information was obtained from Ireland,  the UK, Belgium, Netherlands and France.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics 2007 to 2008

 



There  has  been  a  shift  for  Scottish  vessels  from  using  100mm‐110mm  for  whitefish on the west coast ground (area VI) to 80mm Nephrops codends in  the North Sea (area IV). Fuel costs are a major driver, in this and all fisher‐ ies. (Scotland: Implications: Effort shift Via to Iva, and less selective gear,  bycatch/discards). 



There is a new 2008 Scottish Conservation Credits scheme, with a number  of implications: 



In early 2008, a one‐net rule was introduced in Scotland as part of the new  Conservation credits scheme. This is likely to improve the accuracy of re‐ porting of landings to the correct mesh size range. Another element of the  package is the standardisation of the mesh size rules for twin rig vessels so  that 80mm mesh can be used in both Areas IV and VI (north of 56°N) by  twin rig vessels – previously the minimum mesh size for twin rig in area  VI  was  100mm.  As  a  result  there  may  be  some  migration  of  twin  riggers  from area IV to area VI, thus switching effort from IV to VI. (Scotland: Im‐ plications: Selectivity is not expected to change greatly for prawns because  80mm nets must be made of 4mm single twine whereas 100mm nets were  allowed  to  use  5mm  double  twine.  Whitefish  selection  may  improve  be‐

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 139

cause  from  July  2008,  all  nets  in  the  80mm  range  will  have  to  have  a  110mm square mesh panel installed).  •

 Scottish seiners have been granted a derogation from the 2 net  rule until  end  Jan  2009  to  continue  to  carry  2  nets  (e.g.  100–119mm  as  well  as  120+mm). They are required to record landings from each net on a separate  logsheet  and  to  carry  observers  when  requested.  (Scotland:  Implications:  Potential for misreporting by mesh category). 



 From  February  2008  there  has  been  a  concerted  effort  not  to  target  cod.  Real time closures and gear measures are designed to reduce cod mortal‐ ity. The implication is that there will be greater effort exerted on haddock,  whiting, monk, flats and Nephrops. (Scotland: Implications: Switch in effort  to other species). 



During 2008 Ireland introduced a further decommissioning scheme which  aims to remove 11,140GT from the fleet register. This is targeted at vessels  over  10  years  and  >18m.  To  date  applications  represent  ~45%  of  the  total  target,  which  is  expected  to  be  over  subscribed.  The  majority  of  applica‐ tions  emanate  from  East  and  west  coast  ports  from  vessels  which  tradi‐ tionally  target  Nephrops  with  uptake  from  the  South  East  also.  No  applications  have  so  far  been  received  from  vessels  from  the  South  West  which traditionally target whitefish. It is expected that much of the actual  effort  removed  from  the  decommissioning  scheme  may  be  partially  ne‐ gated through the introduction of ~21 modern second hand vessels (mostly  ex‐French) into the fleet. These have either replaced existing older, less ef‐ ficient  vessels,  or  have  taken  advantage  of  ‘semi‐dormant’  tonnage  of  which  a  further  ~3000GT  remains.  Ireland:  Implications:  Reductions  in  Fleets but actual impact unknown). 



The increased effort by Irish vessels in the Rockall fishery reported in 2007  has continued in 2008. There are now 9–10 Irish vessels targeting this fish‐ ery  and  it  is  anticipated  that  quotas  for  haddock,  monkfish  and  megrim  will be exhausted by July/August. Current regime is 30 tonne of haddock  per  month,  which  is  barely  viable  for  the  larger  vessels  and  is  reportedly  leading to high‐grading given the volatility of the round haddock market.  Two of the largest Irish whitefish vessels (34m/2000hp) have shifted effort  from deepwater species (black scabbard, orange roughy, and grenadier) in  Area VIa and VIIb‐k to the Rockall in 2007. One of these vessels has been  subsequently  sold  out  of  the  fleet  but  at  least  4  additional  (24m+/750hp)  vessels  have  participated  in  this  fishery.  These  vessels  generally  targeted  monkfish in Area VIa and VIIb‐c. (Ireland: Implications: Shift of effort into  Rockall fishery). 



Irish vessels have reported increased activity by the Russian fleet prosecut‐ ing a small mesh fishmeal fishery for haddock both inside and outside the  EU  200  mile  limit  at  Rockall.  These  vessels  have  been  observed  on  the  grounds much earlier than in previous years. There was a peak in haddock  abundance  in  April  but  in  early  May  haddock  were  reported  scarce  and  the  Russian  vessels  left  the  grounds)  (Ireland:  Implications:  Increased  ef‐ fort on Rockall haddock stock). 



As  reported  in  2007  effort  levels  by  Irish  vessels  in  the  Porcupine  Bank  Nephrops  fishery  have  increased  significantly  with  approximately  12–14  boats  consistently  participating  in  this  fishery  in  2006–2008.  Landings  are  reported to be stable with most vessels landing 8–10 tonnes of Nephrops for   

140 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

7–10 day trips. 3–4 vessels are now freezing Nephrops on board and landing  to  lucrative  markets  in  Spain.  Most  boats  still  work  80mm  on  Porcupine  Bank  and  nephrops  have  tended  to  be  of  a  smaller  size  range  in  2007.  There was also a high percentage of females (> 75%) in some areas and this  has  resulted  in  lower  returns  to  vessels  (average  of  €9/kg  for  males  com‐ pared to 5/kg for females). (Implications: Increased effort).  •

During 2007/2008 5% of the Belgian beam trawl fleet was removed through  decommissioning.  (Belgium:  Implications:  Reductions  in  Fleets  but  actual  impact unknown).  

Technology Creep •

Shift from fish/monkfish twin trawling to single rig and an increase in the  use of pair trawl/seine. Also a shift by large powered whitefish vessels to  Nephrops and targeting North Sea grounds with double bag trawls. This is  very  much  driven  by  fuel  costs.  (Scotland:  Implications:  Probable  reduc‐ tion in LPUE, possible increase in discarding). 



In  January  2008,  multi‐rigs  (more  than  2  nets)  were  banned  under  new  Scottish legislation. However, a derogation to end April 2008 was granted  to  vessels  currently  fishing  multi‐rigs  to  continue.  Applies  to  all  Scottish  boats  everywhere.  (Scotland:  Implications:  again  some  possible  reduction  in LPUE). 



With  increasing  fuel  prices  there  has  been  a  significant  switch  by  Irish  trawlers to reduce gear size in some cases by as much as 20%. There is also  evidence  of  larger  vessels  of  once  again  switching  from  twin‐rigging  to  single  rigging  to  reduce  fuel  consumption.  In  the  24m+  range  vessels  are  now working at around 50–60% of their total power in a bid to reduce fuel  costs. (Ireland: Implications: reduction in LPUE). 



As reported in 2007 an Irish vessel is currently testing an automatic Neph‐ rops tailing machine. This vessel works almost exclusively in the Irish Sea  and  this  fishery  is  almost  a  targeted  tail  fishery  given  the  small  size  of  Nephrops. The prototype machine has proven quite effective but many fish‐ ermen  involved  in  the  Irish  Sea  nephrops  fishery  have  expressed  reserva‐ tions  at  the  widespread  utilisation  of  such  machines  as  it  may  lead  to  increased levels of effort in areas with an abundance of small nephrops. An  introduction of a voluntary ban on landing tailed nephrops above a certain  count  per  kg  (80–100  tails/kg)  have  been  muted  by  fishermen  and  co‐ operative  managers  to  counter  this  and  discourage  the  targeting  of  small  nephrops. (Implications: Increased efficiency). 

Technical Conservation Measures

 



Some of the Nephrops fleet have been  using SMP’s with mesh sizes in the  100mm  to  110mm  still  using  a  codend  mesh  size  of  80mm  x  single  4mm  twine. Also vessels have been installing the smp into the end of the tapered  section  of  the  trawl.  This  position  offers  more  stability  for  the  panel  and  reduces the chance that it can twist. Note: for current year: all twin‐rig gear  in the 80–99mm category will have to use a 110mm square mesh panel at  15–18m from the codline. This will also apply to single‐rig gears from July  2008. (Scotland: Implications: Improved selectivity). 



The  option  of  18  extra  days  if  a  120mm  SMP  at  4–9m  was  used  with  a  95mm  x  5mm  double  codend  was  not  taken  up  by  the  Scottish  Nephrops 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 141

fleet  in  2007.  The  main  reasons  were  that  fishermen  claim  that  Nephrops  would be lost due to twisting and too many marketable haddock and whit‐ ing lost which the extra days would not compensate for. In 2008 this option  attracts 39 extra days but is in competition with the Scottish Conservation  Credits option whereby 21 extra days are available when a 110mm SMP is  used  with  an  80mm  codend  so  again  uptake  is  zero.  (Scotland:  Implica‐ tions: No uptake of selective gear option).   •

There  is  possibly  a  30%  increase  in  L50  of  haddock,  whiting,  and  saithe  due to use of 110mm SMP. Smaller increase in L50 of perhaps 10% for cod  (Scotland: Implications: Improved selectivity).  



A large number of 110mm SMPs have been bought in the first months of  2008  by  the  prawn  fleet  so  that  they  qualify  for  the  basic  Conservation  Credits scheme. Probably affects most (~80%) of the fleet. (Scotland: Impli‐ cations: Uptake of selective gear). 



Problems with the introduction of the 5% bycatch limits for dogfish (Squa‐ lus  acathias)  on  west  coast  and  North  Sea  grounds.  They  can  be  encoun‐ tered  in  large  congregations  but  it  is  almost  impossible  for  vessels  to  identify them using sonar etc so they are difficult to avoid. (Scotland: Im‐ plications: likely discarding when encountering large aggregations). 



Regulations  introduced  at  the  start  of  2008  preventing  the  targeting  of  spurdog have created problems, particularly for inshore gillnetters off the  North Galway and Mayo coasts. Some 10 vessels which had earned an av‐ erage of €20k per vessel in 2007 from spurdog now have no other demersal  fishery that they can diversify into and therefore have no alternative but to  target lobster and crab with pots. Most of these vessels relied on spurdog  in 2007 to compensate earnings lost from the closure of the salmon driftnet  fishery. This regulation has also affected a small number of vessels on the  south coast and has also caused problems for trawlers which at times catch  large  quantities  of  spurdog  occasionally.  The  regulation  may  lead  to  dis‐ carding  of  this  species.  (Ireland:  Implications:  Discarding  of  dogfish  and  shift of effort into different fisheries). 



Effort in the deepwater gillnet fisheries for hake has remained very high in  2007, particularly in the southwest Porcupine area. There are still repeated  claims  by  Irish  fishermen  that  there  is  widespread  use  of  100mm  mesh  nets, which is illegal in Area VII. The Irish Naval Service has arrested sev‐ eral of these vessels for breaches of regulations including the use of under‐ size  mesh.  (Ireland:  Implications:  Reduced  selectivity  through  the  use  of  small mesh size). 



High discarding of cod in Area VIIb‐k was reported in Q3 and Q4 in 2007  due to exhaustion of quota. This has been repeated in 2008, when 80%+ of  the quota in the Celtic Sea Area was caught by mid‐March. Discarding has  been widespread across all Irish demersal fleets. An example of the scale is  reports  from  the  owner  of  one  seine  net  vessel,  who  discarded  over  30  boxes  of  marketable  cod  (1–1½  tonnes)  from  one  5–6  day  trip.  The  prob‐ lems in 2008 have been put down to poor quota management which effec‐ tively  led  to  unrestricted  landings  during  February‐March.  Heaviest  landings were made by the Irish gillnet fleet of around 6–8 vessels. Heavy  landings led to very low prices and cod were sold as low as €1.20–1.40/kg  during this period. (Ireland: Implications: High discarding). 

 

142 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



As  in  2007,  vessels  are  now  discarding  0–500g  and  500–1kg  monkfish  to  meet quota restrictions. This discarding is reportedly at quite a high level,  particularly  in  around  200m‐400m  on  the  Achill  grounds  and  Stanton  Banks (Ireland: Implications: High discarding).  

Ecosystem Effects •

Reports of problems with discarded longlines and gill nets along the Scot‐ tish  west  coast  deep  water  grounds.  A  lot  of  longline  activity  reported  at  south end Rockall plateau. (Scotland: Implications: Potential for gear con‐ flicts).  



Despite the closure of the hake gillnet fishery in Areas VIIb‐k in depths >  200m for part of 2006, and subsequent regulations introduced in 2007 that  restrict  the  length  of  gear  and  soak  time  in  the  hake  fishery,  Irish  gillnet  fishermen reported that the 2007/2008 hake fishery was in fact quite poor  contrary to the scientific advice. Irish gillnetters tend to work in depths be‐ tween  200–300m.  Many  vessels  switched  back  to  trawling  due  to  poor  catches  and  there  are  now  only  7–8  gillnet  vessels  >  12m  left  in  the  fleet  and 3–4 of these have applied for decommissioning reflected the poor re‐ turns in recent years. (Ireland: excessive gear lengths and soak times). 



Under  Natura  2000,  UK‐Scotland  has  proposed  a  SAC  on  the  Stanton  Banks off the north‐west coast of Donegal in Area VIa. The proposed area,  which would be closed to trawling, dissects the grounds fished extensively  by  Irish  vessels.  While  the  number  of  vessels  working  this  area  has  de‐ creased in the last number of years to around 5 vessels (part‐time) the im‐ pact  would  nonetheless  be  adverse.  Through  the  NWWRAC  a  case  has  been made to reduce the impact of this proposed closure (Ireland: Compli‐ ance with regulation). 

Development of New Fisheries

 



Despite poor results from experimental trials carried out in 2007 by BIM, a  potential  fishery  for  deepwater  rose  shrimp  is  being  explored  by  an  Irish  vessel  off  the  south  west  coast.  This  vessel  has  landed  samples  of  frozen  rose  shrimp  from  400–800m  using  standard  scarper  trawls  with  80mm  codend  mesh  size  and  is  reportedly  gearing  up  with  two  specially  de‐ signed shrimp trawls with 32mm codend mesh size. (Ireland: Implications:  Effort in small mesh fishery with potential for high discards). 



There  has  been  increased  catches  of  squid  reported  at  Rockall  in  Q2  of  2008.  In  previous  years  catches  of  squid  had  been much  reduced  on  1990  levels  but  one  34m/1200hp  Irish  vessel  is  now  freezing  squid  on  board.  This vessel is landing upwards of 2–3 tonne of frozen squid per trip in ad‐ dition to quantities of fresh squid caught on the last days of the trip. This is  becoming  of  increasing  importance  and  as  quotas  become  exhausted  at  Rockall;  vessels  will  undoubtedly  begin  to  target  this  fishery  more.  (Ire‐ land: Implications: targeting non‐quota species). 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 143

A n n e x 8 d : F T F B r e p o r t to W GN S S K This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system effects; and the development of new fisheries in the North Sea and Skagerrak.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all  fleets  engaged  in  North  Sea  fisheries;  information  was  obtained  from  Scotland,  England‐UK, Northern Ireland, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Sweden and Norway.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics 2007 to 2008 •

There is a gradual shift from beam trawling on flatfish to twin trawling on  other species e.g. gurnards, and Nephrops, etc. in the Dutch fleet. A number  of beam trawlers decided to shift to other techniques such as outrigging or  fly‐shooting  in  the  British  Channel.  Caused  by  TAC  limitations  of  plaice  and sole and rising fuel costs. A detailed report on trends in the NL fleet is  attached as Annex  1  to  this  section.  (Netherlands: Implications: reduction  in effort/landings of flatfish, transfer of effort to other species). 



There  has  been  a  shift  for  Scottish  vessels  from  using  100mm‐110mm  for  whitefish  on  the  west  coast  ground  (area  VI)  to  80mm  prawn  codends  in  the North Sea (area IV). Fuel costs are a major driver, in this and all fisher‐ ies. (Scotland: Implications: Effort shift Via to Iva, and less selective gear,  bycatch/discards). 



There is a new 2008 Scottish Conservation Credits scheme, with a number  of implications: 



In early 2008, a one‐net rule was introduced in Scotland as part of the new  Conservation credits scheme. This is likely to improve the accuracy of re‐ porting of landings to the correct mesh size range. Another element of the  package is the standardisation of the mesh size rules for twin rig vessels so  that 80mm mesh can be used in both Areas IV and VI (north of 56°N) by  twin rig vessels – previously the minimum mesh size for twin rig in area  VI  was  100mm.  As  a  result  there  may  be  some  migration  of  twin  riggers  from area IV to area VI, thus switching effort from IV to VI. (Scotland: Im‐ plications: Selectivity is not expected to change greatly for prawns because  80mm nets must be made of 4mm single twine whereas 100mm nets were  allowed  to  use  5mm  double  twine.  Whitefish  selection  may  improve  be‐ cause  from  July  2008,  all  nets  in  the  80mm  range  will  have  to  have  a  110mm square mesh panel installed). 



Scottish  seiners  have  been  granted  a  derogation  from  the  2  net  rule  until  end  Jan  2009  to  continue  to  carry  2  nets  (e.g.  100–119mm  as  well  as  120+mm). They are required to record landings from each net on a separate  logsheet  and  to  carry  observers  when  requested.  (Scotland:  Implications:  Potential for misreporting by mesh category) 



From  February  2008  there  has  been  a  concerted  effort  not  to  target  cod.  Real time closures and gear measures are designed to reduce cod mortal‐ ity. The implication is that there will be greater effort exerted on haddock,  whiting, monk, flats and Nephrops. (Scotland: Implications: Switch in effort  to other species).   

144 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



24  boats  were  decommissioned  in  the  beginning  of  2008  from  the  Dutch  fleet. There is also a general tendency to opt for smaller multi‐purpose ves‐ sels replacing the conventional beam trawler for fishermen left in the fleet  (Netherlands: Implications: Reduced fleet size and shift of effort into other  sectors).  



5 beam trawlers left the Belgium fleet in 2007 (approx 5%) (Belgium: Impli‐ cations: Reduced effort). 



In  the  first  quarter  of  2008,  the  number  of  vessels  fishing  in  the  Kattegat  has decreased due to an increased effort cost (2.5 days at sea per effort day  deployed). This effort has mainly been reallocated to the Skagerrak and the  Baltic Sea. Vessels without the possibility to change area have mainly tar‐ get  Nephrops  using  grid‐equipped  trawls  (This  gear  type  is  not  subject  to  the  new  effort  limitation).  (Sweden:  Implications:  reallocation  of  effort  from Kattegat towards the Baltic and Skagerrak.) 



In  the  recent years  there  has  been an  increase  in  the numbers  of Swedish  Nephrops vessels. This has contributed to subsequent increases in effort and  landings  during  2006–2007  with  the  highest  historical  catch  rates.  The  in‐ crease in number of vessels may be attributed to input of new capital trans‐ ferred  from  pelagic  fleets  after  the  introduction  of  an  ITQ‐system  for  pelagic species. (Sweden: Implications: increased effort). 



The Farne deeps Nephrops fishery has been very poor in 2008. The Nephrops  disappeared very early, so the season was very short. This will shift effort  into  other  fisheries  for  whitefish  (UK:  Implications:  increased  effort  in  other fisheries). 

Technology Creep

 



A  number  of  Dutch  beam  trawlers  are  continuing  to  investigate  the  ‘out‐ rigging’ method as an alternative to beam trawling, similar to the work in  Belgium  and  UK.  Some  boats  have  also  moved  over  to  seining  (fly‐ shooting)  (mainly  in  the  English  Channel).  (Netherlands:  Implications:  change in effort from flatfish to range of other species). 



The  Dutch  Beam  trawler  UK153  who  was  trialling  the  electrified  pulse  trawl was sold, and the skipper has opted for a smaller multi‐purpose ves‐ sel. (Netherlands: Implications: Electric bam trawl method may be obsolete  as an alternative method). 



Belgian  Beam  trawlers  are  generally  fishing  more  with  R‐nets  and  chain  matrices  than  with  V‐nets,  using  tickler  chains.  Fishing  speed  for  beam  trawls with R‐nets is generally lower. Due to high fuel prices fewer beam  trawler use  of  V‐nets.  Fewer  vessels  are  using  the  outrigger  trawls.  Some  beam  trawlers  have  changed  to  twin  trawls.  All  driven  by  fuel  price.  A  Numbers of national project investigations of beam trawl modifications are  continuing. (Belgium: Implications: Not clear, but fleet is in flux, and inves‐ tigating many alternative options for fuel and discard reduction).  



Shift in the Scottish fleet from fish/monkfish twin trawl to single rig and an  increase in the use of pair trawl/seine. Also a shift by large powered white‐ fish vessels to Nephrops and targeting North Sea grounds with double bag  trawls.  This  is  very  much  driven  by  fuel  costs.  (Scotland:  Implications:  Probable reduction in LPUE, possible increase in discarding). 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



In  January  2008,  multi‐rigs  (more  than  2  nets)  were  banned  under  new  Scottish legislation. However, a derogation to end April 2008 was granted  to  vessels  currently  fishing  multi‐rigs  to  continue.  Applies  to  all  Scottish  boats in all areas. (Scotland: Implications: again some possible reduction in  LPUE). 



There has been an increasing emphasis on the use of T90 trawls in Iceland.  Bottom  trawls  made  entirely  of  T90°  except  in  the  codend  are  now  being  constructed and 14 stern trawlers targeting cod and haddock have shifted  to  T90  trawls.  Some  other  vessels  are  experimenting  in  other  fisheries  as  well  (Nephrops  and  shrimp)  in  area  Va.  Changes  in  catchability/efficiency  are  not  known  but  this  is  being  driven  by  high  fuel  costs  as  these  trawls  have reportedly reduced drag. It is known nine T90° trawls have been sold  to different Europe countries (Iceland: Implications: not known but possi‐ bly reduced fuel consumption). 

| 145

Technical Conservation Measures •

The Dutch beam trawl fleet is sensitive to the bad reputation of beam trawl  and this is stimulating research into selective nets and reduced bottom im‐ pact. Combined research activities were started in 2007, mostly catch com‐ parison  experiments  but  there  is  an  industry  focus  to  solve  this  image  problem  (Netherlands:  Implications:  Improved  selectivity  and  reduced  bottom impact potentially). 



Some of the Nephrops fleet have been  using SMP’s with mesh sizes in the  100mm  to  110mm  still  using  a  codend  mesh  size  of  80mm  x  single  4mm  twine. Also vessels have been installing the smp into the end of the tapered  section  of  the  trawl.  This  position  offers  more  stability  for  the  panel  and  reduces the chance that it can twist. Note: for current year: all twin‐rig gear  in the 80–99mm category will have to use a 110mm square mesh panel at  15–18m from the codline. This will also apply to single‐rig gears from July  2008. (Scotland: Implications: Improved selectivity) 



The  option  of  18  extra  days  if  a  120mm  SMP  at  4–9m  was  used  with  a  95mm x 5mm double codend was not taken up by the Scottish prawn fleet  in 2007. The main reasons were that prawns would be lost due to twisting  and too many marketable haddock and whiting lost which the extra days  would not make up for. In 2008 this option attracts 39 extra days but is in  competition with the Scottish Conservation Credits option whereby 21 ex‐ tra days are available when a 110mm SMP is used with an 80mm codend.  (Scotland:  Implications:  Possibly  a  30%  increase  in  L50  of  haddock,  whit‐ ing, saithe due to use of 110mm SMP. Smaller increase in L50 of perhaps  10% for cod).  



A large number of 110mm SMPs have been bought in the first months of  2008  by  the  prawn  fleet  so  that  they  qualify  for  the  basic  Conservation  Credits scheme. Probably affects most (~80%) of the fleet. (Scotland: Impli‐ cations: Uptake of selective gear). 



Problems with the introduction of the 5% bycatch limits for dogfish (Squa‐ lus  acathias)  on  west  coast  and  North  Sea  grounds.  They  can  be  encoun‐ tered  in  large  congregations  but  it  is  almost  impossible  for  vessels  to  identify them using sonar etc so they are difficult to avoid. (Scotland: Im‐ plications: likely discarding when encountering large aggregations). 

 

146 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



In the Swedish trawler fleet there has been a steady increase in uptake of  the  Nephrops  grid  since  introduction  into  legislation  in  2004.  Approxi‐ mately 75% of the Nephrops trawlers operating in IIIa used the grid at some  time  of  the  year  during  2006  and  2007  (40%  of  Nephrops  trawl  landings).  This can be explained by the fact that use is mandatory on coastal waters  and that there are strong incentives due to unlimited days at sea. (Sweden:  Implications: Improved selectivity in Nephrops fisheries)  



During the first Quarter of 2008 a “day at sea” in Kattegat without the grid  was  counted  as  2.5  days.  This  has  further  increased  the  incentives  to  use  the sorting grid to the point were 80% of all Nephrops landings in the first  quarter  of  2008  were  caught  with  sorting  grids  (20%  previous  years).  (  Sweden:  Implications:  changed  effort  allocation  from  cod  towards  Neph‐ rops, decreased discard rates of roundfish)  



One Belgian beam trawler (1200hp) is using a combination of T90‐codend,  benthos release panel, big meshes in the top panel and roller gear. This is a  research  project  but  it  is  expected  that  more  vessels  will  be  using  larger  mesh sizes in the top panel of the beam trawl and/or T90‐ or square mesh  codends  (80mm)  and/or  the  benthos  release  panel.  Fishermen’s  organisa‐ tion  is  taking  initiatives  to  motivate  fishermen  to  use  modifications  that  reduce beam trawl discards. Four beam trawlers are planning to use tech‐ nical modifications in 2008. The driving factor for changes is generally re‐ duced fuel consumption. Implications: The use of bigger meshes in the top  panel is expected to increase the species selectivity, i.e. reduce the bycatch  of  roundfish  species,  especially  haddock  and  whiting.  (Belgium:  Implica‐ tions: improved selectivity and voluntary use of TCM). 

Ecosystem Effects •

Bycatch of benthic fauna and several non‐target fish species (e.g. gobies) in  beam  trawls.  Voluntarily  use  of  longitudinal  release  holes  in  the  lower  panel  of  the  trawl,  which  open  when  nets  are  filled  with  benthos,  and  of  Benthic Release Panels. Research is being carried out with the industry to  optimise  a  Benthic  Release  Panel  for  the  Dutch  beam  trawling  segment.  Similar  initiatives  in  Belgium  (Netherlands  &  Belgium:  Implications:  re‐ duced benthic impact). 



Reports of problems with discarded longlines and gill nets along the Scot‐ tish west coast deep water grounds and in the northern North Sea. A lot of  longline activity reported at south end Rockall plateau. (Scotland: Implica‐ tions: potential for gear conflicts/ghost fishing).  

Development of New Fisheries

 



There  has  been  an  increase  by  Dutch  vessels  in  Nephrops  fisheries  using  twin trawls. Outrigger trawls are also replacing beam trawls, or flyshoot‐ ing  (seining)  mainly  for  non‐quota  species  such  as  red  mullet  and  cuttle‐ fish. (Netherlands: Implications: These are not new fisheries but represent  new trend in Dutch fishing resulting in effort and target species shift. Full  implications not yet known).  



Belgium: wide range of experimental new fisheries being tried in Belgium  – see Annex 2 



Squid fishery in Moray Firth continues to develop when species available  on grounds, using very unselective 40mm mesh. Not much take‐up in 2007 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 147

due  to  few  squid.  (Scotland:  Implications:  40  mm  mesh  means  potential  high  bycatch  of  young  gadoids  esp.  cod  and  haddock.  This  fishery  may  provide  an  alternative  outlet  for  the  Nephrops  fleet  seasonally,  and  hence  reduce effort in that sector).  Economic report on Netherlands fishing fleet 2007 This information is taken from:  Taal, C., Bartelings, H., Klok, A., van Oostenbrugge,  J.A.E. 2007. Fisheries in figures 2007. The  Hague, LEI, 2007, Report PR 07.04; ISBN 978–90–8615–192–9.  

General The revenue of 438 million euros generated by the Dutch high‐sea and coastal fisher‐ ies in 2006 was slightly lower than in the previous year. The total turnover, including  the fish farming sector (48 million euros), amounted to 486 million euros.  The cutter fleetʹs revenue increased (by 7%) to 256 million euros. The large high‐sea  fishing fleet recorded a landing value of 125 million euros, a decline of al‐most 9% as  compared to 2005. The mussel farming sectorʹs revenue fell by 7 million euros to 49  million euros (‐12%).  The active high‐sea and coastal fishing fleet was comprised of 440 vessels, al‐most the  same number as in the previous year. The number of jobs provided by the fisheries  sector  declined  by  almost  8%  to  about  2,100.  Following  the  extremely  low  invest‐ ments in 2005, the sectorʹs investments almost trebled to 30 million euros in 2006.  The turnover of the Dutch fish auctions increased slightly to 336 million euros, whilst  the  volume  of  landings  declined  by  3%.  In  particular,  the  volume  of  sole  landed  in  2006  was  lower  (‐23%),  whereas  the  volume  of  plaice  increased  slightly  (+3%).  The  volume of the landings of almost all other types of fish was lower. The average land‐ ing price at the auctions rose by 3% to 3.42 euros per kg. The landings of shrimp in‐ creased slightly (2%); however, the price increased by 4%.  Cutter fisheries

The  cutter  sector  once  again  recorded  a  net  loss  in  2006  (for  the  fifth  consecutive  year).  The  economic  loss  amounted  to  ten  million  euros,  almost  the  same  as  in  the  previous year.  The  landing  value  increased  by  almost  7%  to  256  million  euros.  Although  the  de‐ ployment of the fleet declined by 2.5%, the total costs increased by the same percent‐ age as the revenue (+7%). The major cost item ‐ gas oil ‐ increased by 17% in 2006. The  average price of gas oil increased to 41 Euro cents per litre (2005: 35 Euro cents per  litre).  The  revenues  from  sole  increased  by  2  million  euros;  although  the  price  in‐ creased by 22%, landings fell by 16%. The revenues from plaice increased by 4 million  euros: the price was 3% higher, and landings increased by 7%. The landing value of  shrimps increased to 38 million euros, the net result of the 3% increase in volume of  landings  and  the  6%  increase  in  price.  The  total  labour  income  from  cutter  fishing  (landing value less the technical costs) increased slightly to 54 million euros.  The number of vessels in the active cutter fleet fell to 344 cutters, and the total engine  power  declined  by  8%  to  304,000  horse  power.  The  number  of  crew  members  also  declined further by almost 5%, especially on the large beam‐trawling cutters. Gas‐oil  consumption remained at roughly the same level, due to the virtually unchanged de‐ ployment of the fleet.   

148 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Cutters in the 261–300 HP categories (primarily Euro cutters) recorded a total landing  value roughly equal to the level in 2005. This group exhibits a very large variation in  the costs and landing values: the highest daily landing value was 43% above average,  and the lowest 33% below. On average, the cutters operated at a net loss. The earn‐ ings of the crew members amounted to 42,000 euros, the same level as in the previous  year.  The  largest  category  of  large  beam‐trawling  cutters  (2,000  HP)  accounted  for  more  than  53%  of  the  total  engine  power.  The  deployment  of  these  cutters  increased  in  2006. Although the average landing value increased by 21%, this was insufficient to  offset the greatly increased costs (fuel). Consequently, the operations, as in 2005, re‐ corded a loss (‐89,000 euros).  Shrimp cutters with an engine power of up to 261 HP recorded a 9% increase in reve‐ nue in 2006, and the net profit amounted to 7,000 euros per vessel.  The  financial  position  of  the  cutter  sector  deteriorated  slightly  as  compared  to  the  previous year, a year in which the sectorʹs solvency had already exhibited a substan‐ tial decline. The overall cutter fisheries sectorʹs equity at the beginning of 2005 aver‐ aged about 0% of the total balance sheet capital. Investments were at a low level, and  the level of loans increased slightly. The long‐term borrowed capital now amount to  270 million euros, more than 960,000 euros per company. The net cash flow was nega‐ tive in the year under review (‐11 million euros).  The initial forecasts for the cutter fisheries sector in 2007 indicate a result equal to or  slightly higher than that in 2006, although on balance the sector will still operate at a  loss. The total deployment of the fleet is expected to remain virtually unchanged, at  just under 54 million HP days. Estimates based on the data until the end of Septem‐ ber 2007 indicate that the sectorʹs revenue will probably be slightly higher, and will  amount to a maximum of 260 million euros.  Only a small fraction of the beam‐trawler fleet will be able to operate at a profit. The  prospects  for  this  major  segment  of  the  cutter  fisheries  sector  remain  gloomy.  The  shrimp  fisheries  sector  would  appear  to  be  having  a  good  year;  shrimp  prices  have  re‐turned to a high level for the first time in many years (a few dozen percent higher),  and it would seem that the problems encountered by the sector for many years have  come to an at least temporary end. The smaller shrimp cutters, in particular, will be  able to close the year with a profit. In analogy with the previous year, the twin‐rigs  and snurrevod (Danish nets) would once again be appearing to achieve reasonable to  good results.  The cutter fisheries sectorʹs labour income and net results have, in general, remained  stagnant  during  the  past  years.  These  are  estimated  to  amount  to  about  54  million  euros, roughly the same level as in 2006.  A restructuring round is scheduled for the end of 2007, and consequently the size of  the fleet will probably decline by some 24 cutters (primarily beam‐trawlers) to a total  active fleet of 320 vessels. When expressed in terms of capacity (in HP), the size of the  fleet will probably decrease by at least 15% (when expressed in terms of the flatfish  fleet, about 20%).  Large-scale high-seas fishing (pelagic fleet)

The  size  and  composition  of  the  large  high‐sea  fishing  fleet  changed  once  again,  in  analogy  with  2005,  following  the  sale  of  a  further  two  vessels  outside  the  Nether‐ lands. The fleet now totals 13 freezer trawlers. With the exception of a limited num‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 149

ber  of  relatively  minor  renovations  of  the  vessels,  virtually  no  further  investments  were made in the fleet. The total deployment in terms of days at sea was 12% lower,  primarily due to the reduced size of the fleet. Fishing declined, in particular in Afri‐ can  waters.  A  new  development  was  the  deployment  of  one  trawler  in  the  fishing  grounds  around  Chile  and  Peru  (international  waters).  Landings  decreased  as  com‐ pared to the previous year by 19%, to a little over 378,000 tonnes of fish. Landings of  herring,  blue  whiting  and  sardinella,  in  particular,  exhibited  a  substantial  decline.  Only Atlantic horse mackerel landings increased.  The  total  costs  fell  by  9%,  primarily  due  to  the  reduced  deployment.  Following  the  great increase in the price of fuel (fuel oil), this cost item now accounts for 18% of the  revenue. The average price of fuel oil was 29 Euro cents per litre.  The landing value decreased by 9% to more than 125 million euros, a decline of more  than 11 million euros. The fleet closed 2006 with a net profit of almost 7 million euros.  Table showing changes in the Belgian Fleet 2006–2008.  2006/2007

2007/2008

Outrigger trawl fisheries  (mixed fisheries) 

4 beam trawlers 

2 beam trawlers (and 1 on  project scale, aiming for squid,  see below) 

Handline fisheries for seabass  (seasonally: May‐October,  ICES‐Subarea IVc) 

1 catamaran 

2 catamarans (one new vessel,  replacing a beam trawler) 

Scallop dredging in ICES‐ Subarea VIId and VIIe  (seasonally, during winter  months) 

None. 

1 beam trawler is now scallop  dredging. 

Squid fisheries (project scale) 

Several beam trawlers target  squid and cuttlefish in winter  months in ICES‐Subarea VII 

Next to those beam trawlers, 2  beam trawlers will target squid  and cuttlefish (one with an  outrigger trawl and one with a  twintrawl) 

None. 

3 netters (generally using  trammel nets for sole and/or  gill nets for cod) will conduct  experimental trials for the  mentioned passive fishing  methods. 

Fisheries on project scale:  i.

Gill net fisheries for  turbot (ICES‐Subarea  IVc) 

ii.

Gill net fisheries for  cuttlefish (ICES‐ Subarea IVc) 

iii.

Gill net fisheries for  sole (ICES‐Subarea  VIIf) 

iv.

Whelk pots (ICES‐ Subarea VIIe) 

v.

Pots for cuttlefish  (ICES‐Subarea IVc) 

vi.

Longlining for seabass 

 

150 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

A n n e x 8 e : F T F B r e p o r t to W GW I D E This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system  effects;  and  the  development  of  new  fisheries  in  pelagic  fisheries  for  horse  mackerel, mackerel, anchovy, sardine, herring and blue whiting.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in pelagic fisheries; information was obtained from Ireland, Nether‐ lands, UK‐Scotland, Spain (Basque Country), Norway, Faroe Islands and France.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics 2007 to 2008 •

The size and composition of the large Dutch high‐seas pelagic freezer fleet  has changed, in analogy with 2005, following the sale of a further two ves‐ sels  outside  the  Netherlands.  The  fleet  now  totals  13  freezer  trawlers.  Landings of herring, blue whiting and sardinella, in particular, exhibited a  substantial decline. Only Atlantic horse mackerel landings have increased  (Netherlands: Reduced number of vessels). 



The  Scottish  fleet  stands  at  23  vessels  and  new  builds  are  continuing  to  take place. Average age of vessels is now 6–8 years (Scotland: Improved ef‐ ficiency). 



No changes are reported in the Norwegian Pelagic Fleet. 



Rising fuel prices has meant that a very high percentage of the total quotas  for  pelagic  species  have  been  landed  locally  by  Irish  vessels  this  season.  Proximity  of  fish  to  port  is  now  a  driving  factor  in  determining  port  of  landing compared to a few years ago when Irish vessels preferred to steam  to Norway or Scotland to land due to higher prices for mackerel. This has  been  a  positive  development  to  the  processing  industry  in  Killybegs  (Ire‐ land: Implications: shift in fishing effort). 



Most  of  Irish  blue  whiting  quota in 2008  has  been frozen for  human  con‐ sumption instead  of  reduction  to  fish meal.  This  has  been a  very  positive  development  and  the  fish  processing  factories  for  the  first  time  have  re‐ ported  making  profits  from  the  blue  whiting  fishery.  Irish  landings  have  been  supplemented  by  Norwegian,  Danish  and  Faroese  vessels  (Ireland:  Implications: increasing focus on blue whiting fishery). 

Technological Creep •

Two  Icelandic  pelagic  trawlers  and  three  bottom  trawlers  have  changed  from using steel wires to dynex warps. Changes in the type of warps in the  pelagic fishery for blue whiting and to some extent for herring in area Va,  Vb,  VIa  and  VIb.  Some  reports  of  this  in  Scottish  and  Irish  pelagic  fleet  also.  (Iceland:  Implications:  Not  known,  probably  improved  in  fuel  effi‐ ciency). 

Technical Conservation Measures •

 

In  the  Blue  whiting  fishery,  both  Icelandic  and  Faroese  vessels  are  using  flexible  grids  with  55  mm  between  bars  to  exclude  cod  and  saithe  from 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 151

catches  of  blue  whiting.  Trials  with  this  approach  being  conducted  in  Norway,  no  uptake  yet.  (Iceland  &  Faroe  Islands:  Implications:  There  are  predominantly large cod and saithe in the areas where the Blue whiting is  caught,  thus  the  grid  is  believed  to  reduce  bycatch  of  those  species  by  >90%. 80% uptake)   •

Pelagic  vessels  in  Scotland  and  Ireland  have  been  fitting  escape  grids/panels.  These  are  believed  to  allow  release  of  juvenile  mackerel,  horse  mackerel  and  herring.  Recent  trials  gave  equivocal  results.  Uptake  around 50% in Irish fleet and 10% in Scottish fleets. (Scotland and Ireland:  Implications: possible reduced mortality on recruiting year classes, but no  data  on  survival  rates  from  escaping  fish  is available  and  therefore  could  be a source of unaccounted mortality).  

Ecosystem effects •

As reported in 2006 and 2007, management regulations in the scad fishery,  restricting the bycatch of mackerel to 5% has lead to widespread slipping  in  the  pelagic  fisheries  when  catches  have  been  mixed.  This  discarding  is  reported  to  be  substantial.  There  is  also  evidence  of  high  grading  in  the  mackerel  fishery  as  due  to  economic  pressures  vessels  are  only  landing  mackerel of 300g+ and discarding catches of smaller fish. Again the levels  of  discarding  are  quite  high  compared  to  actual  reported  landings  (Scot‐ land: Implications: discarding). 



Norwegian trials estimated mortality of mackerel after crowding and slip‐ ping  in  purse  seines  has  been  continuing. Three  trials  were  completed  in  2007, crowding for 10–15 min, gave mortality rates of 80–100%. Work will  continue  with  herring  in  2008  and  a  large  project  is  planned  for  2009,  which  will  also  include  new  design  of  the  purse  seine,  cooperation  with  the industry (Norway: Implications: unaccounted fishing mortality). 

New Fisheries •

Up  to  eight  of  the  pelagic  vessels  have  continued  to  fish  for  boarfish  (Capros aper) during Q4 2007 and Q1 2008. Two vessels fished for this spe‐ cies in 2006 and approximately 8 vessels in 2007. With the very short fish‐ ing  time  now  on  all  of  the  pelagic  species  this  new  fishery  has  been  identified as an opportunity to extend the vessels operating time. The fish  are  suitable  only  for  fishmeal  production  with  a  good  quality  oil  content  (between 8–10%) but discharging from the vessels and handling in the fac‐ tories  is  proving  very  difficult  with  the  discharge  in  particular  an  ex‐ tremely  slow  process. Nonetheless  landings  by  Irish  vessels  have  continued to increase and are now probably in excess of 5,000–6,000 tonnes  valued at around €1 million. An initial biological study reports that fishing  effort  has  not  had  any  significant  impact  on  the  stock  but  without  man‐ agement measures the stock may come under pressure quite quickly given  it  is  a  relatively  slow  growing  pelagic  species.  (Ireland:  Development  of  new fishery for species with limited scientific data available). 

 

152 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

A n n e x 8 f: F T F B Rep o r t to AFW G This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system effects; and the development of new fisheries in the Arctic Fisheries areas.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in fisheries; information was obtained from Iceland, Faroe Islands  and Norway.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics 2007 to 2008 •

In  the  Faroese  pair  trawler  fleet  mainly  targeting  saithe  there  has  been  a  substantial change in resent years. One of the major shipowner with eight  vessels (four pairs) was allowed by the Fisheries Ministry to replace these  old vessels with six new vessels. The new vessels were slightly larger but  by  reducing  the  number  from  eight  to  six  vessels  the  total  size  (length,  width,  depth)  and  power  (kW)  should  be  maintained.  The  first  new  pair  was introduced in late 2002. After one year in operation these two vessels  were able to land twice as much fish as an old pair (FTFBWG, 2004). The  second pair started fishing in October 2007 and the third pair in December  2007. No estimate has been made of the increase in fishing capacity of the  latter  two  pairs  compared  to  old  vessels  (Faroe  Islands:  Implications:  In‐ creased efficiency).  



In the Faroese fleet of small trawlers (Hp<500) vessels are now using spe‐ cific  trawls  in  specific  fisheries  as  compared  to  general  standard  trawls  used  for  many  different  fish  species.  The  motivation  for  this  is  high  fuel  prices (Faroe Islands: Implications: more targeted fisheries). 



As a result of increasing fuel prices several large Faroese ʹDeep‐Seaʹ trawl‐ ers have plans to move to pair trawling (Faroe Islands: Implications: shift  to different fisheries).  



There  has  been  a  reduction  of  2%  by  tonnage  in  the  Icelandic  large  stern  trawler  fleet  and  a  reduction  of  45  by  number  and  5%  by  tonnage  in  the  rest of the dermersal fleet between 2006 and 2007. There were 107 Icelandic  boats that opted for decommissioning in 2007 or 11.8% of the fleet (Iceland:  Implications: reduced vessel numbers).  



At  least  five  large  Icelandic  stern  trawlers  have  switched  from  single  to  twin  rig  trawling  targeting  cod  and  haddock  (Iceland:  Implications  re‐ duced LPUE) 

Technology Creep

 



Faroese pair‐trawlers are planning experiments with double trawls instead  of a single trawl (Faroe Islands: Implication: increased gear efficiency).  



The ʹfishing‐dayʹ management system has been in place in the Faroes since  1996.  Several  stakeholders  in  the  fishing  industry  have  raised  their  con‐ cerns that the management system is undermined due to technical creep in  the Faroese fishing fleet. The Fisheries Ministry has appointed a committee  to  describe  developments  and  estimate  technical  creep  in  the  different 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 153

parts  of  the  Faroese  fishing  fleet.  This  committee  will  report  in  June  2008  (Faroe Islands: Implications: identification of technology creep impacts).  •

Three  Icelandic  bottom  trawlers  have  changed  from  using  steel  wires  to  dynex warps to improve fuel efficiency (Iceland: Implications: reduced fuel  consumption).  



There has been an increasing emphasis on the use of T90 trawls in Iceland.  Bottom  trawls  made  entirely  of  T90°  except  in  the  codend  are  now  being  constructed and 14 stern trawlers targeting cod and haddock have shifted  to  T90  trawls.  Some  other  vessels  are  experimenting  in  other  fisheries  as  well  (Nephrops  and  shrimp).  All  in  area  Va.  Changes  in  catchabil‐ ity/efficiency are not known but this is being driven by high fuel costs as  these  trawls  have  reportedly  reduced  drag.  It  is  known  nine  T90°  trawls  have  been  sold  to  different  Europe  countries  (Iceland:  Implications:  not  known but possibly reduced fuel consumption). 



Two  Icelandic  boats  are  using an  underwater  camera  system  as  an  aid  in  the  Sea  cucumber  fishery  using  dredges  (Iceland:  Implications:  increased  efficiency). 

Ecosystem effects •

In Iceland changes in length distributions on the fishing grounds with lar‐ ger  rates  of  small  haddock  reported  in  some  areas. Due  to  the  amount  of  small  haddock,  Mls  regulations  were  reduced  from  45cm  to  41cm.  This  meant  some  closed  areas  were  opened  although  many  remained  closed  due to high catch of small cod (<55cm) (Iceland: Implications: increased ef‐ fort on haddock stock). 



Following  reduction  in  cod  quotas  but  increased  quotas  for  haddock,  the  Icelandic  fleet  has  begun  targeting  haddock  with  all  demersal  fishing  gears. Most vessels avoid catching cod, which is now taken as bycatch (Ice‐ land: Implications: increased effort on haddock). 



Some  Icelandic  gillnetters  have  shifted  over  to  longlines.  Exact  numbers  are not known. This reduction has been a result of pressures over bycatch  of  seabirds  and  small  cetaceans.  The  level  of  bycatch  is  not  known  but  is  felt  to  be  quite  high  given  the  shifts  in  fishing  method  (Iceland:  Implica‐ tions: reduced impact on marine mammal and seabird bycatch). 



One  Norwegian  vessel  has  carried  out  experiments  using  pelagic  trawl  doors fished off the seabed (approx. 5 m) with a clump (weight) connected  50 m behind the doors to ensure proper bottom contact. This method is be‐ ing used to target demersal trawl fishing for gadoids in the Barents Sea but  with  reduced  seabed  contact  (Norway:  Implications:  reduced  bottom  im‐ pact). 

Development of New Fisheries •

A new fishery has developed in Iceland for sea cucumber. This new fishery  has  not  significantly  removed  effort  from  other  fisheries.  But  after  a  col‐ lapse  in  the  scallop  stock  (Breiðafjörður  2003  Chlamys  islandica)  some  smaller fish boats previously targeting scallops have now shifted to the cu‐ cumber  fisheries  (Iceland:  Implications:  shift  of  effort  from  scallop  fisher‐ ies). 

 

154 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

A n n e x 8 g : F T F B Rep o r t to W G E C O / W G M M E / W G D E E P Ecosystem effects

 



Predation of fish catches by Grey seals from gillnet/tangle net fisheries has  become an increasing problem on the south coast of Ireland. Many inshore  gillnet  fishermen  are  considering  shifting  into  other  fisheries  as  the  prob‐ lems has become so bad. One fisherman (12m vessel) reported 100% losses  from tangle net gear targeting monkfish, ray and turbot from one particu‐ lar  set  and  average  losses  to  seals  of  between  50%‐75%  as  commonplace.  There  has  also  been  an  increase  in  gear  damage.  As  many  as  20  or  more  vessels maybe affected by this phenomenon. (Ireland: Implications: Preda‐ tion to fish catches) 



There  has  been  a  considerable  increase in  the quantities  of  small nephrops  on the Smalls grounds in 2007 and 2008 leading to very high landings by  boats from the East coast with a high proportion of tails to whole nephrops.  There are a number of boats (up to 10 vessels) that have participated in this  fishery but do not tail due to low crew numbers and this has lead to high  discarding/upgrading. It is also reported that the seasonal Cod Closures in  the Celtic Sea have lead to a shift in effort by nephrops vessels to the west  side of the ground leading to the size of nephrops noticeably reducing as ef‐ fort increases. When the boxes have reopened, initial landings taken within  the box on the east of the ground have comprised a high proportion of lar‐ ger whole nephrops. The introduction of these boxes has completed shifted  the previous pattern in the Smalls fishery. (Ireland: Implications: Negative  impacts of technical measure e.g. closed area). 



High discarding of cod in Area VIIb‐k was reported in Q3 and Q4 in 2007  due to exhaustion of quota. This has been repeated in 2008, when 80%+ of  the quota in the Celtic Sea Area was caught by mid‐March. Discarding has  been widespread across all Irish demersal fleets. An example of the scale is  reports  from  the  owner  of  one  seine  net  vessel,  who  discarded  over  30  boxes  of  marketable  cod  (1–1½  tonnes)  from  one  5–6  day  trip.  The  prob‐ lems in 2008 have been put down to poor quota management which effec‐ tively  led  to  unrestricted  landings  during  February‐March.  Heaviest  landings were made by the Irish gillnet fleet of around 6–8 vessels. Heavy  landings led to very low prices and cod were sold as low as €1.20–1.40/kg  during this period. (Ireland: Discarding) 



As  in  2007,  vessels  are  now  discarding  0–500g  and  500–1kg  monkfish  to  meet quota restrictions. This discarding is reportedly at quite a high level,  particularly in around 200m‐400m. (Ireland: Discarding)  



Reports of problems with discarded longlines and gill nets along the Scot‐ tish  west  coast  deep  water  grounds.  A  lot  of  longline  activity  reported  at  south end Rockall plateau. (Scotland: Implications: Potential for gear con‐ flicts).  



Despite the closure of the hake gillnet fishery in Areas VIIb‐k in depths >  200m for part of 2006, and subsequent regulations introduced in 2007 that  restrict  the  length  of  gear  and  soak  time  in  the  hake  fishery,  Irish  gillnet  fishermen reported that the 2007/2008 hake fishery was in fact quite poor  contrary to the scientific advice. Irish gillnetters tend to work in depths be‐ tween  200–300m.  Many  vessels  switched  back  to  trawling  due  to  poor  catches  and  there  are  now  only  7–8  gillnet  vessels  >  12m  left  in  the  fleet 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 155

and 3–4 of these have applied for decommissioning reflected the poor re‐ turns in recent years. (Ireland: excessive gear lengths and soak times).  •

Under  Natura  2000,  UK‐Scotland  has  proposed  a  SAC  on  the  Stanton  Banks off the north‐west coast of Donegal in Area VIa. The proposed area,  which would be closed to trawling, dissects the grounds fished extensively  by  Irish  vessels.  While  the  number  of  vessels  working  this  area  has  de‐ creased in the last number of years to around 5 vessels (part‐time) the im‐ pact  would  nonetheless  be  adverse.  Through  the  NWWRAC  a  case  has  been made to reduce the impact of this proposed closure (Ireland: Compli‐ ance with regulation). 



Bycatch of benthic fauna and several non‐target fish species (e.g. gobies) in  beam  trawls.  Voluntarily  use  of  longitudinal  release  holes  in  the  lower  panel  of  the  trawl,  which  open  when  nets  are  filled  with  benthos,  and  of  Benthic Release Panels. Research is being carried out with the industry to  optimise  a  Benthic  Release  Panel  for  the  Dutch  beam  trawling  segment.  Similar initiatives in Belgium (Netherlands and Belgium: Implications: re‐ duced benthic impact). 



As reported in 2006 and 2007, management regulations in the scad fishery,  restricting the bycatch of mackerel to 5% has lead to widespread slipping  in  the  pelagic  fisheries  when  catches  have  been  mixed.  This  discarding  is  reported  to  be  substantial.  There  is  also  evidence  of  high  grading  in  the  mackerel  fishery  as  due  to  economic  pressures  vessels  are  only  landing  mackerel of 300g+ and discarding catches of smaller fish. Again the levels  of  discarding  are  quite  high  compared  to  actual  reported  landings  (Scot‐ land: Implications: discarding). 



Norwegian trials estimated mortality of mackerel after crowding and slip‐ ping  in  purse  seines  has  been  continuing. Three  trials  were  completed  in  2007, crowding for 10–15 min, gave mortality rates of 80–100%. Work will  continue  with  herring  in  2008  and  a  large  project  is  planned  for  2009,  which  will  also  include  new  design  of  the  purse  seine,  cooperation  with  the industry (Norway: Implications: unaccounted fishing mortality).  



In Iceland changes in length distributions on the fishing grounds with lar‐ ger  rates  of  small  haddock  reported  in  some  areas. Due  to  the  amount  of  small  haddock,  Mls  regulations  were  reduced  from  45cm  to  41cm.  This  meant  some  closed  areas  were  opened  although  many  remained  closed  due to high catch of small cod (<55cm) (Iceland: Implications: increased ef‐ fort on haddock stock). 



Following  reduction  in  cod  quotas  but  increased  quotas  for  haddock,  the  Icelandic  fleet  has  begun  targeting  haddock  with  all  demersal  fishing  gears. Most vessels avoid catching cod, which is now taken as bycatch (Ice‐ land: Implications: increased effort on haddock). 



Some  Icelandic  gillnetters  have  shifted  over  to  longlines.  Exact  numbers  are not known. This reduction has been a result of pressures over bycatch  of  seabirds  and  small  cetaceans.  The  level  of  bycatch  is  not  known  but  is  felt  to  be  quite  high  given  the  shifts  in  fishing  method  (Iceland:  Implica‐ tions: reduced impact on marine mammal and seabird bycatch). 



One  Norwegian  vessel  has  carried  out  experiments  using  pelagic  trawl  doors fished off the seabed (approx. 5 m) with a clump (weight) connected  50 m behind the doors to ensure proper bottom contact. This method is be‐

 

156 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

ing used to target demersal trawl fishing for gadoids in the Barents Sea but  with  reduced  seabed  contact  (Norway:  Implications:  reduced  bottom  im‐ pact).  •

In the last years it is reported that there is a growing number of sea turtles  are  accidentally  caught  by  bottom  and  pelagic  trawlers  in  the  Central  Northern Adriatic Sea. It is estimated that in this area more than 4000 tur‐ tles  per  year  are  caught  by  trawls,  longlines  and  bottom  gillnets.  Pelagic  sharks are also caught. No mitigation measures are currently enforced al‐ though  research  has  been  continuing  (Mediterranean:  Implications:  By‐ catch of targeted species). 



In  Italy  there  has  been  considerable  experimentation  with  a  new  type  of  beam  trawl  to  replace  the  traditional  Rapido  trawl.  This  trawl  is  much  more environmental friendly gear and can reduce bottom impacts. Around  4/5 fishermen from the Central Adriatic coast are currently using this new  trawl design (Italy: Implications: reduced bottom impact). 

Development of New Fisheries

 



A new fishery has developed in Iceland for sea cucumber. This new fishery  has  not  significantly  removed  effort  from  other  fisheries.  But  after  a  col‐ lapse  in  the  scallop  stock  (Breiðafjörður  2003  Chlamys  islandica)  some  smaller fish boats previously targeting scallops have now shifted to the cu‐ cumber  fisheries  (Iceland:  Implications:  shift  of  effort  from  scallop  fisher‐ ies). 



Up  to  eight  of  the  pelagic  vessels  have  continued  to  fish  for  boarfish  (Capros aper) during Q4 2007 and Q1 2008. Two vessels fished for this spe‐ cies in 2006 and approximately 8 vessels in 2007. With the very short fish‐ ing  time  now  on  all  of  the  pelagic  species  this  new  fishery  has  been  identified as an opportunity to extend the vessels operating time. The fish  are  suitable  only  for  fishmeal  production  with  a  good  quality  oil  content  (between 8–10%) but discharging from the vessels and handling in the fac‐ tories  is  proving  very  difficult  with  the  discharge  in  particular  an  ex‐ tremely  slow  process. Nonetheless  landings  by  Irish  vessels  have  continued to increase and are now probably in excess of 5,000–6,000 tonnes  valued at around €1 million. An initial biological study reports that fishing  effort  has  not  had  any  significant  impact  on  the  stock  but  without  man‐ agement measures the stock may come under pressure quite quickly given  it  is  a  relatively  slow  growing  pelagic  species.  (Ireland:  Development  of  new fishery for species with limited scientific data available). 



There  has  been  an  increase  by  Dutch  vessels  in  Nephrops  fisheries  using  twin trawls. Outrigger trawls are also replacing beam trawls, or flyshoot‐ ing  (seining)  mainly  for  non‐quota  species  such  as  red  mullet  and  cuttle‐ fish. (Netherlands: Implications: These are not new fisheries but represent  new trend in Dutch fishing resulting in effort and target species shift. Full  implications not yet known).  



Squid fishery in Moray Firth continues to develop when species available  on grounds, using very unselective 40mm mesh. Not much take‐up in 2007  due  to  few  squid.  (Scotland:  Implications:  40mm  mesh  means  potential  high  bycatch  of  young  gadoids  esp.  cod  and  haddock.  This  fishery  may  provide  an  alternative  outlet  for  the  Nephrops  fleet  seasonally,  and  hence  reduce effort in that sector). 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Despite poor results from experimental trials carried out in 2007 by BIM, a  potential  fishery  for  deepwater  rose  shrimp  is  being  explored  by  an  Irish  vessel  off  the  south  west  coast.  This  vessel  has  landed  samples  of  frozen  rose  shrimp  from  400–800m  using  standard  scarper  trawls  with  80mm  codend  mesh  size  and  is  reportedly  gearing  up  with  two  specially  de‐ signed shrimp trawls with 32mm codend mesh size. (Ireland: Implications:  Effort in small mesh fishery with potential for high discards). 



There  has  been  increased  catches  of  squid  reported  at  Rockall  in  Q2  of  2008.  In  previous  years  catches  of  squid  had  been much  reduced  on  1990  levels  but  one  34m/1200hp  Irish  vessel  is  now  freezing  squid  on  board.  This vessel is landing upwards of 2–3 tonne of frozen squid per trip in ad‐ dition to quantities of fresh squid caught on the last days of the trip. This is  becoming  of  increasing  importance  and  as  quotas  become  exhausted  at  Rockall vessels will undoubtedly begin to target this fishery more. (Ireland:  Implications: targeting non‐quota species). 



In  France  new  pot  fisheries  for  Nephrops,  octopus,  crawfish,  whelk  and  also  for  fish  (dorado  and  conger)  in  coastal  and  continental  slope  waters  are being tried (France: Implications: Development of new fisheries).  

| 157

 

158 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

A n n e x 8 h : F T F B Rep o r t to GFC M This  report  outlines  a  number  of  technical  issues  relating  to  fishing  technology  that  may impact on fishing mortality and more general ecological impacts. This includes  information  recent  changes  in  commercial  fleet  behaviour  that  may  influence  com‐ mercial CPUE estimates; identification of recent technological advances (creep); eco‐ system effects; and the development of new fisheries in the Mediterranean Sea.  It should be noted that the information contained in this report does not cover fully  all fleets engaged in fisheries; information was obtained from France and Spain.  Changes in Fleet Dynamics between 2006 and 2008 •

In France there has been a shift by the Bluefin tuna purse seine fleet from  fishing  areas  off  Balearic  islands  to  Libyan  and  Eastern  African  waters  (France: Implications: Shift in effort). 



In  France  a  targeted  decommissioning  programme  for  the  Mediterranean  fleet began last year and has begun slowly to reduce the number of older  trawlers as well as some more modern vessels. The reduction in the num‐ ber of trawlers is estimated at 20%. This programme is also targeted at the  French  tuna  purse  seiners  and  driftnetters.  (France:  Implications:  Reduc‐ tion in overall effort).  



In  France  and  Italy  the  ban  on  pelagic  driftnets  in  the  EC  has  forced  the  small scale fleets involved to shift their activity to other techniques target‐ ing  large  pelagic  species  with  longlines  and  purse  seines  by  the  Italian  fleets.  Some  French  vessels  have  also  shifted  effort  to  demersal  species  mainly  hake  and  sole  with  gillnet  and  trammels  nets.  (France  and  Italy:  Implications: Shifts of effort that may have impacts on pressure stock spe‐ cies). 



In France there have been increasing attempts to develop pot and trap fish‐ ing  particularly  in  non  trawling  areas  and  deep  slope  and  reefs  (France:  Implications: Use of more environmentally friendly fishing methods). 

Technology Creep

 



In France since 2006 a number of vessels have used high opening trawls to  target midwater fish such as hake, sea bream and sea bass. Some of these  vessels are using a specialist 4‐door rig with small pelagic doors mounted  on  the  top  wings  to  open  the  trawl.  This  has  been  driven  by  market  de‐ mand for these species (France: Implications: Increased efficiency). 



Recently some Italian bottom trawlers, mainly in the central and southern  Italian  coasts  have  switched  from  single  to  twin‐rig  trawling,  and  some  others have changed to a new “Atlantic” shapes named by the Italian fish‐ ermen: “Americana trawl” (Italy: Implications: Increased efficiency). 



The increase of fuel price has forced the French trawl fleets to reduce the  size of their gear and for some of them have shifted from high opening bot‐ tom  trawl  for  hake  to  twin  trawl  for  sole  and  monkfish  (France:  Implica‐ tions: Improved fuel efficiency). 



Both in Italy and France in the Mediterranean fisheries there has been in‐ creasing use of high specification sonars for pelagic gears and gear moni‐

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 159

toring  sensors  for  demersal  trawls.  (France  and  Italy:  Implications:  In‐ creased efficiency).  •

Both French and Italian fishermen are increasingly fitting econometeres to  monitor  fuel  consumption  and  using  thinner  twines  to  reduce  net  drag.  Some  vessels  have  also  removed  Kort  nozzles  to  improve  fuel  efficiency  (France and Italy: Implication: Improved fuel efficiency).  



In  Italian  static  gear  fisheries  there  is  increasing  use  of  net  stacking  ma‐ chines decreasing setting time. Also there is increasing use of sewing ma‐ chines for mounting the headline and leadline reducing construction times  (Italy: Implications: Improved operating efficiency). 

Technical Conservation Measures •

In the Mediterranean new EU regulations have been introduced requiring  the use of 40mm square mesh codends. The implications are not known at  present  but  in  Italy  this  represents  a  large  increase  in  mesh  size  from  codend  mesh  sizes  currently  used.  Other  regulations are  planned  to  limit  fishing  effort  through  limitations  on  bollard  pull  and  on  gear  size  by  re‐ stricting the headline length and trawl circumference; limiting the number  of  hooks  for  longlines  and  maximum  lengths  for  static  nets.  (Italy  and  France: Implications: Not known but potentially increased selectivity). 



In  France  enforcement  of  new  EC  regulations  for  the  Mediterranean  sea  has meant French Mediterranean trawlers replacing their illegal but widely  used 28 or 35 mm mesh codends with legal 40 mm diamond mesh codends  (France: Implications: Improved selectivity).  



There has been increasing efforts by French vessels in the Mediterranean to  target  small  hake  because  of  market  demand  but  this  conflicts  with  the  new Mediterranean regulations in terms of mls and may well have an im‐ pact on the French fleet (France: Implications: Potential discard problems if  mls regulations are enforced).  

Ecosystem Effects •

In the last years it is reported that there is a growing number of sea turtles  are  accidentally  caught  by  bottom  and  pelagic  trawlers  in  the  Central  Northern Adriatic Sea. It is estimated that in this area more than 4000 tur‐ tles  per  year  are  caught  by  trawls,  longlines  and  bottom  gillnets.  Pelagic  sharks are also caught. No mitigation measures are currently enforced al‐ though  research  has  been  continuing  (Mediterranean:  Implications:  By‐ catch of targeted species). 



In  Italy  there  has  been  considerable  experimentation  with  a  new  type  of  beam  trawl  to  replace  the  traditional  Rapido  trawl.  This  trawl  is  much  more environmental friendly gear and can reduce bottom impacts. Around  4/5 fishermen from the Central Adriatic coast are currently using this new  trawl design (Italy: Implications: reduced bottom impact). 

Development of New Fisheries •

In  France  new  pot  fisheries  for  Nephrops,  octopus,  crawfish,  whelk  and  also  for  fish  (dorado  and  conger)  in  coastal  and  continental  slope  waters  are being tried (France: Implications: Development of new fisheries).  

   

160 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 9: Compendium of Mitigation Technologies Mitigation Methods

 

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Gillnets 

porpoises 

Cetaceans 

US, EU,  Mediterranean  Gillnet fisheries 

effective  

Required 

  

Larsen, 1999;  Kraus 1997 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Driftnets 

sea lions 

Pinnipeds 

California  swordfish and  sharks fishery 

Effective 

 Required 

  

Barlow &  Cameron 2003 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Gillnets 

harbour  seals 

Pinnipeds 

Washington  salmon and  sturgeon fishery  

Ineffective 

 Required 

  

Gearin et al., 2000 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Gillnets 

Franciscana  river  dolphin 

Cetaceans 

Argentinian  fishery 

reduced  bycatch but  dinner bell for  sea lions 

  

  

Bordino et al.,  2002 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Bottom  trawl? 

dugongs 

Dugongs 

Australian  fishery 

Inconclusive 

Not  required 

  

Anon., 2003 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Fish traps 

Humpback  whale 

Cetaceans 

Newfoundland  cod and pollack 

Effective 

  

  

Lien et al., 1992 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Gillnets 

Hectorʹs  Dolphin 

Cetaceans 

New Zealand  fishery 

Effective 

  

  

Stone et al., 1997 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers  

Gillnets 

Common  Murre,  Rhinoceros  auklet 

Birds 

Puget sound  salmon, NW US  Pacific 

Not significant 

  

Reduced  bycatch of  Common  Murre, but not  the Rhinoceros  auklet 

Melvin et al., 1999 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

| 161

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers 

Gillnets,  longline 

Bottlenose  Dolphins,  harbour  porpoise 

Cetaceans 

Mediterranean  Sea 

Inconclusive &  inconsistent 

Not  required 

 

 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Modified/Interactive  Pingers 

Pelagic  trawls 

Common  dolphins 

Cetaceans 

IRL, DM, FR  pelagic trawls  bass albacore,  bowriding  

Inconclusive &  Inconsistent  

Not  required 

  

Anon., 2006 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Modified/Interactive  Pingers 

  

Bottlenose  Dolphins 

Cetaceans 

IRL,   Bowriding  experiments 

Effective 

Not  required 

  

Leeney et al., 2007 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Oil Filled tubes 

Purse Seine 

Dolphins 

Cetaceans 

Japanese and  Tunisian  fisheries 

Short term,  followed by  habituation 

  

  

SGFEN, 2001. 

Active  acoustic  devices 

pyrotechnics 

  

killer whales 

Cetaceans 

Alaska Sablefish 

Ineffective 

Illegal 

Also ineffective  for California  Sea Lion 

Dahlheim, 1998 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Transponder signaled  closed cod‐ends 

Trawls 

  

  

  

Operationally  possible, yet to  be tested in sea  trials 

Not  required 

  

Pennec &  Woerther, 1993 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Arc‐discharge  transducer 

Trawls,  Purse  Seines 

fur seals 

Pinnipeds 

South Africa  Hake fishery 

Some effect in  trawls,   Not  effective in P.  seines 

  

  

Shaughnessy et  al., 1981 

Active  acoustic  devices 

AHDs 

Gillnets,  trawls 

harbour seal,  fur seals 

Pinnipeds 

Oregon Salmon  fishery, New  Zealand hoki 

Worked for  porpoises in  Bays in British  Columbia 

Ineffective 

  

Geiger &  Jefferies, 1987;  Stewardson &  Cawthorn, 2004 

 

162 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

 

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Active  acoustic  devices 

Predator sounds  (Killer whales) 

Area tests  

Gray whale  Beluga  whale Dall’s  Porpoise 

Cetaceans 

California Coast,  Alaska, Japan 

  

effective  

  

Cummings &  Thompson 1971;  Fish & Vania  1971; Jefferson  and Curry, 1996 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Predator sounds  (Killer whales) 

Purse  Seine? 

California  Sea Lion 

Pinnipeds 

Washington  

Scordino &  Pfeifer, 1993 

Ineffective 

  

Cummings &  Thompson 1971;  Fish & Vania  1971; Jefferson  and Curry, 1997 

Active  acoustic  devices 

AHDs 

Traps and  gillnets 

Grey Seal 

Pinnepeds 

Baltic Sea 

 

Not  required 

Mixed results.  Testing driven  by increasing  predataion by  seals 

Fjalling et al.,  2006 

Active  acoustic  devices 

Pingers 

Gillnets 

Grey Seal 

Pinnepeds 

Baltic Sea 

 

Ineffective 

Negative  results. Dinner  bell and  increased  predation  observed 

Stridh, 2008 

Alternative  buoy ropes 

Break away lines, light  messenger ropes, glow  ropes, acoustic  triggers 

Traps and  Gillnets 

Northern  Right whales 

Cetaceans 

US and Canada  fisheries 

more data  required 

  

  

Werner et al.,  2006 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

| 163

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Dyed bait (blue) 

Longlines 

albatross  spp 

Birds 

Hawaiian  swordfish/tuna  

Effective 

  

  

McNamara,  1999 ; Boggs, 200;  Gilman et al.,  2003a 

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Dyed bait (blue) 

Longlines 

loggerhead,  leatherback  turtles 

Turtles 

 Costa Rica,  West Atlantic 

Ineffective 

  

  

Swimmer et al.,  2005 ; Watson et  al., 2002 

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Weighted Bait 

Longlines 

albatross  spp 

Birds 

Atlantic  swordfish 

Effective 

  

  

Boggs, 2001  

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Novel Bait switch to  mackerel 

Longlines 

loggerhead,  leatherback  turtles 

Turtles 

Atlantic 

No effect 

  

Noxious bait no  effect on  California Sea  Lion either 

Watson et al.,  2005 

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Streamer Lines &  towed buoys 

longlines 

albatross  other  seabirds 

Birds 

Hawaiian  swordfish,  Norwegian  Longline 

effective 

  

  

Boggs, 2001;  Lokkeborg, 2001;  McNamara et al.,  1999 

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Circle Hooks 

Longlines 

turtles 

Turtles 

Global Longline  fisheries 

effective but  may increase  shark catches 

Required in  some  instances 

Other: Deeper  sets, single bait  hooking,  minimising day  soak time,  

Gilman et al.,  2005 ; Gilman et  al., 2006 ; Watson  et al., 2004  

Bait & Lure  Alterations 

Circle Hooks 

Longlines 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Mediterranean  Sea 

Some success  with circle  hooks 

Not  required 

Experimental  stage 

FTFB, 2008 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Trawls 

turtles,  sharks, rays 

Turtles 

Global Shrimp  fisheries  

extremely  effective 

Required  

  

Clark et al., 1991;  Shiode and Tokai,  2004 

 

164 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

 

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Bottom  trawls 

Turtles,  sharks, rays 

Turtles 

Mediterranean  Sea  

Effective at  reducing turtle  bycatch and  reducing  debris. Losses  of marketable  fish a problem 

Not  required 

Experimental  and needs  further  development 

Sala et al., 2008  (project LIFE 04  NAT/IT/000187)  and E.Taskavak  and S. Atabey  (Turkish study) 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Cameroon 

Not yet  evaluated 

Proposed 

Experimental  but extensive  testing of super  shooter, double  flap cover. 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Nigeria 

 

Required  (Super  shooter,  double flap  cover) US  certified 

Big incentives in  US market  certification;  socio‐economic  effects need to  be studied 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Mexico 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required  (Super  shooter,  double flap  cover) US  certified 

 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Venezuela 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required  (Super  shooter,  double flap  cover and  single cover  net) US  certified 

50% of  commercial  catch is lost  through the use  of TEDs 

Marcano et al.,  1998. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

| 165

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Columbia 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required  (Super  shooter,  double flap  cover) US  certified 

Big incentives in  US market  certification;  socio‐economic  effects need to  be studied; 20– 40% loss of  marketable fish  catch 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDS 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Costa Rica 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required  (Modified  Super  shooter  with a  separation  between  bars of 6  inch, double  flap cover)  US certified 

Big incentives in  US market  certification;  socio‐economic  effects need to  be studied 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp/Fish  Trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Trindad &  Tobago 

 

Not  required 

Extensive  experimentation  with different  designs 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp/Fish  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Bahrain 

 

Not  required 

Extensive  experimentation  with different  designs 

 

 

166 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

 

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp/Fish  Trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Iran 

 

Required  (super  shooter,  double flap  net cover &  AUSTED) 

 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp  trawl 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Indonesia 

 

Required  (super  shooter,  double flap  net cover)  US Certified 

 

 

Exclusion  Devices  

TEDs 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles 

Turtles 

Southeast Asia  (Thailand) 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required  (TTFD); US  certified 

 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtle,  sharks, rays 

Turtles 

Madagascar 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch;  

Required  (Super  shooter,  double flap  cover); US  Certified 

Big incentives  following  certification by  US.  

Report on TED  implementation  to the fishermen’s  association 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp  trawls 

Turtles,  sharks, rays 

Turtles 

French Guyana 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Proposed  (Nordmore  grid, double  flap net  cover) 

 

 

Exclusion  Devices 

TEDs 

Shrimp  Trawls 

Totoaba  mcdonaldi 

Fish 

Upper Gulf of  California  (Mexico) 

Effective in  reducing turtle  bycatch 

Required in  MPA (Fish  eye) 

Bycatch  reduction of  40% 

Managament  plan for fishing  in the Upper Gulf  of Claifornia  (Mexico) 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

| 167

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Exclusion  Devices 

 SEDs 

Pelagic  Trawls 

fur seals, sea  lions 

Pinnipeds 

Australia, NZ,  Tasmaina, squid,  hoki, blue  grenadier  fisheries 

effective, esp.  with top  escape hatch in  large mw  trawls 

Required ? 

  

Gibson and  Isaken, 1998;  Cawthorn &  Starr, in prep;  Anon., 2003.  

Exclusion  Devices 

REDs (Rigid) 

Pelagic  Trawls 

Common  dolphins 

Cetaceans 

UK Bass, French  albacore  fisheries 

inconclusive 

Not  required 

  

Anon., 2006 

Exclusion  Devices 

Net panels 

Pelagic  trawls 

Common  dolphins,  other MF off  Africa 

Cetaceans 

Dutch N. Africa,  UK and FR Bass  fisheries 

Inconclusive,  difficult to  handle, major  loss of target  species 

Not  required 

  

Anon., 2006 

Exclusion  Devices 

Net panels 

Purse Seine 

dolphins 

Cetaceans 

Eastern Tropical  Pacific yellowfin  tuna fishery 

effective 

  

Called the  Medina panel 

Werner et al.,  2006 

Exclusion  Devices 

Turtle chains/modified  dredges 

Scallop  dredge  

turtles  

Turtles 

US scallop  fisheries 

effective 

  

  

Smolowitz, 2006 

Exclusion  Devices 

Trap guards (bungee  cord) 

Traps  (crabs) 

bottlenose  dolphins 

Cetaceans 

Indian River  Lagoon  

effective 

  

  

Noke and Odell,  2002 

Operational  Practices 

Night Sets 

Longlines 

seabirds 

Birds 

Hawaii fishery 

effective 

  

  

McNamara et al.,  1999; Boggs, 2003 

Operational  Practices 

Side Sets 

Longlines 

Albatross  spp 

Birds 

Hawaiian  swordfish/tuna  Western North  Pacific 

effective 

  

  

Gilman et al.,  2003a; Gilman et  al., in press;  Yokota and  Kiyota, 2006 

 

168 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

 

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Operational  Practices 

Underwater Sets  (chutes) 

Longlines 

seabirds 

Birds 

Hawaiian tuna,  Norwegian  Longline 

effective 

  

Increased catch  rate for target  species 

Lokkeborg, 2001;  Gilman et al.,  2003 b 

Operational  Practices 

Underwater Sets  (subsurface) 

Gillnets 

Bottlenose  and Long‐ snouted  spinner 

Cetaceans 

North Australia  multi species 

effective  (reduction  ~50%) 

  

  

Hembree &  Harwood, 1987  

Operational  Practices 

Discarding offal  during shooting 

Longlines 

Albatross  spp 

Birds 

Hawaiian  swordfish/tuna  

effective 

  

Distracted the  birds so  presume was  effective? 

McNamara et al.,  1999 

Operational  Practices 

Time area closures 

Gillnets 

Hectorʹs  Dolphins 

Cetaceans 

New Zealand  fisheries 

highly  effective 

Required 

  

Read et al., 2006 

Operational  Practices 

Decoys (anchored  boats) 

Static Gears 

Grey Seal 

Pinnepeds 

Baltic 

Short term  effects noted 

Not  required 

 

Fishermen’s  Information 

Operational  Practices 

Dropping headline of  pelagic trawls 

Pelagic  Trawls 

Small  cetaceans 

Cetaceans 

NE Atlantic/Bay  of Biscay 

Not assessed 

Voluntary 

Main  motivation is to  target larger  tuna  

NECESSITY  project 

Passive  acoustic  devices 

Reflector devices 

  

small  cetaceans 

Cetaceans 

SA Beach  protection 

effective for  short period 

Not  required 

  

SGFEN, 2001. 

Passive  acoustic  devices 

Reflector devices  (Aquatec) 

Gillnets 

porpoises 

Cetaceans 

EU gillnet and  tangle net  fisheries 

Tested in  Albacore tuna  fishery but  inconclusive  results 

Not  required 

  

  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation Methods

| 169

Specific Device

Fishing Gear

Species

Species Category

Test forum

Performance

Regulatory status

Comments

References

Passive  acoustic  devices 

Reflector devices,  metallic heads,  barriers 

Gillnets,  float lines 

Bottlenose  Dolphins,  porpoises 

Cetaceans 

NZ Gillnets,  Simulated  gilllnets  Scotland, float  lines Canada 

metallic head  ineffective,  Scotch exp.  Effective,  Porpoises  ineffective 

  

  

Hembree &  Harwood, 1987;  Goodson &  Mayo, 1995;  Koschiski &  Culik 1997 

Passive  acoustic  devices 

Reflector nets  barium/iron oxide 

Gillnets 

porpoises 

Cetaceans 

 Bay of  Fundy,Canada  fisheries, North  Sea, 

mixed results,  generally  effective, but  not in UK  North Sea 

Not  required 

Use with  pingers/TADs  recommended,  also effective for  Shearwaters in  Canada 

Koschinski et al.,  2006; Larsen et  al., 2007 ; Trippel  et al., 2003,  Northridge et al.,  2003 

Passive  acoustic  devices 

Echolocation  disruptors 

Gillnets 

bottlenose  dolphins 

Cetaceans 

Mediterranean  fisheries 

promising, but  habituation  may occur 

Not  required 

  

Werner et al.,  2006 

Twine  alterations 

Multi‐monofilament,  Thinner twines 

Gillnets 

porpoises 

Cetaceans 

North Sea and  West of Scotland  fisheries 

multi mono  ineffective     thinner twine  effective for  porpoises and  seals 

  

thinner twine  also effective for  seals 

Northridge et al.,  2003 

Twine  alterations 

White Mesh 

Gillnets 

Common  Mure,  Rhinoceros  auklet 

Birds 

Puget sound  salmon, NW US  Pacific 

Effective 

Some  reductions  in salmon  landings 

Some  reductions in  salmon landings 

Melvin et al., 1999 

 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 171

Annex 10: Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta) bycatch, case study: Mediterranean Sea Alessandro Luchetti and Antonello Sala, ISMAR‐CNR, Ancona, Italy  There are three turtle species in the Mediterranean Sea: the leatherback (Dermochelys  coriacea), the green (Chelonia midas) and the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta).   Loggerhead sea turtles are listed as endangered in the Red List of Threatened Species  of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN;  Hilton‐Taylor, 2000). The Barcelona Convention adopted an Action Plan for the Con‐ servation  of  Mediterranean  Marine  Turtles  in  1989,  acknowledged  that  catches  by  fishermen are the most serious threat to turtles and that their conservation deserved  special  priority  (Tudela,  2000).  In  the  Mediterranean  Sea,  they  represent  the  most  abundant species of marine turtles. Moreover C. caretta is one of the two marine turtle  species  with  nesting  beaches  in  the  Mediterranean  Sea;  Broderick  et  al.  (2002)  esti‐ mated that there are 2.280–2.787 loggerheads nesting annually in the Mediterranean.  Laurent et al. (1992) considered that adult survival as the main factor affecting popu‐ lation growth rates, fecundity being less significant; this emphasizes the importance  of limiting fishing bycatch of these species.  The  knowledge  of  the  biology  of  the  loggerhead  turtle  represents  a  crucial  part  in  evaluating the impact of different fishing activity in different areas. In the Mediterra‐ nean sea it is possible to count ten different countries with nesting beaches (Cyprus,  Egypt,  Greece,  Israel,  Italy,  Lebanon,  the  Libyan  Arab  Jamahiriya,  the  Syrian  Arab  Republic, Turkey and Tunisia), but probably the Eastern Mediterranean sea (Greece  and Turkey) represents the most important area. Furthermore it is possible to define  two main ecological phases in the loggerhead turtle’s life: the pelagic phase and the  demersal phase. The greatest density of specimens in the demersal phase is found in  shallow waters (< 100m). Thus, different types of fishing gear can produce different  capture  and  mortality  rates  and  may  affect  different  ecological  phases  (pelagic  or  demersal; Gerosa and Casale, 1999). In the Mediterranean, interactions of sea turtles  with  fishing gears, including  trawl  nets,  are  still  insufficiently studied  (Casale  et  al.,  2004).  Surface  longline,  driftnet  and  bottom  trawl  boats  operating  in  the  Mediterra‐ nean are the major threats to the survival of this species, even if the impact of fixed  gears (gillnets and trammel nets) needs also to be carefully considered.   Several countries (22 Mediterranean and 15 non‐Mediterranean) fish normally in the  Mediterranean  Sea  and  an  undefined  number  of  small  boats  are  active  in  non‐EU  countries but reported levels are not recorded. Thus the fishing effort in this area is a  key factor in considering turtle bycatch levels.  Caminas  (2004)  reports  a  possible  direct  exploitation  of  loggerhead  turtle  mainly  in  the North Africa countries and an illegal market probably exists in Egypt. Neverthe‐ less the main threat for the conservation of C. caretta population in the Mediterranean  Sea remains bycatch in fishing gears.   Mediterranean fisheries have a huge impact on the turtle stock: more than 60.000 tur‐ tles are estimated to be caught annually as a result of fishing practices, mortality rates  ranging from 10 percent to 50 percent of individuals caught (Lee and Poland, 1998).  Delayed mortality is mostly unknown.   Bottom trawling activity mainly impacts turtles in the demersal phase since they pre‐ fer the shallow waters of the North Adriatic Sea, South Turkey, Tunisia and Egypt. It   

172 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

is  possible  to  estimate  annual  catch  of  over  4.000  specimens  in  the  central‐northern  Adriatic Sea (Casale et al., 2004), 2.500 (Bradai, 1992) to 5500 (Jribi et al., 2004) in the  Gulf of Gabés (Tunisia) and high unreported catches in Turkey and Egypt (Laurent et  al., 1996). The main factors affecting the bycatch of loggerhead turtle are:  •

the fishing area: mainly in shallow waters;  



the period of the year: most of catches are obtained in winter (Casale et al.,  2004), during the demersal phase (foraging areas); and 



the  haul  duration  which  affects  the  physical  condition  of  the  turtle.  Indi‐ viduals  have  been  observed  in  a  comatose  state  and  other  non‐healthy  specimens  (dead  or  injured)  observed  due  to  long  haul  durations  in  bot‐ tom trawl fisheries (Casale et al., 2004; Casale et al., 2007). 

The  surface  longline  gear deployed  over  the  continental  shelf  (for  tuna‐like  species)  or  offshore  waters  (for  swordfish,  albacore  and  bluefin  tuna)  is  considered  as  the  main threat to marine turtles in the Mediterranean (Margaritoulis et al., 2003). Panou  et al. (1992) estimated an annual catch of about 35.000 specimens alone for the west‐ ern and central Mediterranean Sea.  Some studies investigating the Spanish longline fleet targeting swordfish in the South  Western  Mediterranean  (up  to  60–80  vessels  in  the  summer  months,  in  the  early  1990s)  suggested  that  turtle  bycatches  in  this  region  are  very  high  (Aguilar  et  al.,  1995). From 22.000 to 35.000 individuals per year were estimated to be caught in the  period 1990–91. Bycatch by the foreign industrial longline fleets operating in the area  (Japanese, flag of convenience) could have led to even higher figures. Data on annual  catches are also available for other countries (Italy, Morocco, Tunisia, Malta, Algeria,  and Greece) but in some cases there is a concern over the validity of the data. More‐ over no data are collected in some countries at all.   The  main  problems  with  longline  fisheries  are  that  20–30%  of  the  turtles  caught  by  longline gear may die (Aguilar et al., 1993). 80% of turtles hooked are released alive  but with the hook still inside the mouth, pharynx or oesophagus (Camiñas and Valei‐ ras,  2000),  and  the  eventual  delayed  mortality  is  unknown  although  expect  to  be  high.  Fishermen  agree  on  the  important  economic  losses  due  to  turtle  interactions  with  longlines. Loss of hooks, bait, branch lines and other components of the gear are an  economic problem that fishermen want to solve. The capture of sea turtles also pro‐ duces a decrease in the fishing effort and yields, as a consequence, of the reduction in  the number of hooks and the time necessary to repair or replace gear.  Concerning  other  fishing  gears,  few  official  and  published  data  are  available.  For  drift  nets  bycatch  was  estimated  by  Italian  drift  nets  in  Ionian  Sea  at  around  16.000/year;  (De  Metrio  and  Megalofonou,  1988).  Illegal  drift  nets  are  still  widely  used  in  many  countries,  and  the  amount  of  bycatch  is  estimated  to  be  very  high.  Moreover several driftnet vessels from EU countries were sold to non‐EU countries,  mainly  Moroccan  fleets,  shifting  the  bycatch  problems  from  the  north  to  the  south  basins.   Turtle captures seem to be also high in passive gears, such as fixed nets; gillnets and  trammel nets. Captures by these gears cause direct mortality since turtles get caught  in  them  when  trying  to  feed  and  are  entrapped  and  drown.  Fixed  nets  represent  a  threat for sea turtles mainly in coastal areas (Lazar et al., 2004a), however, quantifica‐ tion of turtle captures in these widely spread fisheries is very difficult to assess and  juveniles  are  frequently  caught  nearby  nesting  areas  in  Greece,  Turkey  and  Cyprus   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 173

(Godley et al., 1998; Suggett and Houghton, 1998). Fixed nets probably are responsi‐ ble for high mortality rates. Delaugerre (1987) reported a mortality rate of 94.4% for  C. caretta specimens caught in Corsica by trammel nets placed at depths of more than  60 m. Argano et al., 1992 found that the mortality rate for specimens tagged and then  recaptured  by  set  gill  nets  in  different  countries  was  73.7%.  Lazar  et  al.,  (2004b)  re‐ corded a high mortality rate (62.5%) for turtles captured in gill nets in Adriatic. Thus  in the Mediterranean the interaction of sea turtles with the static net fishery could be  very important and comparable to other fisheries (Casale et al., 2005).   Purse seines seem to represent a minor problem for turtles since the annual catches  are probably very low and any turtles caught are released alive, but further investiga‐ tion are required to verify this assumptions  Different approaches should be taken into account in reducing the bycatch of logger‐ head turtle including:  •

gear modifications; 



effort reductions; 



time closures;  



 protected areas and sanctuaries (i.e. in nesting areas); 



changes in fishing tactics (i.e. reduction of haul duration can reduce direct  mortality; set longline in depth etc.); and 



better cooperation and education of fishermen (i.e. keeping the turtles on‐ board and allowing them to recover before releasing them or removing the  hooks from turtle’s mouth etc.) 

Concerning gear modifications in bottom trawls, very few studies have been carried  out in the Mediterranean Sea. Sala et al. (unpublished results, ongoing project LIFE 04  NAT/IT/000187) developed and tested at sea four different types of TEDs (Turtle Ex‐ cluder devices). The main goal of these tests were to implement the TEDs in order to  show that they can be used with minimal losses of target species while also providing  benefits  to  fishermen  in  terms  of  reduced  sorting  time.  The  first  attempts  were  not  satisfactory  because  the  debris  (mainly  stones)  caused  damage  to  the  grid  or  the  commercial losses were too high. Other grid designs were tested and step by step the  performances of TEDs were improved. A flexible but resistant TED made of steel and  rubber showed a good effectiveness in reducing bycatch, and debris, and turtles, with  no commercial losses, and this seemed to be a good solution. Finally a Supershooter  TED was tested and very good results were obtained in reducing discards and in re‐ leasing  turtles,  even  if  the  setting  the  angle  of  the  grid  was  difficult.  Atabey  and  Taskavak (2001) tested the Supershooter TED in the shrimp fishery off Turkey. They  obtained very good results because both C. caretta and Chelonia mydas were excluded  by  the  modified  Supershooter,  and  unwanted  incidental  catches,  such  as  jellyfish,  sharks, and rays could also be excluded. They also found that most turtle catches oc‐ curs at the depths between 11 and 30 meters and that the proportion of dead and co‐ matose  turtles  resulting  from  trawls  increased  with  towing  time.  The  final  recommendation of the authors was that modified Supershooter TEDs could greatly  assist fishermen in reducing catches of turtles and unwanted bycatch without losing  valuable prawns or fish.  Considering longlines the main factors affecting sea turtle bycatch are:  •

number of hooks;  



hook size and shape: J shape and circle shape;   

174 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



hook material: some observations seem to point to a rapid degradation (2– 3  months)  of  non‐stainless  hooks  in  the  mouth  of  the  turtles  released  (Panou et al., 1999);  



bait type: catch rates of loggerhead turtles are higher with squid baits than  with fish baits, use of lightsticks; 



bait colour: differences between blue‐dyed baits and non‐dyed baits; 



fishing depth: depth at which the branch line is positioned; 



location  of  fishing  grounds  in  relation  to  the  topographic  and  oceano‐ graphic features, sea temperature; and 



total catch: higher catches sink the gear and increase turtle mortality. 

One of the most important mitigation measures tested in the southern Italian longline  fisheries  is  the  change  in  hook  shape  (project  Life  Nature  2003  –  NAT/IT/000163).  Some  studies  have  tested  the  effectiveness  of  circle  hooks  in  comparison  to  J  shape  hooks and found that no significant differences in catch efficiency on the target spe‐ cies  (swordfish)  was  observed;  turtle  bycatch  was  observed  only  in  J  shape  hooks;  and  also  the  circle  hook  showed  good  efficiency  in  avoiding  the  bycatch  of  pelagic  stingray  Dasyatis  violacea.  Tests  carried  out  in  the  Strait  of  Sicily  seemed  to  confirm  these results: 82% of turtle were caught with J shape hooks, while only 18% with cir‐ cle  hooks.  Furthermore  88.2%  of  the  turtles  were  caught  in  the  mouth,  while  11.8%  swallowed  the  hooks:  all  swallowed  hooks  were  J  type.  Finally  also  in  this  case  no  differences were found in the number and total weight of target swordfish captured.  The influence of different bait types in the bycatch of loggerhead turtle was also in‐ vestigated. In the Western Mediterranean sea some authors found that the combina‐ tion  of  hook  and  bait  type  resulted  in  the  lowest  bycatch  of  turtles  and  the  highest  catches  of  swordfish  was  with  J  hooks  with  mackerel  bait  (project  FISH/2005/28A,  2008). In the Alboran Sea some authors found that the use of mackerel bait can effec‐ tively reduce incidental capture of loggerhead sea turtles compared to squid bait. A  total  of  38  loggerhead  turtles  were  caught,  27 (71%)  were  caught  on  squid  while 11  (29%)  on  mackerel  bait.  Also  in  this  case  there  were  no  significant  differences  be‐ tween the numbers of individuals or weight of target species (swordfish) between the  2 bait types.   In  the  Ionian  Sea  “size  of  hook”  was  studied  (Deflorio  et  al.,  2005).  The  main  result  was that the smaller hooks used for albacore tuna fishing are more likely to catch tur‐ tles as they are easier for the turtles to feed on them.  Acoustic  deterrent  experiments  were  carried  out  on  4  juveniles  and  7  sub‐adults  of  loggerhead turtles in open tanks at the Cattolica (Italy) “Delphynursery”. At frequen‐ cies  between  50  and  400  Hz,  some  avoidance  behaviour  was  observed  with  the  maximum level of avoidance at (20%) 50Hz. A “neutral” behaviour (turtles reacting  to the sound but not moving towards or away from its source) was observed between  50 and 700 Hz with highest levels (40%) between 50 and 100 Hz. The most frequent  behaviour at all frequencies was “no response” and at frequencies above 700 Hz, no  response was observed in any of the tests. This results, even if based on a small sam‐ ple, together with the increased level of acoustic pollution in the Mediterranean did  not lead to further experiments.   The effect of bait colours (yellow, red and blue) and bait odour was tested with ex‐ periments carried out with 27 loggerheads (22 immature and 5 adults) in open tanks.  Juveniles reacted to baits colour differently compared to sub‐adults and furthermore,  sub‐adults showed distinctive individual differences in behaviour. As the reaction to   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 175

different colours depended strongly on individual age as well as other factors, such  as smell, it was concluded it was not worthwhile to continue with these tests. More‐ over,  it  is  very  difficult  to  see  how  this  solution  could  be  adopted  as  a  mitigation  measure, also because of problems associated with absorbance of colours with depth.  These experiments were conducted within the confines of shallow pools where there  was very little light attenuation.   Some  studies  were  performed  to  evaluate  the  effect  on  sea  turtle  bycatch  with  the  setting  depth  of  longlines.  Increasing  the  set  depth  for  longlines  has  been  found  to  reduce the overall catch rates of turtles. In the Ionian Sea preliminary results (project  Life Nature 2003 – NAT/IT/000163) seemed to indicate that most sea‐turtle bycatches  happened when hooks were set at between 10 and 15 m deep, however, more data is  needed  to  confirm  whether  this  is  a  significant  result.  Other  studies  (Laurent  et  al.,  2001) showed that the maximum depth at which the marine turtles were caught was  60  m  for  swordfish  longline  and  20  m  for  albacore  longline.  There  are  concerns  though that the deeper setting of longlines may result in an increase in mortality rate  of turtles that are hooked and die through drowning.  The final consideration on mitigation measure can be summarised as follows:  TEDs:

TEDs represent a good solution in bottom trawls provided they are set optimally for  the trawls used. This has proved very difficult in Mediterranean Sea where even very  small  species  are  marketable.  Reduction  of  haul  duration  may  also  be  an  effective  operational measure for reducing direct mortality and occurrence of injuries as well  as weak and comatosed individuals  Circle hooks:

With circle hooks the following has been concluded:   •

circle hooks show good efficiency in reducing bycatch of turtles and throat  hooking  but  some  differences  in  fishermen’s  attitude  to  them  were  ob‐ served:  circle  hooks  are  not  accepted  by  Spanish  fishermen  (Baez  et  al.,  2006) as their use is considered to diminish yields of target species (Gilman  et al., 2006). On the contrary Italian fishermen did not find any appreciable  difference (project life nature 2003 ‐ NAT/IT/000163). 



Circle hooks seem to shift the bycatch problem from turtle to cetacean and  shark (Caminas and Valerias, 2001). 



Casale (2005) reviewed the available data presented by Watson et al. (2003,  2004);  the  conclusion  was  that  the  overall  effect  of  the  circle  hooks  in  re‐ ducing bycatch is largely limited to the soft‐shelled leatherback turtle. 



Studies  with  loggerhead  turtle  carried  out  by  NOAA  in  the  Atlantic  strongly  suggest  that  catch  rate  of  these  species  is  affected  more  by  hook  size and bait and not so much by hook shape. 



When considering hook design as a mitigation measure one should keep in  mind the effects on catch rates for target species (fish) and bycatch of fish.  The  SGRST/SGFEN  05–01  (2005)  evidenced  that,  in  a  given  fishery  and  area,  circle  hooks  (compared  to  J‐shaped  hooks):  decreased  the  catch  of  swordfish; increased the catch of bigeye tuna and bluefin tuna; and did not  affect the catch of blue sharks (research in Azores found that there was an  increase in blue shark catches; Bolten and Bjorndal, 2003)  

 

176 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



In  a  recent  review  on  the  efficacy  of  circle  hooks  in  reducing  sea  turtle  mortality  Read  (2007)  concluded  that  “circle  hooks  have  the  potential  to  reduce  the  mortality  of  sea  turtles  captured  in  many  (but  not  all)  pelagic  longline fisheries, but that they should be field tested in a rigorous experi‐ ment before they are required in any fishery” 



Efficiency  of  hook  shape  seems  to  vary  depending  on  target  species  and  fishing areas, thus according to the results reported for this specific fishery,  the consequences of the hook type to target species and the other sea tur‐ tles should be considered before introduction of mitigation measures. 

Acoustic deterrent:

Results  did  not  encourage  continuation  of  this  type  of  experiments  for  sea  turtles  catch mitigation (SGRST/SGFEN 05–01)  Dyeing bait:

Although  effective  in  laboratory  experiments  with  captive  turtles,  dyeing  bait  does  not  appear  to  have  potential  as  an  effective  mitigation  measure  to  reduce  sea  turtle  bycatch in longline fisheries (Swimmer et al., 2005).  Type of bait:

The use of mackerel bait can effectively reduce incidental capture of loggerhead sea  turtles as compared to squid bait and no significant differences were observed with  target  species  catch.  Lightsticks  used  in  swordfish  fisheries  were  found  to  strongly  attract turtles.   Tank test:

The importance of physical factors (light penetration and colour absorbance, currents,  oceanographic factors, etc.) of at‐sea conditions should be taken into consideration in  analysing the results from experiments on captive animals, particularly with respect  to colour and odour, but also the isolation of a single turtle in a captive environment  is  another  important  factor  as  it  may  affect  behaviour.  Tank  tests  results  should  be  considered with caution.  Bait size:

It is another important factor to be taken into account, but reliable information is not  available to assess whether this is significant or not is not available.  Set depth:

Increasing the set depth for longlines has been found to reduce the overall catch rates  of turtles but has led to increased mortality of turtles that are still hooked and subse‐ quently die through drowning. Swordfish longlines catch turtles at a depth between 0  to 60m; albacore longline catch turtles between 0 and 20m  Set nets:

Mainly in Turkey and Greece, avoiding areas known to have high turtles abundance,  which might occur seasonally (i.e. after nesting) could be a good avoidance practice.  Using  gillnets  instead  of  trammel  net  could  also  reduce  entanglement  of  turtles.  In  the Mediterranean the interaction and bycatch of sea turtles with the static net fishery  could be very important and comparable to other fisheries (Casale et al., 2005). 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 177

Fishermen cooperation :

Comatose specimens can survive or die, depending on the circumstances. If released  immediately these turtles would probably die, because they cannot swim to the sur‐ face to breathe. Fishermen can substantially reduce this problem by keeping the tur‐ tles  onboard  and  allowing  them  to  recover  before  releasing  them.  Fishermen  cooperation  and  education  is  also  essential  in  removing  the  hooks  from  the  turtle’s  mouth.  References Aguilar, R., Más, J., Pastor, X. 1993. Las tortugas marinas y la pesca con palangre de superficie  en el Mediterráneo. Greenpeace. Proyecto internacional.   Aguilar, R., Mas, J. Pastor, X. 1995. Impact of Spanish swordfish long‐line fisheries on the log‐ gerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta population in the western Mediterranean. In J.I. Richard‐ son  &  T.H.  Richardson,  eds.  Proc.  12th  Annual  Workshop  on  Sea  Turtles  Biology  and  Conservation, pp. 1–6. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐ 361.  Argano,  R.,  Basso,  R.,  Cocco,  M.,  Gerosa,  G.  1992.  New  data  on  loggerhead  (Caretta  caretta)  movements within Mediterranean. Boll. Mus. Ist. Biol. Univ. Genova, 56–57:137–163.  Atabey, S., Taskavak E., 2001. A preliminary study on the prawn trawls excluding sea turtles.  Urun. Derg./J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. Vol. 18, no. 1–2, pp. 71–79. 2001.  Báez, J.C., Camiñas, J.A., Rueda, L. 2006. Accidental fishing capture of marine turtles in South  Spain. Mar Turtle Newsletter, 111:11–12  Bolten, A.B., Bjorndal, K.A., 2003. Experiment to evaluate gear modification on rates of sea tur‐ tle bycatch in the swordfish longline fishery in the Azores – Phase 2. Final Project Report.  NOAA Award Number NA16FM1378. ACCSTR. 19 pp.  Bradai,  M.N.  1992.  Les  captures  accidentelles  de  Caretta  caretta  au  chalut  benthique  dans  le  Golfe de Gabés. Rapp. Comm. int. Mer Médit. 33: 285.  Broderick,  A.C.,  Glen,  F.,  Godley,  B.J.,  Hays,  G.C.  2002.  Estimating  the  number  of  green  and  loggerhead turtles nesting annually in the Mediterranean. Oryx, 36(3): 227–236.  Caminas, J.A. 2004. Sea turtles of the Mediterranean Sea: population dynamics, sources of mor‐ tality and relative importance of fisheries impacts. FAO Fisheries Report 738: 27–84.  Camiñas,  J.A., Valeiras,  J.  2001.  Marine  turtles,  mammals  and  sea  birds  captured  incidentally  by the Spanish surface longline fisheries in the Mediterranean Sea. Rapp. Comm. Int. Mer  Medit., 36: 248.  Casale, P. 2005. Holes in the circle. A critical review of circle hooks as a measure for reducing  the  impact  of  longline  fishery  on  sea  turtles.  Report  June  2005.  (Unpublished  report  to  WWF).  Casale,  P., Laurent  L.,  De  Metrio,  G.,  2004.  Incidental  capture  of  marine  turtles  by  the  Italian  trawl fishery in the north Adriatic Sea. Biological Conservation 119: 287–295.  Casale, P., Freggi, D., Basso, R., Argano, R. 2005. Interaction of the static net fishery with log‐ gerhead  sea  turtles  in  the  Mediterranean:  insights  from  mark‐recapture  data.  Short  note,  Herpetological Journal, 15: 201–203.  Casale, P., Catturino, L., Freggi, D., Rocco, M., Argano, R. 2007. Incidental catch of marine tur‐ tles by Italian trawlers and longliners in the central Mediterranean. Aquatic Conserv: Mar.  Freshw.  Ecosyst.  Published  online  in  Wiley  InterScience.  (www.interscience.wiley.com)  DOI: 10.1002/aqc.841.  Deflorio, M., Aprea, A., Corriero, A., Santamaria, N., De Metrio, G. 2005. Incidental captures of  sea  turtles  by  swordfish  and  albacore  longlines  in  the  Ionian  Sea.  Fisheries  science,  71:  1010–1018. 

 

178 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Delaugerre, M. 1987. Statut des tortues marines de la Corse (et de la Mediterranee). Vie Milieu  37(3–4): 243–264.  De Metrio, G., Megalofonou, P. 1988. Mortality of marine turtles (Caretta caretta L. and Dermo‐ chelys  coriacea  L.)  consequent  to  accidental  capture  in  the  Gulf  of  Taranto.  Rapp.  Comm.  int. Mer Médit. 31(2): 285.  FISH/2005/28A  ‐  Service  Contract  SI2.439703.  2008.  Field  study  to  assess  some  mitigation  measures to reduce bycatch of marine turtles in surface longline fisheries. Final report. 215  pp.   Gerosa, G., Casale, P. 1999 Interaction of Marine Turtles with Fisheries in the Mediterranean.  Mediterranean  Action  Plan  –  UNEP  Regional  Activity  Centre  for  Specially  Protected Ar‐ eas.  Gilman, E., Zollet, E., Beverly, S., Nakano, H., Davis, K., Shiode, D., Dalzell, P., Kinan, I. 2006.  Reducing sea turtle bycatch in pelagic longline fisheries. Fish, 7: 2–23.  Godley,  B.J.,  Gucu,  A.C.,  Broderick,  A.C.,  Furness,  R.W.,  Solomon,  S.E.  1998.  Interaction  be‐ tween marine turtles and artisanal fisheries in the eastern Mediterranean: a probable cause  for concern? Zool. Middle East, 16: 49–64.  Jribi,  I.,  Bradai,  M.N.,  Bouain,  A.  2004.  Étude  de  lʹInteraction  Tortue  Marine  Caretta  Caretta‐ Chalut Bentique dans le Golfe de Gabès (Tunisie). Rapp. Comm. Int. Mer. Médit: 37: 528.  Hilton‐Taylor,  C.  (compiler).  2000.  2000  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species.  IUCN,  Gland,  Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.  Laurent, L., Clobert, J., Lescure, J. 1992. The demographic modelling of the Mediterranean log‐ gerhead sea turtle population: first results. Rapp. Comm. int. Mer Médit. 33:300.  Laurent,  L.,  Abd  El‐Mawla,  E.M.,  Bradai,  M.N.,  Demirayak,  F.,  Oruc,  A.  1996.  Reducing  sea  turtle  mortality  induced  by  Mediterranean  fisheries:  trawling  activity  in  Egypt,  Tunisia  and Turkey. Report for the WWF International Mediterranean Programme. WWF Project  9E0103. 32pp.  Laurent, L., Caminas, J.A., Casale, P., Deflorio, M., De Metrio, G., Kapantagakis, A., Margari‐ toulis,  D.,  Politou,  C.Y.,  Valeiras,  J.  2001.  Assessing  marine  turtle  bycatch  in  European  drifting  longline  and  trawl  fisheries  for  identifying  fishing  regulations.  Project‐EC‐DG  Fisheries  98–008.  Joint  project  of  BIOINSIGHT,  IEO,  IMBC,  STPS  and  University  of  Bari.  Villeurbanne,  France.  Available  at  http://www.seaturtle.org/documents/EMTP‐FINAL‐ REPORT.pdf.   Lazar,  B.,  Margaritoulis,  D.,  Tvrtkovic,  N.  2004a.  Tag  recoveries  of  the  loggerhead  sea  turtle  Caretta caretta in the eastern Adriatic Sea: implications for conservation. Journal of the Ma‐ rine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 84: 475–80.   Lazar, B., Margaritoulis, D., Tvrtkovic, N. 2004b.  Lee,  H.A.,  Poland,  G.C.R.  1998.  Threats  by  fishing.  Euro  turtle  (available  at  www.Ex.ac.uk/telematics/Euroturtle).   Margaritoulis, D., Argano, R., Baran, I., Bentivegna, F., Bradai, M.N., Camiñas, J.A., Casale, P.,  De Metrio, G., Demetropoulos, A., Gerosa, G., Godley, B., Houghton, J., Laurent, L., Lazar,  Y.B. 2003. Loggerhead turtles in the Mediterranean: Present knowledge and conservation  perspectives. In: A.B. Bolten and B.E. Witherington, Eds. Ecology and conservation of log‐ gerhead sea turtles. Washington, DC, Smithsonian Institution Press.  Panou,  A.,  Antypas,  G.,  Giannopoulos,  Y.,  Moschonas,  S.,  Mourelatos,  D.G.  Mourelatos,  Ch.,  Toumazatos, P., Tselentis, L., Voutsinas, N., Voutsinas, V. 1992. Incidental catches of log‐ gerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, in swordfish longlines in the Ionian Sea, Greece. Testudo,  3(4): 46–57. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 179

Panou, A., Tselentis, L., Voutsinas, N., Mourelatus, Ch., Kaloupi, S., Voutsinas, V. Moschonas,  S.  1999.  Incidental  catches  of  marine  turtles  in  surface  longline  fishery  in  the  Ionian  Sea  (Greece). Contrib. Zoogeography and Ecol. Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1: 435–445.  Read, A.J. 2007. Do circle hooks reduce the mortality of sea turtles in pelagic longlines? A re‐ view of recent experiments. Biological Conservation, 135: 155–169.  SGRST/SGFEN 05–01. 2005. Drifting longline fisheries and their turtle bycatches: biological and  ecological issues, overview of the problems and mitigation approaches. Report of the first  meeting of the subgroup on bycatches of turtles in the EU longline fisheries. Brussels, 4–8  July 2005.  Suggett, D.J., and Houghton, J.D.R. 1998. Possible link between sea turtle bycatch and flipper  tagging in Greece. Mar. Turtle Newsletter, 81: 10–11.  Swimmer,  Y.,  Arauz,  R.,  Higgins,  B.,  McNaughton,  L.,  McCracken,  M.,  Ballestero,  J.,  Brill,  R.  2005. Food color and marine turtle feeding behaviour: Can blue bait reduce turtle bycatch  in commercial fisheries? Mar Ecol Prog Ser, 295: 273–278.  Tudela,  S.  2000.  Ecosystem  effects  of  fishing  in  the  Mediterranean:  An  analysis  of  the  major  threats of fishing gear and practices to biodiversity and marine habitats. FAO project for  the preparation of a Strategic Action Plan for the conservation of biological diversity (SAP  BIO) in the Mediterranean Region. Rome. 45 pp.  Watson,  J.W.,  Foster,  D.G.,  Epperly,  S.,  Shah,  A.  2004.  Experiments  in  the  western  Atlantic  Northeast Distant Waters to evaluate sea turtle mitigation measures in the pelagic longline  fishery. Report on experiments conducted in 2001–2003. February 4, 2004.   Watson, J.W., Hataway, B.D., Bergmann, C.E. 2003. Effect of hook size on ingestion of hooks by  loggerhead sea turtles. Report of NOAA National Maritime Fisheries Service, Pascagoula,  Miss., USA. 

 

 

180 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Annex 11: WGECO request as part of the OSPAR QSR 2010 Introduction With increasing public and political concerns on marine fisheries and environmental  issues,  fisheries  science  and  management  has  become  increasingly  complex.  The  move to the ecosystem based approach to Fisheries Management has gained momen‐ tum as the multiple uses of marine resources have broadened to take account of eco‐ system  considerations  and  the  recommendations  from  the  numerous  international  agreements, conferences and summits held on the subject. Some of the most impor‐ tant of these include: •

The 1972 World Conference on Human Environment.  



The 1982 United Nations Law of the Sea Convention.  



The  1992  United  Nations  Conference  on  Environment  and  Development  and its Agenda 21. 



The 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity. 



The 1992 Habitats Directive 



The 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement. 



The 1995 FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.  



The 2001 Reykjavik Declaration. 



The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development. 



The 2002 Green Paper of the European Commission 



UN 2006 General Assembly to ensure protection of vulnerable marine eco‐ systems 



The  2007  Committee  on  Fisheries  of  the  UN  FAO  on  IUU  and  protecting  the marine environment 



The 2007 Integrated Maritime Policy for the European Union 

ICES is in the process of restructuring its Science and Advisory processes and is col‐ laborating  with  HELCOM  and  OSPAR,  among  others,  in  the  evolution  of  a  holistic  ecosystem‐based approach to fisheries management. WGFTFB have been discussing  the subject of fishing impacts for a number of years and has addressed it as a specific  ToR in 2004 (ICES, 2004). Much of this though has been in isolation with limited dia‐ logue between other EG’s including WGECO. WGFTFB has recognised this and has  discussed internally  the  need  to  define  its new  research  direction,  beyond  the  tradi‐ tional focus of bycatch reduction, into developing environmentally responsible fish‐ eries  (ERF)  in  support  of  the  ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries  management.  The  stimulus  for  these  discussions  were  prompted  by  the  ever  increasing  ʹinternational  calls for ban on bottom trawling on high seas’ and also debate at the ʹ2006 ICES Sym‐ posium on Fishing Technology in the 21st Century: Integrating Fishing and Ecosys‐ tem  Conservationʹ  held  in  Boston  (Glass  et  al.,  2007).  Since  WGFTFB  works  closely  with  and  has  industry  people  as  part  of  their  membership  it  felt  that  it  should  be  more proactive in the issue of ERF.   Recognizing this at last year’s meeting in Dublin (ICES, 2007) an ad hoc group made  a first attempt to address this and explore ways of enhancing links with other ICES  WG’s. WGFTFB also addressed a joint ToR with WGECO on the impacts of Crangon  beam trawl fisheries in the North Sea in 2007. Later in 2007 at the ICES ASC in Hel‐ sinki a ToR was formulated between the Chairs of WGFTFB and WGECO as follows: 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 181

“For each OSPAR region, select and succinctly describe one or more representative  examples of gear modifications, which have resulted in changes to the ecosystem ef‐ fects of these gears, including if possible a range of ecosystem components.”  The work contributes to WGECO ToR b) which will pull together an environmental  assessment  of  the  impact  of  fisheries,  in  preparation  for  the  OSPAR  QSR.  It  is  also  seen as means to begin the wider debate on how to properly assess the effect and im‐ pact  of  gear  based  measures  through  the  development  of  a  proper  assessment  framework. This will be worked on at WGECO in 2009.  The  representative  case  studies  identified  by  WGFTFB  to  illustrate  the  positive  and  negative  impacts  of  different  gear  based  technical  measures  are  presented  in  Table  20–1 below.  Table  20‐1. Case studies, identified for the description of representative examples of gear modifi‐ cations that are designed and selected for the mitigations of ecosystem effects.  Case study

Fishing gear

Target species

OSPAR-region

Ecosystem component

1 (IRL) 

Gill net 

Mixed demersal 

OSPAR‐Region II,  III & IV 

Marine mammals 

2 (Eng) 

Demersal otter  trawl 

Norway lobster  (Nephrops  norvegicus) 

OSPAR‐region II 

Fish species 

3 (B, NL,  UK) 

Flatfish beam  trawl 

Mixed, demersal  fish species, mainly  sole (Solea solea)  and plaice  (Pleuronectes  platessa) 

OSPAR‐regions II,  III, IV 

Fish species  Benthic invertebrate  species 

4 (B, DK, F,  GER, NL,  UK) 

Shrimp beam  trawl 

Brown shrimp  (Crangon crangon.) 

OSPAR‐region II 

Mainly commercial  fish species 

5 (Faroe  islands) 

Pelagic otter  trawl 

Blue whiting  (Micromesistius  poutassou) 

OSPAR‐region I &  V 

Fish species 

The case studies are written in the following format.   i )

Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation.  

ii )

The drivers that initiated gear measures being developed or introduced. 

iii )

A description of what was done in terms of mitigation measures.  

iv )

A  description  of  what  management  measures  were  taken  after  the  re‐ search i.e. was the mitigation measure introduced into regulation or was  it only tested and then used or not used voluntarily 

v )

A  description  of  how  the  impacts  of  the  gear  modifications  have  been  assessed. 

vi )

A description of how successful this has been in terms of reducing im‐ pacts. 

 

182 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

References Glass, C. W., Walsh, S.J., Marlen, B., van, (Conveners). 2007. Fishing technology in the 21st cen‐ tury:  integrating  fishing  and  ecosystem  conservation  ICES  Journal  of  Marine  Science.  64(8):1499–1502.  ICES. 2007. Report of the ICES‐FAO Working Group on Fish Technology and Fish Behaviour  (WGFTFB), 23–27 April 2007, Dublin, Ireland. ICES CM 2007/FTC:06. 197 pp.   ICES. 2004. Report of the ICES‐FAO Working Group on Fish Technology and Fish Behaviour  (WGFTFB), 20–23 April 2004, Gdynia, Poland. ICES CM 2004/B: 05:Ref. ACE. 189 pp.  

Case study 1 – introduction of Acoustic Deterrent Devices to reduce Cetacean bycatch in Gillnet Fisheries Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation

The bycatch of marine mammals in European waters is not a new phenomenon, with  records  of  incidental  cetacean  mortality  in  driftnets  dating  back  to  the  time  of  the  Roman  Empire  (Caddell,  2005).I  more  recent  times,  since  the  inception  of  the  CFP  according to scientific advice, most fishing gears commonly used in European fisher‐ ies have been linked with some small cetacean (dolphin and porpoise) bycatch with  the most serious problems reported from static net fisheries. However, despite fears  within the scientific community over these large numbers of cetaceans being taken as  bycatch in European fisheries, any semblance of a coordinated policy to mitigate by‐ catch  was  only  established  with  the  adoption  of  the  Habitats  Directive  in  1992.  Al‐ though  expressed  in  rather  broad  terms,  Article  12.4  of  the  directive  did  establish  a  clear  mandate  for  Member  States  to  address  incidental  catches  of  protected  species  within areas under their jurisdiction but implementation has generally been insuffi‐ cient  and  uneven  across  Member  States.  Concerns  at  the  level  of  cetacean  bycatch,  therefore, have remained and highlighted by a number of EU funded studies, e.g. by  Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) and Trengenza et al. (1997) which have demon‐ strated the scale of the problem in certain fisheries.   As  a  result  of  these  continuing  concerns, the  European  Commission  asked  ICES  in  2001 to provide advice on the fisheries concerned, the risk posed by these fisheries to  identified populations and possible remedial action. It also asked the Scientific, Tech‐ nical,  and  Economic  Committee  on  Fisheries  (STECF)  to  review  this  advice  and  to  provide possible management advice. Following this review, in April 2004, EU legis‐ lation  was  adopted  to  promote  bycatch  mitigation,  in  the  form  of  a  regulation  that  sought  to  address  the  specific  issue  of  incidental  cetacean  mortality  in  Community  waters.  This  case  study  describes  the  introduction  of  this  legislation  and  its  subse‐ quent impact on cetacean bycatch rates.   Drivers that initiated gear measures being introduced

Although not exclusive to European Community fisheries by any means, the inciden‐ tal mortality of significant numbers of charismatic and photogenic marine mammals  and  turtles  has  catalyzed  the  introduction  of  the  measures  to  mitigate  bycatch  at  global,  regional,  and  national  levels.  It  is  fair  to  say  that  the  management  goals  in  most  cases  in  introducing  these  measures  were  driven  strongly  by  societal  values  rather  than  scientific  ones.  Administrations  have  come  came  under  increasing  pres‐ sure  from  NGO’s  and  the  general  public  to  act  on  this  issue  and  ultimately  forced  managers, including the EU to bring in legislation, even though there was an obvious  knowledge  deficient  in  terms  of  actual  level  of  bycatch  in  different  fisheries  and  in  the development of suitable mitigation measures.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 183

It should be noted though that as identified by Werner et al. (2006), marine mammal  bycatch  reduction  is  a  very  active  area  of  research  with  numerous  ongoing  studies  and the frequent development and testing of novel initiatives and mitigation devices.  This  research  in  many  cases  has  been  driven  by  genuine  concerns  among  fisheries  managers,  researchers and  fishermen  to  protect  endangered  species,  while  some  re‐ search has been motivated by the need to reduce gear damage caused by interactions  with marine megafauna or reducing predation of target catch by these species.  Mitigation measures or gear changes tested

In considering the issue of cetacean bycatch in gillnet fisheries, many researchers in  EU  countries  with  perceived  bycatch  problems  saw  acoustic  devices  as  a  potential  solution.  Such  acoustic  deterrents  or  ‘pingers’  are  small  self‐contained  battery  oper‐ ated devices that emit regular or randomised acoustic signals, at a range of frequen‐ cies, and typically loud enough to alert or deter animals from the immediate vicinity  of  fishing  gear.  Active  pingers  were  first  tested  in  Canada,  primarily  as  a  means  to  reduce entrapment of baleen whales in coastal set nets and fish traps. These first de‐ vices, operated at 2.5 kHz, were subsequently tested on gillnets in the Bay of Fundy  and  appeared  to  minimise  harbour  porpoise  bycatch.  Similar  pingers  were  also  de‐ ployed  in  the  Makah  salmon  fishery  off  the  Seattle  coast  and  in  Australia  on  beach  protection nets with reasonable results (SGFEN, 2001).  More complex devices were developed after experiments with gillnets in the Gulf of  Maine (Kraus et al., 1997). A design operating at 10 kHz was found to be effective at  reducing  porpoise  bycatch  and  ultimately  formed  the  basis  for  legislation  under  NFMS  regulations.  In  the  regulations  the  specifications  for  porpoise  pingers  were  defined as 300ms pulses of 10 kHz tonal pulses repeated at 4 second intervals with a  minimum source level of 132dB re 1 μPa.  A third generation pinger was developed in the late 1990s by Loughborough Univer‐ sity in the UK on the basis of tests with captive porpoises in Holland and Denmark.  These “PICE‐97” devices were trialled successfully in the Danish cod fishery during  the  autumn  of  1997,  with  a  significant  reduction  in  Harbour  porpoise  bycatch  ob‐ served (Larsen, 1999). They differed from the original pingers in that they emitted a  variety of wide band frequency sweep type signals with randomised inter‐pulse in‐ tervals, rather than simple single tonal pulses.   Further research with these devices followed in the UK (Goodson et al., 2001), Medi‐ terranean (Imbert et al., 2002) and in the US (Barlow and Cameron, 1999) and at least  two devices the Aquamark and Dukane pingers had been shown to reduce bycatch.  In the STECF report of 2002 it was concluded:  “There  was  general  agreement  that  devices  considered  suitable  for  use  should  have  proven  aversive abilities within the fishery and for the species giving concern. Two of the currently  available devices (AQUAmark, Dukane) fitted this definition for bottom‐set gill nets and por‐ poises  and  therefore  could  be  regarded  as  suitable  standards  that  any  further  pinger  should  equal  or  exceed  in  these  circumstances.  It  was  noted  field  trials  to  demonstrate  operational  effectiveness were needed in addition to evidence of aversion by the species of concern to the  specific acoustic signal of any new device”.  STECF also recommended that within an overall management framework there must  be a monitoring and surveillance programme to identify fishery métiers, or times and  areas, where cetacean bycatch is a problem, and to provide quantitative estimates of  the levels of bycatch for each species/’stock’. Timely population assessments are also  required  within  this  framework.  There  must  be  a  recognised  means  of  determining   

184 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

unacceptable bycatch levels, and an institutional framework for devising bycatch re‐ duction  plans  where  these  are  necessary.  Beyond  this,  there  needs  to  be  a  means  of  implementing any bycatch reduction plan, including methods of enforcement, and of  continued monitoring and feedback to ensure the overall objectives are met. The sub‐ group concluded with a series of recommendations, headed by the recommendation  that  a  by  catch  management  framework  should  be established  at  an  EU  level at  the  earliest opportunity.   Management measures introduced after initial research

In  2004  the  EU  took  a  decision  to  better  protect  cetaceans  in  EU  waters,  following  much  of  the  advice  received  from  ICES  and  STECF.  The  measures  introduced  in  Regulation 812/2004 included a step by step reduction of the use of driftnets from 1  January  2005  until  complete  prohibition  by  1  January  2008,  the  monitoring  of  by‐ catches through observer schemes and the compulsory use of acoustic deterrent de‐ vices on fishing nets.  The  use  of  acoustic  devices  or  ʹpingersʹ,  was  made  mandatory  for  gillnet  fisheries  (from June 2005 for the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, from January 2006 in the Celtic  Sea  and  the  western  Channel  and  2007  in  the  eastern  Channel)  for  all  vessels  over  12m. The regulation provided technical specifications for the efficiency of the acoustic  deterrent  devices,  while  there  was  also  a  requirement  for  scientific  studies  or  pilot  projects to increase knowledge about the effects over time of the use of acoustic de‐ terrent  devices.  Member  States  were  encouraged  to  test  newly  developed  and  effi‐ cient  types  of  acoustic  deterrent  devices  not  in  conformity  with  the  technical  specifications laid down in this Regulation on a temporary basis.  Impact Assessment of the gear modifications

The measures introduced were to be closely monitored in order to allow for their ad‐ aptation over time, while Member States were tasked with ensuring full monitoring  of the state of cetacean populations as required under the Habitats Directive. Subse‐ quently,  though,  the  introduction  of  acoustic  deterrent  devices  under  Regulation  812/2004  has  been  compromised  due  to  a  combination  of  factors.  In  most  EU  coun‐ tries anecdotal evidence suggests there is only limited enforcement of the regulations  and only a limited number of vessels complying with the regulations; e.g. Denmark  reports  around  30  vessels,  while  Sweden  report  9  vessels  in  the  Baltic  Area  using  pingers. In both of these Member States pilot projects funded under FIFG have been  used  as  a  mechanism  to  supply  pingers  to  vessels.  Such  pilot  projects  or  grant  aid  schemes to offset costs for introduction have some merit but are not the complete so‐ lution and probably result in initial uptake by fishermen but as such schemes usually  only apply to first purchase, subsequent maintenance or replacement is at best spo‐ radic  In  addition,  adequately  quantifying  bycatch  of  protected  species  and  the  impact  of  introducing mitigation technologies requires essentially a high level of on board ob‐ server coverage (typically at a level of 25–30% of total fishing effort) to be able to pro‐ vide  accurate  estimates  and  associated  confidence  limits  around  estimates  (Northridge  and  Thomas,  2003).  Levels  of  coverage  by  nation  and  fishery  on  intro‐ duction  of  mitigation  technologies  are  frequently  at  much  lower  levels  than  this.  Regulation  812/2004  seeks  assessment  and  monitoring  of  the  impact  of  pingers  on  bycatch but in reality very few Member States have been able to carry out such moni‐ toring. This is mainly due to the costs involved in maintaining observer programmes.  In some cases a large amount of data from anecdotal sources has been used to sup‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 185

plement the quantitative data gathered from observer programmes. This lack of sys‐ tematic monitoring has prevented the true extent and potential impacts of pingers on  protected species bycatch from being fully understood or documented in EU waters.  Scientific monitoring is essential to identify unexpected negative effects of mitigation  devices.   It is also worth noting that fishermen in a number of European countries have raised  concerns  about  the  resilience  of  the  current  commercially  available  “pingers”  and  also the practicalities of using these devices for commercial fisheries. These concerns  have been addressed in a series of trials carried out in Ireland, UK, Sweden, Denmark  and France in 2005 and 2006 (Cosgrove et al., 2005). As a result of this work, all avail‐ able  models  of  pinger  have  now  been  extensively  assessed  in  terms  of  ease  of  use,  resistance  to  damage  and  long‐term  running  costs.  The  trials  have  highlighted  a  number  of  serious  issues  and  difficulties  relating  mainly  to  the  reliability  of  the  de‐ vices. Problems with deployment were found, although some of these problems have  been resolved by changes to rigging or operating practice. It is clear that more con‐ sideration of the construction, practical handling and deployment of such devices is  required before they can be considered a universal solution to certain bycatch prob‐ lems  in  gillnet  fisheries.  Costs  associated  with  the  introduction  of  mitigation  tech‐ nologies  remain  an  issue  for  fishermen  and  ways  to  help  mitigate  economic  costs  should  be  carefully  considered.  For  instance  the  requirement  for  fishermen  to  use  pingers  under  Regulation  812/2004  has  very  real  cost  implications  for  fishermen.  In  Europe current commercially available devices cost in the region of €50–100 per de‐ vice and a vessel fishing with 10km of gillnet gear using the recommended spacing  between devices of 100m‐200m would require 50–100 devices at a cost in the region  of  €2,500–5,000.  Given  there  are  still  technical  difficulties  with  these  devices,  which  were  flagged  when  812/2004  was  being  formulated,  these  costs  are  significant  and  have undoubtedly been a hindrance to acceptance by fishermen in Europe.   In  adopting measures it  is  important  to  define  which  species  the  mitigation devices  are  designed  to  protect.  Once  again  in  this  respect  Regulation  812/2004  is  perhaps  flawed given the objective of the regulation is to mitigate incidental catches of ceta‐ cean  species  in  general.  Research  and  development,  however,  has  mainly  been  fo‐ cused  on  the  use  of  pingers  to  reduce  harbour  porpoise  bycatch  in  gillnet  fisheries  and  the  results  of  trials  involving  other  cetacean  species  are  less  clear‐cut,  with  somewhat contradicting results (Barlow and Cameron, 2003; Anon., 2006). It is likely  that the use of pingers in their present form as required in Regulation 812, even with  100% compliance would lead to a reduction in bycatch of species such as common or  bottlenose dolphins.  At  the  currently  there  are  five  recognised  manufacturers  of  commercial  pingers,  al‐ though other “cruder” devices exist. Two of these devices are made in the US, one in  the UK, one in Italy and one in the Netherlands. While their signal characteristics are  well suited for Harbour porpoises, only limited success has been achieved with other  cetacean  species.  For  species  such as  bottlenose  dolphins,  tests  have  shown  them  to  be wholly ineffective (Anon., 2006).   Conclusion

In  conclusion  it  is  clear  that  the  successful  implementation  of  a  framework  for  by‐ catch reduction can be encouraged by appropriate legislation, while conversely legis‐ lation  can  also  unwittingly  be  an  impediment  to  successful  introduction  of  bycatch  mitigation technologies (ICES, 2008). Framing legislation therefore needs to be done  after consideration of all of the issues raised above. In this sense 812/2004 has largely   

186 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

failed in introducing the use of pingers into the identified problem fisheries by being  unrealistically  prescriptive  and  not  taking  account  of  all  of  the  technical,  biological  and economic issues fully. In this case there has perhaps been a failure by managers  to consider all of the issues and impacts of adopting legislation to use bycatch reduc‐ tion devices leading to:   •

Poor compliance by fishermen with the regulations; 



Negative Ecological Impacts; 



Economic Impacts on stakeholders; 



Technical Problems with the devices; 



Biological Impacts; 



Poor monitoring; and 



Poor acceptance by stakeholders. 

References Anon. 2006. Nephrops and Cetacean species selection information and technology. EU Project  NECESSITY. 501605. Interim Report (restricted).  Barlow, J., and Cameron, G.A. 2003. Field experiments show that acoustic pingers reduce ma‐ rine  mammal  bycatch  in  the  California  drift  gillnet  fishery.  Presented  to  the  Scientific  Committee of the International Whaling Commission, Grenada, 1999.  Barlow,  J.,  and  G.  A.  Cameron.  1999.  Field  Experiments  Show  that  Acoustic  Pingers  Reduce  Marine Mammal Bycatch in the California Drift Gillnet Fishery. Presented to the Scientific  Committee of the International Whaling Commission, Grenada, 1999.  Caddell,  R.  2005.  Bycatch  mitigation  and  the  protection  of  cetaceans:  recent  developments  in  EC law. Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy.  Cosgrove,  R.,  Browne,  D.,  and  Robson,  S.  2005.  Assessment  of  Acoustic  Deterrent  Devices  in  Irish Gill Net and Tangle Net Fisheries. BIM Report, 05MT07. 30pp.  Goodson, A.D., Datta, S., Di Natale, A., Dremiere, P‐Y. 2001. Project ADEPTs ‐ AcousticDeter‐ rents to Eliminate Predation on Trammels. Final Report to the European Commission DX  XIV 898/019, p110+Appendices and a CD‐Database.  ICES. 2008. Report of the Study Group for Bycatch of Protected Species (SGBYC), 29–31 Janu‐ ary 2008, ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark. ICES CM 2008/ACOM:48. 82 pp.  Imbert, G., J.‐C. Gaertner, S. Cerbonne, and L. Laubier. 2002. Effet des repusifs acoustiques sur  la capture de dauphins dans les thonailles. Report to the Direction de lʹAgriculture et des  Ressources Naturelles. Universite de la Mediterranee Centre DʹOceanologie de Marseille,  Marseille.  Kraus, S.D., Read, A.J., Solow, A., Baldwin, K., Spradlin, T., Anderson, E., Williamson, J. 1997.  Acoustic alarms reduce porpoise mortality. Nature, 388: 525–526.  Larsen, F. 1999. The effect of acoustic alarms on the bycatch of harbour porpoises in the Danish  North Sea set gill net fishery: a preliminary analysis. Paper SC/51/SM41 submitted to the  51st IWC meeting, Grenada.  Northridge,  S.P.,  and  Thomas,  L.  2003.  Monitoring  levels  required  in  European  fisheries  to  assess cetacean bycatch, with particular reference to the UK fisheries. Final Report to DE‐ FRA (EWD). 37pp.  SGFEN  (Subgroup  on  Fishery  and  Environment).  2002.  Incidental  catches  of  small  cetaceans.  Report of the second meeting of the subgroup on fishery and environment (SGFEN) of the  scientific,  technical,  and  economic  committee  for  fisheries  (STECF),  Brussels,  11–14  June  2002.  Commission  Staff  Working  Paper,  Commission  of  the  European  Communities.  SEC(2002) 1134.63pp. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 187

SGFEN  (Subgroup  on  Fishery  and  Environment).  2001.  Incidental  catches  of  small  cetaceans.  Report  of  the  first  meeting  of  the  subgroup  on  fishery  and  environment  (SGFEN)  of  the  scientific,  technical,  and  economic  committee  for  fisheries  (STECF),  Brussels,  10–14  De‐ cember 2001. Commission Staff Working Paper, Commission of the European Communi‐ ties. SEC(2002) 376.83pp.  Tregenza, N. J. C., Berrow, S. D. et al. 1997. Harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena L.) bycatch in  set gillnets in the Celtic Sea. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 54(5): 896–904.  Werner, T., Kraus, S., Read, A., and Zollet, E. 2006. Fishing techniques to reduce the bycatch of  threatened marine animals. Marine Technology Society Journal, Volume 40, 3: 50–68. 

Case study 2 – Farne Deep Nephrops fishery, England Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation

The  EU  Nephrops  norvegicus  fishery  in  the  North  Sea  is  currently  managed  by  three  regulatory mechanisms: output (for some species) is restricted by TACs; input is con‐ trolled  by  limiting  days‐at‐sea;  and  exploitation  patterns  are  modified  by  technical  conservation measures specifying gear restrictions and Minimum Landing Sizes. An  important Nephrops trawl fishery in the North Sea lies adjacent to the Farne Deep, off  the  east  coast  of  England.  In  the  2001/2002  season,  up  to  82  vessels  worked  on  this  fishery;  the  fleet  consisted of  vessels  less  than 30m  long.  The  vessels  use  single  and  twin Nephrops otter trawls. Nets with a small mesh size are legally allowed to catch  Nephrops norvegicus, compared to other demersal whitefish species and consequently  large quantities of other organisms can also be caught, and much of this is discarded  dead. Since 2002 the fleet number has fluctuated but a significant fleet still prosecutes  this fishery.  Drivers that initiated gear measures being introduced

The amount of material caught and subsequently discarded in the English Nephrops  fishery  was  estimated  at  4890  tonnes  in  the  2001/2002  season  equating  to  a  discard  rate of 57%. Discards in this fishery are dominated by whiting; other significant com‐ ponents of the discards include haddock, Nephrops and commercial flatfish species. It  has been estimated that whiting discards from this fishery account for 16% of the es‐ timated  whiting  discards  for  the  entire  North  Sea.  The  weight  of discarded  whiting  was estimated at six times that of the landed weight.  Scientists  considered  that  the  high  discard  mortality  on  small  commercial  fish  was  destructive and had contributed to the decline of the important North Sea stocks and  consequent reduction in yields. Moreover, changes in community structure through  discarding, either directly through discard mortality or indirectly, modify the energy  flow  through  foodwebs  with  the  potential  to  alter  ecosystem  dynamics.  Therefore,  the economic and ecological consequences of discarding are intrinsically linked and  not  confined  to  the  direct  mortality  of  commercial  species.  Despite  the  absence  of  predictable outcomes for the reduction in discards of all species, reducing discards of  all  species  meets  the  requirements  of  the  precautionary  principle  and  ecosystem‐ based approach as defined in EU legislation, the Bergen Declaration and OSPAR bio‐ diversity action plans.  Mitigation measures or gear changes tested

Considerable  research  into  fishing  gear‐based  measures  to  improve  selectivity  has  been  undertaken.  The  potential  for  structural  changes  in  trawls  to  facilitate  the  re‐ lease of unwanted fish was recognized as early as the 1980s and is the method of dis‐ card  reduction  most  supported  by  North  Shields  fishers.  The  different  behaviours   

188 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

exhibited by the main discarded species in Nephrops trawl fisheries can be exploited  to improve the selectivity of trawls. Whiting and haddock rise when inside the trawl,  while Nephrops and cod remain near the bottom. Separating cod, and other ground‐ fish,  from  Nephrops  remains  the  most  challenging  task  for  gear  technologists  in  this  fishery. However, a recent review concluded that there is currently adequate techni‐ cal ability to significantly improve the selectivity of Nephrops trawls.  If the aim of fishery managers is to retain as much of the marketable fish as possible  but  to  reduce  discards,  then  designs  involving  Square  Mesh  Panels,  constructed  of  large  mesh,  high‐strength  thin  twine,  possibly  in  combination  with  guiding  pan‐ els/funnels/ropes should be further developed. If, however, the aim of managers is to  minimise all fish catch or the catch of a particular overexploited species, such as cod,  then  a  move  towards  a  single‐species  fishery  is  more  appropriate.  A  selection  grid  system, or prawn trawls historically used, with low openings and reduced top sheet  lengths offer promising solutions in this instance.  The relative difference of the effect on North Sea fish stocks of introducing five trawl  designs  developed  by  gear  technologists  has  been  modelled.  The  designs  included  using a square‐mesh panel constructed of high strength and low diameter material, a  selection  grid  in  combination  with  a  square‐mesh  codend,  using  two  square  mesh  panels, a cutaway trawl (with a setback headline) and a 100mm codend. All the de‐ signs indicated that they would have a positive effect on the North Sea whiting stock.  However, only through the implementation of a trawl with a grid combined with a  square‐mesh  codend  was  there  likely  to  be  any  positive  effect  on  haddock  and  cod  stocks. This is because this was the only design that reduced the catches of fish of all  sizes and not just the juveniles and also because this fishery caught few haddock and  cod relative to other fisheries in the North Sea.  Management measures introduced after initial research

Some of the selective designs developed have been implemented. The insertion of a  square‐mesh  panel  into  the  topsheet  of  single‐rigged  trawls  has  been  mandatory  since  1991/92  and  an  additional  140mm  diamond  mesh  panel  inserted  behind  the  headline  since  January  2002.  Furthermore,  prior  to  2002  the  minimum  legal  codend  mesh  size  was 70mm for  single‐rigged  trawls,  but  since  January 2002,  this  has been  increased  to  80mm.  The  threat  of  severe  restrictions  to  fishing  opportunities  or  clo‐ sure of the English Nephrops fishery in 2002 in conjunction with the new regulations  imposed on other fisheries provided the incentive to implement these gear changes.  Impact Assessment of the gear modifications

There  has  also  been  some  evaluation  of  the  effectiveness  of  these  regulations.  The  composition of catches was monitored just before and after these regulatory changes.  The trawl modifications demonstrated a reduction in discard rate for whiting of 11%.  A second more recent study, utilising observer data to compare a longer period be‐ fore and after the introduction of these changes has also shown that whiting selectiv‐ ity  has  improved.  The  threat  of  severe  fishing  restrictions  was  originally  due  to  the  poor status of the cod stock, however the regulations introduced were more likely to  reduce the capture of small haddock and whiting rather than benefit cod. Therefore,  although the regulations successfully reduced whiting discards it is not clear whether  the objectives of the managers were met. The new regulations introduced in the Farne  Deep fishery did, however, allow the fishery to continue without further restrictions  on fishing. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 189

As  part  of  the  2007  EU‐Norway  negotiations,  it  was  agreed  that  the  selectivity  of  whiting in vessels using trawls with an 80–99mm mesh net in the North Sea would be  improved. This sector includes the vessels of this Nephrops fishery; a reduction of 40%  in  whiting  discards  was  agreed.  In  2008,  trials  of  a  double  square‐mesh  panel,  con‐ structed of high strength low diameter twine will be undertaken onboard trawlers in  this  fishery.  Based  on  previous  trials  this  will  meet  the  required  objectives.  The  mechanism  by  which  regulations  have  been  implemented  in  this  fishery  illustrates  that  there  is  adequate  technical  ability  to  significantly  improve  the  selectivity  of  Nephrops trawls but fishers are not taking up the developments until the sufficient  level of incentive is generated.  Conclusions

It  is  apparent  that  technical  measures  in  this  case  i.e.  the  gear  modifications  high‐ lighted  do  provide  a  partial  solution  to  discarding  problems  in  North  Sea  Nephrops  fisheries.  All  are  technically  feasible  and  workable,  with  some  shown  to  provide  much  improved  selectivity  but  with  corresponding  losses  of  marketable  fish  which  have  been  a  stumbling  block  for  their  voluntary  adoption  by  fishermen.  In  the  ab‐ sence of appropriate incentives in terms of increased quota allocation or market posi‐ tion it is unlikely that this will change much in the near future without a change in  focus in management..   References Catchpole, T.L., Revill, A.S. 2008. Gear technology in Nephrops trawl fisheries. Reviews in Fish  Biology and Fisheries, 18, 17–31.  Catchpole,  T.L.,  Tidd,  A.N.,  Kell,  L.T.,  Revill,  A.S.,  Dunlin,  G.  2007.  The  potential  for  new  Nephrops trawl designs t positively effect North Sea stocks of cod, haddock and whiting.  Fisheries Research, 86, 262–267.  Catchpole,  T.L.,  Revill,  A.S.,  Dunlin,  G.  2006.  An  assessment  of  the  Swedish  grid  and  square  mesh codend in the English (Farne Deeps) Nephrops fishery. Fisheries Research, 81, 118– 125.  Catchpole, T.L., Frid, C.L.J., Gray, T.S. 2006. Resolving the discard problem ‐ A case study of  the English Nephrops fishery. Marine Policy 30, 821–831.  Catchpole, T.L., Frid, C.L.J., Gray, T.S. 2006. Importance of discards from the English Nephrops  norvegicus fishery in the North Sea to marine scavengers. Marine Ecology Progress Series,  313, 215–226.  Catchpole,  T.L.,  Frid,  C.L.J.,  Gray,  T.S.  2005.  Discarding  in  the  English  north‐east  Nephrops  norvegicus fishery: the role of social and environmental factors. Fisheries Research 72, 45– 54.  Enever, R., Revill, A. S., Grant, A. Discarding in the North Sea and on the historical efficacy of  gear‐based technical measures in reducing discards. Cefas, Unpubl.  Revill,  A.S.,  Dunlin,  G.,  Holst,  R.  2006.  Selective  properties  of  the  cutaway  trawl  and  several  other  commercial  trawls  used  in  the  Farne  Deeps  North  Sea  Nephrops  fishery.  Fisheries  research, 81, 268–275.  Revill,  A.S.,  Catchpole,  T.L.,  Dunlin,  G.  2007.  Recent  work  to  improve  the  efficacy  of  square‐ mesh  panels  used  in  a  North  Sea  Nephrops  norvegicus  directed  fishery.  Fisheries  Re‐ search, 85, 335–341. 

 

190 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Case study 3 – Flatfish beam trawl fisheries, Belgium, the Netherlands, UK Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation

Belgium,  the Netherlands and  the  United  Kingdom (UK) are  the  main  nations  with  beam  trawl  fisheries.  These  fleets  target  species  such  as  flatfish,  mainly  sole  (Solea  solea) and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), and round fish species as cod (Gadus morhua).  The fishing grounds are the greater North Sea, the Celtic Sea, Irish Sea and the Bay of  Biscay (OSPAR‐regions II, III and IV) in ICES‐Subareas IVa, b, c, VIIa, d, e, g, h and  VIIIa. The activities of these fleets have been well studied and the effort patterns, as  well as the impacts are probably as well documented as any fleet in the EU.  Drivers that initiated gear measures being introduced

The most important direct ecosystem effects of beam trawl fisheries are on habitats,  benthos, commercial fish species and wider fish communities (ICES, 2006). This case‐ study  focuses  on  the  technical  alterations  to  beam  trawls  that  can  reduce  the  direct  ecosystem effects of this fishing method. The need for selective beam trawls is recog‐ nised  at  many  levels.  A  midterm  review  of  the  Common  Fisheries  Policy  (Anon.,  1991) at that time stressed the importance of reducing fish discards and the need for  more research and acceptance of selective gears by fishermen. Later on, in 2002, the  green  paper  of  the  European  Commission  on  the  Common  Fisheries  Policy  (http://europa.eu.int/comm/fisheries/greenpaper/green1_nl.htm) stated that there was  a  need  to  further  develop  an  ecosystem‐oriented  approach  to  all  areas  of  fishery  management,  including  fishing  gear  technology.  This  implied  that  gear  technology  research should not only focus on the effects of beam trawl fisheries on commercial  fish species, but also on other ecosystem effects. As beam trawl fisheries also have a  considerable  impact  on  the  biomass,  production  and  diversity  of  benthic  communi‐ ties (e.g. Lindeboom and de Groot, 1998; Løkkeborg, 2005; Hiddink et al., 2006, Kaiser  et  al.,  2006;  Queirós  et  al.,  2006),  research  has  investigated  ways  to  overcome  these  problems.  Mitigation measures or gear changes tested

There  have  been  numerous  projects  on  ways  to  improve  fish  selectivity  in  flatfish  beam  trawls.  In  the  SOBETRA  project  (Optimization  of  a  species  selective  beam  trawl) (Fonteyne et al., 1997; van Marlen, 2003) a number of gear modifications were  tested,  aimed  at  the  reduction  of  demersal  fish  discards  in  the  flatfish  beam  trawl  fisheries. The gear modifications tested aimed to create large escape zones for round  fish  in  the  top  panel  of  the  beam  trawl  without  affecting  the  catch  of  flatfish.  Two  types of escape openings were tested for R‐nets (beam trawlers using chain matrix),  namely  square  mesh  top  panels  and  cutaway  covers  (reduced  top  sheets),  and  whereas large mesh top panels have been tested for V‐nets (beam trawlers using tick‐ ler  chains).  Several  representative  categories  of  vessels  were  chosen  to  test  the  new  designs  extensively  under  commercial  conditions  through  the  catch  comparison  methodology. In general it was found that the species selectivity of the beam trawls  could be improved for whiting and haddock, but much less for cod. This is in accor‐ dance with underwater observations showing that round fish species stay in different  levels in a trawl with haddock in the upper level, whiting in the middle and cod in  the lower level (Main and Sangster, 1982). Hence, the fish closest to the escape zone  in  the  upper  level  have  more  chance  to  swim  out  of  the  trawl  before  entering  the  codend.  These  modifications  were  proven  to  work  although  the  degree  of  success  depended on the vessel size and gear size due to the fact that on smaller vessels using  smaller nets the escape opening cannot be made sufficiently large to allow adequate   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 191

escape  of  round  fish  without  incurring  losses  of  flatfish.  Therefore  the  conclusion  from this work was that the results did not necessarily justify the use of these species  selective devices across all beam trawl vessels.  Mitigating the effects of flatfish beam trawls on benthic invertebrates has been inves‐ tigated  in  the  EU‐project  “REDUCE”  (Anon.,  2002;  Fonteyne  and  Polet,  2002;  van  Marlen  et  al.,  2005),  several  national  projects  (the  UK  national  FIFG  funded  project  FGE  158,  the  Belgian  EFF  funded  project  “IDEV”)  and  is  currently  under  investiga‐ tion  in  the  EU‐project  “DEGREE”.  Beam  trawls  cause  direct  mortality  to  benthos  in  two ways (Revill and Jennings, 2005). First, the shoes, tickler chains or chain mat hit  animals  on  the  seabed  (Bergman  and  van  Santbrink,  2000).  Second,  animals  are  caught in the net and die from injuries sustained in the net, during hauling or when  the  catch  is  processed  and/or  discarded  (Lindeboom  and  de  Groot,  1998).  The  most  effective way to reduce the environmental impact of beam trawling is to control the  mortality caused by shoes, tickler chains or chain mats hitting animals on the seabed  (Bergman and van Santbrink 2000). While removing the ground gear and using other  approaches  such  as  wheels,  water  jets,  dropper  chains,  brushes,  etc,  to  drive  target  species  out  of  the  substratum  can  achieve  this;  commercially  acceptable  methods  have yet to be fully developed (Anon., 2002; Revill and Jennings, 2005). Again losses  of target species have been a problem. The use of electric pulses as alternative stimu‐ lus is currently under investigations in the Netherlands (van Marlen et al., 2006) and  again this has shown to be technically feasible although there are concerns from fish‐ ermen on catch levels of sole, while there are concerns from ecologists of the impacts  on  fish  that  encounter  the  electrical  stimuli  but  are  not  subsequently  caught.  (ICES,  2005).  Bycatch mortality of benthic organisms accounts for 5–10% of the total benthic mor‐ tality  caused  by  beam  trawling.  Commercially  acceptable  technical  modifications  have been developed for this kind of mortality. The benthos release panel seems to be  a simple and practical solution to release by‐caught benthic invertebrates from a flat‐ fish  beam  trawl  without  substantial  loss  of  commercial  fish  species  (Fonteyne  and  Polet,  2002;  Revill  and  Jennings,  2005;  van  Marlen  et  al.,  2005).  The  mesh  size  used  needs to be balanced against the reduction in benthos catch and the loss of commer‐ cial  fish  species  through  the  panel  that  can  be  experienced.  Based  on  the  research  work carried out with this gear modification, a mesh size of 150 mm seems to be the  best compromise.  Management measures introduced after initial research

In the framework of the Council Regulation laying down certain technical measures  for  the  conservation  of  fisheries  resources  (850/98),  a  general  increase  in  mesh  size  and the use of square mesh panels in towed gears was suggested to improve the se‐ lectivity  of  towed  fishing  gears.  On  19  October  2001,  EU  Regulation  2056/2001  was  adopted, establishing additional technical measures for the recovery of the stocks of  cod  in  the  North  Sea  and  to  the  West  of  Scotland.  It  included  a  provision  for  the  minimum codend mesh size of beam trawls in the North Sea must be 80 mm South of  56° N, and 120 mm North of 56 °N (with a restricted area in the western part of the  central  North  Sea,  where  codends  of  100  mm  mesh  size  were  made  compulsory).  However,  a  general  increase  in  mesh  size  as  first  suggested  in  earlier  drafts  of  the  regulations was firmly rejected due to perceived losses of sole catches. These regula‐ tions also included the mandatory insertion of a panel of no less than 180mm in the  top panel of all beam trawls. 

 

192 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

It is interesting to note that in the SOBETRA‐project, Fonteyne et al. (1997) advised on  the basis of the results with square mesh top panels, cutaway cover sheets or a large  mesh  cover  sheets  that  these  modifications  be  included  in  future  regulations.  The  mesh size used in beam trawls at that time, was 120mm, occasionally 150mm if sole  were not the target species (Lindeboom and de Groot, 1998). The findings of SOBE‐ TRA  were  partially  taken  on  board  in  Regulation  2056/2001  with  the  provisions  for  the  use  of  the  180mm  panel  but  these  mesh  sizes  were  a  lot  smaller  than  the  ones  suggested  by  Fonteyne  et  al.  (1997)  and  did  not  differ  according  to  vessel  size  con‐ trary  to  the  findings  of  the  SOBETRA  project  that  clearly  demonstrated  big  differ‐ ences in catches with such panels depending on vessel size. Effectively the regulation  took account of the findings of research work but did not necessarily implement it as  recommended.   On a more positive note there a number of other discard (fish and benthos) reduction  devices  such  as  benthic  release  panels  that  are  not  currently  included  in  technical  measures legislation, however, there is evidence of increasing voluntary use of some  of  them.  The  Belgian  and  Dutch  fishermen’s  organisation  each  have  setup  national  Working  Group  specifically  examining  technical  modifications  to  beam  trawls  for  discard  reduction.  Included  within  this  Working  Group  is  a  commitment  that  the  modifications agreed by fishermen’s will be scientifically tested by the research insti‐ tutes  IMARES  (NL)  and/or  ILVO  (B).  The  UK  beam  trawl  fisheries  sector  is  taking  similar  initiatives  through  the  Fisheries  Science  Partnership,  building  relationships  between scientists from CEFAS (UK) and fishermen (Revill et al., 2007).   The use of more selective beam trawl gear is also being driven by the market place as  well.  Public perception  of  beam  trawl caught  fish  has  become  increasingly  negative  putting pressure on fishermen to adopt more responsible fishing practices. This move  has  gained  increasing  momentum  worldwide  with  the  advent  of  certification  schemes  such  as  MSc  and  also  through  competitions  such  as  the  WWF  Smart  Gear  competition or the Responsible Fishing Gear competition in the UK. The effectiveness  of the modifications is in this way better supported by the fishing industry and is bet‐ ter adapted to different fishing grounds (A. Revill, pers. comm.).  Impact Assessment of the gear modifications

The  effect  of  the  existing  regulations  under  850/98  and  the  additional  requirements  included in 2056/2001 designed to improve species selectivity have not been properly  evaluated.  Enever  et  al.  (submitted)  has  showed  a  significant  reduction  in  fish  dis‐ cards  by  number  by  increasing  mesh  sizes  from  80–89mm  to  90–110mm  and  110– 120mm (Figure 20–1) but other than the original SOBETRA project there has been no  assessment of the effect on stocks of using the 180mm panel.    

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 193

 

Figure 20–1. Proportion of catch discarded (all finfish numbers combined) by English and Welsh  registered  beam  trawlers  (b)  in  the  North  Sea  between  1999  and  2006  fitted  for  varying  codend  mesh size groups (Modified from Enever et al., submitted). 

Regarding  the  other  devices  tested  again  only  limited  assessment  has  been  carried  out. Some survival studies have been completed with Benthic Release panels and im‐ pact studies of the electric beam trawl are ongoing.  Conclusions

The  introduction  of  gear based  technical  measures into  the  beam  trawl  fleets  to  im‐ prove selectivity and reduce impact on benthic organisms largely mirrors the previ‐ ous  case  study  in  the  Nephrops  fisheries.  The  gear  measures  developed  are  all  technically  feasible  but  have  not  necessarily  been  translated  into  legislation.  In  the  case of the large mesh top sheet or square mesh panels tested the recommendations  from  testing  have  not  necessarily  been  correctly  interpreted  into  regulations.  The  voluntary uptake of the benthos release panel in particular is more encouraging and  seems to be growing. The motivation for this is largely market driven.   Assessment of the impacts of the measures has proven difficult and therefore largely  is a work in progress. Scientific follow‐up will be difficult without fishermen’s coop‐ eration, a high input from them will be needed for any assessment. The study by En‐ ever  et  al.  (submitted)  though  has  shown  technical  management  measures  for  the  protection of fish species can work. Other technical measures are still under investi‐ gation, e.g. electrified beam trawling, T90‐ and square mesh codends but indications  are  that  a  combination  of  modifications,  focusing  on  the  reduction  of  discards,  has  potential (Depestele et al., 2008), especially for fish species and to a lesser extent for  invertebrate species.  Their  effect  on  the  reduction  of  short‐term  direct  mortality  has  been estimated during sea trials in the developmental stage. The potential effects on  fish  and/or  benthic  invertebrate  populations  on  the  other  hand  has  up  till  now  not  been modelled prior to implementation, nor assessed after implementation. Attempts  for  estimating  the  efficacy  of  technical  modifications  on  the  fleet  level  are  currently  undertaken in the EU‐project “DEGREE”.  References

Anon. 1991. The Common  Fisheries Policy ‐ mid‐term review. Proceedings of the Conference  held in Cork, Ireland on 10th and 11th May 1991, 54pp. 

 

194 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Anon. 2002. Reduction of Adverse Environmental Impact of Demersal Trawls (REDUCE). Final  Report of EU‐contract FAIR CT‐97–3809. National University of Ireland, Ireland. 257pp.  Bergman,  M.J.N.,  van  Santbrink,  J.W.  2000.  Mortality  in  megafaunal  benthic  populations  caused by trawl fisheries on the Dutch continental shelf in the North Sea in 1994. ICES J.  mar. Sci., 57: 1321–1331.  Depestele,  J.,  Polet,  H.,  Van  Craeynest,  K.,  and  Vandendriessche,  S.,  2008.  A  compilation  of  length and species selectivity improving alterations to beam trawls. Project report. Project  no.  VIS/07/B/04/DIV.  Study  carried  out  with  the  Financial  support  of  the  Flemisch  Com‐ munity,  the  European  Commission  (FIOV)  and  Stichting  Duurzame  Visserijontwikkeling  vzw. Promotor: Stichting Duurzame Visserijontwikkeling vzw. 56p.  Enever, R., Revill, A. S., and Grant, A. Submitted. Discarding in the North Sea and on the his‐ torical efficacy of gear‐based technical measures in reducing discards. Fish. Res.  Fonteyne,  R.  1997.  Optimization  of  a  species  selective  beam  trawl  (SOBETRA).  Final  Project  Report EU‐Project AIR2‐CT93–1015.  Fonteyne,  R.,  and  Polet,  H.  2002.  Reducing  the  benthos  bycatch  in  flatfish  beam  trawling  by  means of technical modifications. Fish. Res. 55, 219–230.  Hiddink, J.G., Jennings, S., Kaiser, M.J., Queir, A.M., Duplisea, D.E., Piet, G.J. 2006. Cumulative  impacts of seabed trawl disturbance on benthic biomass, production, and species richness  in different habitats. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 63: 721–736.  ICES. 2006. Report of the Working Group on Ecosystem Effects of Fishing Activities (WGECO),  5 12 April 2006, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen. ACE:05. 174 pp.  Kaiser,  M.J.,  Clarke,  K.R.,  Hinz,  H., Austen, M.C.V.,  Somerfield,  P.J.,  and Karakakkis,  I. 2006.  Global analysis of response and recovery of benthic biota to fishing. Mar. Ecol. Progr. Ser.,  311: 1–14.  Lindeboom, H.J., and de Groot, S.J. 1998. Impact‐II: The effects of different types of fisheries on  the North Sea and Irish Sea benthic ecosystems. NIOZ‐rapport, 1998(1). Netherlands Insti‐ tute for Sea Research: Den Burg, Texel (The Netherlands). 404 pp.  Løkkeborg, S. 2005. Impacts of trawling and scallop dredging on benthic habitats and commu‐ nities. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 472. Rome, FAO. 2005. 58 pp.  Main, J., and Sangster, G.I. 1982. A study of a multi‐level bottom trawl for species separation  using direct observation techniques. Scottish Fisheries Research Report No. 26, 17 pp.  Marlen, B. van, 2003. Improving the selectivity of beam trawls in The Netherlands: the effect of  large mesh top panels on the catch rates of sole, plaice, cod and whiting Fisheries Research  63 (2). ‐ p. 155 – 168.   Marlen, B. Van, Bergman, M.J.N., Groenewold, S., Fonds, M. 2005. New approaches to the re‐ duction of non‐target mortality in beam trawling. Fisheries Research 72 (2–3): 333–345.   Marlen, B. Van, Grift, R.E.; Keeken, O.A. van, Ybema, M.S., Hal, R. van, 2006. Performance of  pulse  trawling  compared  to  conventional  beam  trawling.  IJmuiden:  IMARES,  (Report  C014/06) ‐ p. 60.  Queirós,  A.M.,  Hiddink,  J.G.,  Kaiser,  M.J.,  Hinz,  H.  2006.  Effects  of  chronic  bottom  trawling  disturbance on benthic biomass, production and size spectra in different habitats. J. Exp.  Mar. Biol. Ecol., 335, 91–103.  Revill, A.S., Jennings, S.J., 2005. The capacity of benthos release panels to reduce the impacts of  beam trawls on benthic communities. Fish. Res. 75, 73–85. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 195

Case study 4 – shrimp beam trawl fisheries, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, UK Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation and drivers that initiated gear measures being introduced

The  shrimp  beam  trawl  fisheries  in  the  North  Sea  and  a  summary  of  the  state  of  knowledge concerning its impact upon benthic habitats and the wider marine ecosys‐ tem  has  been  described  by  WGECO  in  2007  (ICES,  2007b)  and  acknowledged  by  WGFTFB  in  2007  (ICES,  2007a).  WGCRAN,  in  responding  to  the  WGECO  report  of  2007, perceived some of the findings of the WGECO report to be incorrect or give a  misleading picture of the C. crangon fisheries (ICES, 2007c). WGECO concluded that  the  removal of  the  target species (C.  crangon)  and  the  unwanted  bycatch  of  juvenile  commercial fish to be major concerns in these fisheries. WGCRAN concluded that the  former  one  is  not  considered  as  a  primary  concern  as  the  removal  of  C.  crangon  is  necessary for the fishery to be viable and an unavoidable consequence of the fishery  (ICES, 2007a). Moreover, Crangon stocks do not show signs of overexploitation (ICES,  2007a; ICES 2007c; Suuronen and Sarda, 2007). The latter concern of fish bycatch has  largely been addressed by gear research.  Mitigation measures or gear changes tested, management measures introduced after initial research and impact assessment of the gear modifications

Revill et al. (1999), Revill (2001) and Polet (2003) assessed the likely outcomes of the  use of selective trawls in the Crangon fisheries in terms of the benefits to fish stocks  and  their  future  landings.  This  research  triggered  the  current  technical  measures  (sieve nets and rigid grids) introduced into legislation in 2003 for the C. crangon fish‐ eries (ICES, 2007a). This technical management measure has been assessed in a study  of the UK fishery (Catchpole et al., 2008). ICES (2007a) and this study legitimately as‐ sumed, given the similarity between fisheries that these findings can be applied to the  North Sea C. Crangon fishery and concluded that sieve nets appear to function as in‐ tended in reducing bycatch of unwanted fish species but derogations applying to the  main EU brown shrimp fleets of Germany and The Netherlands, which state that no  selection device is required for up to half of the year do compound the situation.  Overall,  the  legislation  reduces  the  undesirable  capture  of  unwanted  marine  organ‐ isms and, as such, is consistent with the requirements of the precautionary principle  and  ecosystem‐approach  as  defined  in  EU  legislation.  It  is  particularly  effective  at  reducing  bycatch  levels  of  cod  and  relatively  larger  fish  of  all  species  (>10  cm  in  length), but less so at reducing 0 group plaice, which make up the largest component  of  the  bycatch.  The  legislation  has  had  a  positive  effect,  and  it  represents  the  best  available solution, but it does not sufficiently address the bycatch issue in the Crangon  fishery.  WGFTFB in its review of the fisheries concluded that the existing technical measures  used  in  these  fisheries are the  most  effective  gear‐modifications available at  present  for  reducing  bycatch.  However,  the  ICES‐FAO  WGFTFB  also  recommended  that  these existing technical measures are only partially effective, and that there is a clear  need to develop further measures to reduce discarding in these fisheries beyond ex‐ isting levels (i.e. new gears, spatial / temporal measures etc). These findings are con‐ firmed by Suuronen and Sarda (2008).  WGFTFB recommended:   •

That technical development with on‐board catch processing and deck sort‐ ing  equipment  (i.e.  rotary  riddles  with  constant  running  water)  may  fur‐  

196 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

ther  improve  discard  survival  rates,  but  that  scientific  follow‐up  studies  are required to confirm this.  •

Their  should  be  support  for  the  research  and  development  of  new  meas‐ ures which could be used to effectively harvest C. crangon while reducing  discards of unwanted species beyond current levels.  



That  the  electric‐shrimp  beam  trawl  may  be  one  such  technical  measure,  but as yet it is in too early a stage of development to be able to evaluate its  potential effects on the ecosystem or its fishing efficiency.  



That any new technical measure, which utilises electrical stimulation as a  component, should be accompanied by thorough and rigorous evaluations  as to their potential environmental impact and fishing efficiency at the ear‐ liest stage possible. 

Impact Assessment of the gear modifications

In  January  2003,  legislation  was  introduced  requiring  all  fishers  in  the  European  Crangon crangon (brown shrimp) fisheries to use selective gear (sieve net or a selection  grid)  that  reduces  the  incidental  bycatch  of  juvenile  commercial  fish  species.  Each  member  state  was  responsible  for  implementing  their  own  legislation  enforceable  within their national waters. The efficacy of the UK legislation (The Shrimp Fishing  Nets Order) was evaluated in a multi‐disciplinary study using social, biological and  economic methods.  The  social  analysis  was  used  to  identify  changes  in  fleet  structure  and  fishing  pat‐ terns  since  the  legislations  introduction  and  the  extent  of  compliance  and  enforce‐ ment.  The  biological  analysis  evaluated  the  performance  of  commercially  used  selective gear and also identified changes in fish stocks of bycatch species. The eco‐ nomic  analysis  assessed  the  economic  implications  of  the  legislation.  The  retrospec‐ tive change in productivity of the brown shrimp fleet as a consequence of the use of  sieve nets was estimated using a production function approach. The analysis utilized  vessel  logbook  data  detailing  brown  shrimp  landings  by  individual  trip  during  the  period January 1999 to August 2006. The analysis of the two models was performed  using FRONTIER 4.1 and showed a reduction in fleet productivity of 14% following  the introduction of the legislation.  Conclusions

The  gear  measures  introduced  into  the  Crangon  beam  trawl  fisheries  have  largely  been  effective  although  the  introduction  of  derogations  for  some  fleets  has  reduced  the effectiveness. This has been a weakness in a number of technical measures regula‐ tions. This case study also demonstrates that a protocol used to evaluate the efficacy  of  these  technical  measures  in  the  C.  crangon  fisheries  is  both  holistic  and  effective.  The  same  protocol  can  potentially  be  used  elsewhere  in  other  fisheries  to  conduct  similar evaluations on the efficacy of technical measures.  References Catchpole, T. L., Revill, A. S., Innes, J., and Pascoe, S. 2008. Evaluating the efficacy of technical  measures:  a  case  study  of  selection  device  legislation  in  the  UK  Crangon  crangon  (brown  shrimp) fishery. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 65: 267–275.  ICES. 2007a. Report of the ICES‐FAO Working Group on Fish Technology and Fish Behaviour  (WGFTFB), 23–27 April 2007, Dublin, Ireland. ICES CM 2007/FTC:06. 197 pp.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 197

ICES.  2007b.  Report  of  the  ICES  Working  Group  on  Ecosystem  Effects  of  Fishing  Activities  (WGECO),  11–18  April,  2007,  ICES  Headquarters,  Copenhagen,  Denmark.  ICES  CM  2007/ACE:04. 162 pp.  ICES. 2007c. Report of the Working Group on Crangon Fisheries and Life History (WGCRAN),  22–24 May 2007, Helgoland, Germany. ICES CM 2007/LRC:08. 40 pp.  Polet, H. 2003. Evaluation of bycatch in the Belgian brown shrimp (Crangon Crangon L.) fishery  and of technical means to reduce discarding. Phd thesis, University of Ghent, Belgium.   Revill, A., Pascoe, S., Radcliffe, C., Riemann, S., Redant, F., Polet, H., Damm, U., Neudecker, T.,  Kristensen, P., and Jensen, D. 1999. The economic & biological consequences of discarding  in  the  European  Crangon  fisheries.  Final  report  to  the  European  Commission,  Contract  No. 97/SE/025.   Revill, A.S. 2001. Technical measures and the North Sea Crangon fisheries. Annex 11. In Evalua‐ tion  of  the  effectiveness  and  applicability  of  technical  measures  in  fisheries  management  (TECMES). Final Report (EU Study Contract no. 98/016). 

Case study 5 - Pelagic trawling for blue whiting, Faroe Islands Brief overview of the situation prior to mitigation measures/regulation

Blue  whiting  (Micromesistius  poutassou)  is  one  of  the  major  pelagic  fish  resources  in  the Northeast Atlantic. In 2004 the total recorded catch of blue whiting in the North  Atlantic  reached  2  377  569  t  mainly  taken  by  Norway,  EU  countries,  Iceland,  Faroe  Islands and Russia. The total blue whiting catch in the Faroese EEZ in 2004 was 435  000  t  (ICES,  2005).  It  is  thus  a  highly  valuable  fishery,  although  essentially  the  only  restrictions on this fishery have been in the form of quotas and mesh size.  In the last decade there have huge technical developments in pelagic fishing, both in  vessels  size  and  design,  as  well  as  in  development  of  trawl  design.  Today  pelagic  trawls  used  for  blue  whiting  have  horizontal  openings  of  200  m  wide  with  vertical  openings of 100 m encompassing meshes of 64 m in the mouth of the trawl gradually  tapering back to 32 mm in the cod‐end. These trawls have the ability to catch several  100 tonnes in a few minutes towing time using towing speed of 3–4 knots.  Drivers that initiated gear measures being introduced

In  recent  years  an  increasing  bycatch  of  demersal  species,  mainly  saithe  (Pollachius  virens)  and  to  a  lesser  degree  cod  (Gadus  morhua),  have  been  observed  in  the  blue  whiting fishery, particularly in the Faroese area. Preliminary findings at the Faroese  Fisheries Laboratory have shown that the average bycatch of saithe on one vessel in  November/December  2004  was  3.2%  in  weight  per  tow  (range  0%‐20%)  and  in  May/June  2005  2.2%  in  weight  per  tow  (range  0.6%‐14.9%)  (Lamhauge,  2004,  2005).  The  Faroese  Fisheries  Inspection  estimated  an  average  bycatch  in  Faroese  waters  to  be approximately 1% with Similar findings have been made in Icelandic waters (Páls‐ son, 2005). Given the catch sizes in this fishery, these bycatches leaves have the poten‐ tial to impact on saithe and cod stocks.   For the Faroese pelagic fishermen this bycatch was valueless as it could not be sorted  from the blue whiting catch so given the main problems were in Faroese waters there  was a strong motivation for them to look at ways of reducing saithe and cod catches  to  the  benefit  of  the  Faroese  demersal  fleets.  Saithe  is  an  important  stock  to  the  Faroese  fishing  fleet.  It  was  also  pointed  out  by  scientists  that  the  bycatch  was  a  source  of  an  unaccounted  mortally  in  the  stock  assessment  of  cod  and  saithe  in  the  area,  which  needed  to  be  addressed.  This  motivated  research  into  gear  mitigation  measures for this fishery.   

198 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Mitigation measures or gear changes tested

Experiments to introduce sorting grids for use in pelagic trawls to solve the bycatch  problem were undertaken in a joint project between the Faroese Fisheries Laboratory,  the Faroese Fisheries Ministry, the pelagic vessel owners and the Faroese gear manu‐ facturer “Vónin” Ltd. Since 2004 a range of rigid and flexible grids have been tested  to  reduce  the  bycatch.  Underwater  video  techniques  have  been  used  to  observe  the  function  of  different  grids.  The  original  rigid  steel  grids  tested,  of  similar  design  to  the successful Nordmore grid used in shrimp fisheries, could not withstand the huge  forces in play in these big trawls. There were also considerable problems with these  grids  becoming  blocked  with  blue  whiting  causing  handling  difficulties  and  loss  of  catch. Further testing led to the development of a compromise flexible grid made of  plastic  tubes  mounted  on  frame  ropes.  Preliminary  results  indicated  that  bycatch  could be reduced by more than 95% without losing more than 1% of the targeted fish  catch. Further testing provided these levels could be consistently achieved. More de‐ tails are given in Zachariassen and Thomsen (2007).  Management measures introduced after initial research and impact Assessment of the gear modifications

Following  this  research  on  the  1  January  2007  it  became  mandatory  for  the  Faroese  blue whiting fishery to use a sorting grid in Faroese waters where bycatch is an issue.  The type of sorting grid is not specified, but the bar spacing has to be 55mm. Accep‐ tance of this gear measure is reportedly high for the Faroese fishing industry and this  has largely been helped with a strong education campaign by the Faroese laboratory  in assisting fishermen with the installation and use of the grid. Grants for purchase  and installation costs have also been instigated. This strong collaboration between the  Faroese  fisheries  laboratory  and  the  Faroese  fishing  industry,  in  parallel  with  the  technical assistance provided has led to this high level of acceptance of adopting the  sorting grid. The request for this type of project came from the fishing industry, mo‐ tivating by an understanding that they needed to address the issue of saithe bycatch  or otherwise regulations such as closed areas or restricted catches would have been  imposed upon them. The Russian blue whiting fleet, however, did not adopt the sort‐ ing grid that well, although communication between the Faroese fisheries laboratory  and Russian vessels is ongoing.   Monitoring of the use of the grid has been intense and as part of the introduction of  the regulation the Faroese authorities have sought to assess the effectiveness of this  measure can through monitoring catches at sea and landings ashore. The monitoring  of the landings reflects whether bycatch levels have been reduced effectively and re‐ ports suggest this is the case. Any effects on saithe and cod stocks have not yet been  observed given the regulations have only been enforced for 18 months but this is be‐ ing closely monitored.  Conclusions

The introduction of the flexible grid into the blue whiting fishery shows how gear  measures properly researched with full industry support can work and what is really  interesting about this gear measure is that from inception to regulation took only a  year or so. The Faroese experience shows the importance of industry collaboration  but also the need for back up technical support and education of fishermen to en‐ courage acceptance. The adoption of this grid is perhaps paralleled to the introduc‐ tion of Turtle Excluder Devices in the US, South‐east Asia and Australia where  education programmes that have accompanied their introduction to advise fishermen 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 199

on correct installation and handling, as well as provision of back up technical assis‐ tance to solve rigging and handling problems that may have arisen.  References ICES.  2005.  Report  of  the  Northern  pelagic  and  blue  whiting  fisheries  Working  Group  (WGNPBW). ICES CM 2005 (ACFM:05), 241 pp.  Lamhauge, S. 2004. Hjáveiða í flótitroli. Faroese Fisheries Laboratory, Tórshavn. Faroe Islands  (In Faroese).  Lamhauge, S. 2005. Hjáveiða í flótitroli. Faroese Fisheries Laboratory, Tórshavn. Faroe Islands  (In Faroese).  Pálsson, O. K. 2005. An analysis of bycatch in the Icelandic blue whiting fishery. Fisheries Re‐ search, 73 (2005) 135–146).  Zachariassen, K., and Thomsen, B. 2007. Sorting grids in large blue‐whiting trawls. ICES Bos‐ ton Symposium ʺFishing Technology in the 21st Century”. ICES Journal of Marine Science  (in press). 

Conclusions The  integration  of  fishing  gear  technology  research  in  the  framework  for  fisheries  management  is  a  prerequisite  for  achieving  an  ecosystem‐based  approach.  It  is  rec‐ ommended that many of the issues evolving from the selected case studies should be  taken into account in a framework for assessing impacts and management measures  related to fishing gear based technical measures.  Fishing gear technologists tend to focus on single or multiple commercial fish species.  With the exception of charismatic species, very little fishing gear research is focused  on  non‐target  fish  species  and  benthic  invertebrates;  although  such  gear  modifica‐ tions  might  have  an  effect  on  non‐target  fish  and  invertebrate  species.  Most  of  the  fishing gear research is driven by the fisheries management objectives, which is in its  turn mainly driven by the healthiness of commercial fish stocks. There is gradually a  focus on a more ecosystem‐based approach, but very few fishing gear research is yet  focusing on other ecosystem components. Therefore there is need to consider biologi‐ cal  and  ecological  impacts  of  gear  measures  during  the  research  phase  and  before  inception into legislation.   Fisheries  gear  research  has  and  is  focusing  on  the  reduction  of  physical  habitat  im‐ pacts (e.g. EU‐project “DEGREE”), but few of these efforts have been implemented in  the actual fisheries and this is reflected in the fact that the authors could not identify a  good case study to address this.   Research  on  gear  modifications  to  improve  selectivity  of  commercial  fish  species  through a variety of sorting devices has been proven to reduce bycatch and discards  rates, mainly of fish species (Valdemarsen and Suuronen, 2003, Suuronen and Sarda,  2008).  The  application  of  these  gear  modifications  can  be  achieved  through  regula‐ tions or sometimes through the voluntary use by fishermen. Regulatory and market  incentives both can lead to an improvement of fishing practice.  From  the  case  studies, it  can  be  seen  that  communication and  education are  vitally,  when introducing gear based measure into legislation. Regulations are in some cases  quickly introduced, but it takes time for the fishing industry to adapt. Case study 5  (blue whiting fisheries and the use of a flexi‐grid) illustrates that the compliance and  acceptance of gear measures can be high, as a consequence of the involvement of the  Faroese fishing industry in the actual fishing gear research and the implementation of   

200 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

the legislation. The first case study (gill net fisheries and the use of pingers) however,  is  a  clear  illustration  where  the  very  limited  involvement  of  the  fishing  industry  in  the  development  of  Acoustic  Deterrent  Devices,  its  application  and  implementation  through  legislation  leads  to  much  scepticism  towards  its  use.  The  proven  positive  effects  of  acoustic  deterrent  devices  for  certain  cetacean  species  and  fisheries  have  been largely undermined and the measure has been ineffective in meeting its objec‐ tives.  Another  vital  aspect  for  an  effective  use  of  gear  modifications  is  a  good  framing  of  the legislation. There is a need to consider all relevant issues (e.g. practicalities, socio‐ economic and technical aspects, etc.) to ensure that gear measures, proven effective in  fishing gear research, meet their objectives after implementation.  Non‐regulatory  uptake  of  technical  gear  measures  can  be  achieved  through  several  incentives.  The  incentives  can  be  market‐driven,  but  uptake  leading  to  an  improve‐ ment of the fisheries image is also present. One example is the use of the benthos re‐ lease panel. In this case, the drivers are economic incentives and an improvement the  image  of  fisheries  towards  the  public  perception  and  supermarkets  (achieved  through e.g. the UK Clean fishing competition). The use of selective methods by fish‐ ermen in other cases is apparent, when fishermen face or are subjected to a reduction  in  fishing  opportunities  through  other  restrictive  measures  (e.g.  access  to  closed  ar‐ eas,  increase  in  fishing  days,  etc.).  This  has  been  apparent  in  the  adoption  of  the  Nordmore grid in Norwegian shrimp fisheries, where fishermen had to adopt more  selective gear to remain I the fishery (Graham et al., 2007).   WGFTFB conclude that the protocol used in the UK‐study (Catchpole et al., 2008) to  evaluate the legislation put into force for the C. crangon fisheries is both holistic and  effective.  The  same  protocol  can  potentially  be  used  elsewhere  in  other  fisheries  to  conduct  similar  evaluations  on  the  efficacy  of  technical  measures.  This  protocol  in‐ cludes  an  evaluation  of  the  legislation  text,  performance  of  the  gear  modifications,  including  environmental  effects  and  a  socio‐economic  evaluation.  This  can  be  sup‐ plemented  by  evaluating  the  efficacy  of  technical  measures  through  proper  use  of  data  gathered  under  the  Data  Collection  Regulation,  e.g.  Enever  et  al.  (submitted).  Data collection programmes can be used to evaluate the gear measures put into force.  However,  these  evaluations  have  to  be  used  in  association  with  survey  data,  to  document changes in discards and/or landings/catch.   COM. 2002. Communication from the commission to the council and the European parliament  on a Community Action Plan to reduce discards of fish. 22pp.  Suuronen,  P.,  and  Sarda,  F.  2007.  The  role  of  technical  measures  in  European  fisheries  man‐ agement and how to make them work better. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 751–756.  Valdemarsen, J.W., and Suuronen, P. 2003. Modifying fishing gear to achieve ecosystem objec‐ tives.  In:  Responsible  Fisheries  in  the  Marine  Ecosystem,  pp.  321–341.  Ed.  By  M.  Sinclair  and Valdimarsson, G. FAO, Rome and CABI International Publishing. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 201

Annex 12: Reports from National Coordinators of the FAO Project (REBYC 1) Philippines

Jonathan O. Dickson, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources,  [email protected]  Abstract The pilot implementation project was carried out in Samar Sea (Calbayog City) from  September 1, 2005 to December, 2006. The experiment involve 18 units of shrimp and  fish trawl fishing boats were used during the experiment with a total landed catch of  1,295 tons of fish from 991 fishing trips. The average catch per‐unit effort (CPUE) for  shrimp trawl (panghipon) was just below 1 ton (948 kgs) per fishing trip while CPUE  for  fish  trawl  (palupad)  was  2.4  tons  per  fishing  trip.  Fishing  season  (peak  months)  was  clearly  indicated  in  the  months  of  October  and  November  and  lean  season  in  July‐August.  Of  the  total  estimated  catch  of  711  tons  of  shrimp  trawl  for  the  study  period,  more  than one third (37.9%) was comprised of lizard fish (lizard fish, Saurida spp), followed  by nemipterids (Nemipterus hexodon, Scolopsis sp., 10%) and about 1% of shrimps. The  rejects, which comprised of the juveniles of commercially important species as well as  other small‐sized fish of low or no commercial value and commonly utilized as aqua‐ culture  feed,  was  15.6%.  The  composition  of  rejects  in  shrimp  trawl  indicated  high  incidence of juveniles of commercially important species, among which were the liz‐ ard  fish  8.1%  (Saurida  sp.),  purple  spotted  bigeye  5.4%  (Dilat,  Priacanthus  tayenus),  cardinalfish 9.2% (Muong, Apogon sp., hairtail (espada, Trichiurus sp.).  Shrimp trawl releasing efficiency on rejects/discard according the JTED type with V15  with the highest releasing efficiency of 59%. V10 with releasing efficiency of only 20%  was way below the set target of 40% was rejected during the 1st quarter of implemen‐ tation.  For  the  commercial  fish  catch  only  V15  indicated  a  reduction  of  10%, appar‐ ently  the  reason  fishermen  were  hesitant  in  using  the  device  during  the  trials.  H15  and V10  had  an  even indicated  increase  of 11%,  while V12 increased  by 5%. While,  fish trawl the releasing efficiency on the reject was more apparent on V12, V15 and  H15 with 54%, 58% and 46% respectively. Again V10 with 20% was below the thresh‐ old.  Interestingly,  the  commercial  catch  indicated  a  significant  increase  on  the  V15  with 66% higher catch and H15 likewise increase by 18%. Decrease was observes in  V10 and V12 with 23% and 3% respectively.  On  sex  and  maturity  of  Short  bodied  mackerel  and  nemipterids  species  has  a  good  data  in  terms  of  maturity.  The  Rastrelliger  kanagurta,  locally  known  in  Calbayog  as  Short bodied mackerel, showed that its longest average length appeared in April with  225mm  and  its  shortest  average  length  in  May.  The  result  on  the  average  length  is  directly proportional with the highest result on average Gonad Weight and Gonado  Somatic Index (GSI) appearing in April with 3.25 and 2.25 gms, respectively. Matured  samples were likewise observed in April, May and July. Matured samples were fur‐ ther observed in October and December. Most of the samples were however observed  in April which indicates that summer is the potential spawning season of this species.  While, nemipterids as it is locally known in the area showed that its longest average  length  appeared  in  August  with  179mm  and  its  shortest  average  length  in  May  (174mm).  With  regards  to  average  GSI,  December  showed  the  peak  with  1.91  fol‐  

202 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

lowed  by  September  and  October  with  1.89  and  1.90  respectively.  Similar  months  obviously  showed  the  same  trend  with  regards  to  average  gonad  weight.  The  monthly percentage composition from GSI which was practically based from the five  point maturity scale. Moreover, the majority of the samples gathered were immature  (stages I‐ III). Significant percentage of fully matured samples was observed through‐ out  the  sampling  period  with  December  showing  the  highest  followed  by  October  and July, September and November.  Introduction Trawl is one of the most efficient fishing methods to harvest bottom and mid‐water  fishery resources. It is considered, however, as a highly non‐selective gear due to the  fact that it exploits a wide variety of species in different sizes giving rise to problems  associated  with  managing  fish  stocks  and  maintaining  biodiversity.  Specifically,  the  high  proportion  of  small  juvenile  fish  in  the  catch  of  trawls  aggravates  the  current  serious  problems  of  overfishing  in  most  of  fishing  areas.  Catches  of  juveniles  and  other  non‐commercial  low‐value  species  in  large  portions  which  are  utilized  and  thrown  out  to  the  sea  as discards are deplorable  considering  the  current  overfished  state of coastal fishing grounds.   However, the effectiveness of contemporary measures regulating mesh size and area  of fishing ground restrictions has large been acknowledged to be impractical and in‐ adequate. Given that trawling is a major fishery and will likely remain an important  sector  in  countries  like  the  Philippines,  it  is  important  that  methods  or  devices  to  make it a more selective by reducing the incidence of juvenile and trash fish captured  are introduced in order.   Regulating mesh size and shape is a direct measure enforced for conservation of fish‐ ery  resources.  The  minimum  legal  stretched  mesh  size  is  not  less  than  3  centimetre  and above between two opposite knots of a full mesh when stretch (BFAR FAO No.  155, 1986). For trawl fisheries, the optimum mesh size is very difficult to obtain due to  high  diversity  of  catch.  Shrimps  may  represent  as  little  as  10%  of  the  total  catch  (Ramiscal,  1996)  which  also  happen  in  other  trawl  tropical  countries  (Seidel,  1975).  Likewise, the operation of trawl is also delimited by fishing ground restrictions. Un‐ der  the  Fisheries  Administrative  Order 201,  the  operation  of active  fishing  gears  in‐ cluding trawls is not permitted within the municipal waters or within 15 kilometres  from shore.  Trawl by and large remains an important source of food, income and employment to  a  significant  sector  in  the  fisheries  in  the  country.  In  1992–1995,  the  fishery  contrib‐ uted an average of 83,000 MT or 10% of the total commercial fisheries and 32,000 MT  or 4.3% of the municipal fisheries. Widespread trawl operations, mainly for shrimps  are known to exist in moderately deep inland seas, bays and other coastal areas, no‐ tably Visayan Sea, Samar Sea/Maqueda Bay, Lingayen Gulf, San Miguel Bay/ Polilio  and  Waters  of  Palawan.  Due  to  overfishing  problems  in  many  areas,  active  fishing  gears including trawls have been prohibited in municipal fishing grounds or within  15 km from the shoreline.  Several efforts have been made to introduce or study methods or devices to exclude  or  dissociate  juveniles  and  other  non‐target  or  unwanted  catch  from  the  target  of  commercially important species thereby reducing the impact to resources and biodi‐ versity.  Among  these  are  the  square  mesh  cod‐end  and  Bycatch  reduction  devices  (BRDs),  including  the  turtle  excluder  device  (TED)  and  juvenile  and  trash  fish  ex‐ cluder devices (JTEDs). JTEDs being promoted by the Southeast Asian Fisheries De‐  

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 203

velopment  Center  (SEAFDEC)  Training  Department  under  its  5‐year  ASEAN‐ SEAFDEC  Plan  of  responsible  fishing  technologies  and  practices.  Experiments  have  been carried out in most countries in Southeast Asian Region (Thailand, Brunei Da‐ russalam,  Vietnam,  Indonesia,  and  Malaysia)  where  encouraging  results  in  certain  designs have been indicated.   The project in the Philippines is parallel project to introduce and promote selectivity  devices to reduce the incidence of juveniles and trash fish and which can supplement  existing  management  measures  in  shrimp  trawl  fishery.  The  project  is  being  imple‐ mented in collaboration with FAO/UNEP/GEF, under Project EP/GLO/201/GEF enti‐ tled “Reduction of Environmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling Through  the Introduction of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and Change of Management”.  This paper covers the results of initial experiments conducted in Manila Bay, San Mi‐ guel Bay, Samar Sea, Visayan Sea and Lingayen Gulf, considered as the leading fish‐ ing grounds for shrimp trawl in the Philippines.   Methods 1. Duration and Scope

The  pilot  project  started  in  September  2005  involving  30  vessels  that  have  been  al‐ lowed  to  operate  under  the  Coastal  Zoning  Project;  however,  the  1st  quarter  re‐ view/evaluation  in  December  2005  necessitated  revision  of  the implementation  plan  to incorporate clear and expanded effort control system. The revised plan was subse‐ quently implemented starting April 2006 until December 2006. It involved 18 opera‐ tional vessels; each allowed 5 fishing trips per month (maximum of 3 fishing days per  trip)  instead  of  the  potential  7–8  fishing  trips  which  each  vessel  can  achieve  per  month. A dispatching system was devised for the departing vessels to acquire clear‐ ance from the City Agriculture Office.  In  January‐March  2006,  while  the  revised  pilot  project  was  awaiting  approval  from  concerned  parties,  the  catch  and  effort  was  likewise  monitored  even  while  the  fleet  was not using JTED.   2. JTED variations and deployment

Vertical sorting grids 10mm, 15mm (V10, V15) and horizontal sorting grid (H15) were  used  in  September  2005‐Decemeber  2005.  After  the  1st  quarter  evaluation  indicating  poor performance of V10, the working group recommend vertical sorting grid 12mm  (V12)  as  replacement,  thus  V12,  V15  and  H15  were  utilized  from  April‐June,  2005.  Subsequently  in  July‐December  2006,  only  V12  and  H15  were  utilized  to  V15  high  exclusion of commercial larger‐sized fish which became unacceptable to participating  fishermen.  Control  vessels  (no  JTED)  were  maintained  during  the  entire  study  pe‐ riod.  JTED  variations  and  control  were  alternated  and  deployed  on  rotation  basis  among  participating vessels (See appendixes for deployment pattern in Sept‐December 2005;  April‐June  2006;  July‐December  2006).  No  JTED  was  used  between  January‐March  2006 when the implementation of the pilot project was deferred.  3. Data gathering & sampling

a ) Fish landing survey/monitoring  Daily fish landing/unloading was conducted at Calbayog Fish Port. In September to  December  2005,  sampling  was  scheduled  every  two  days  and  subsequently  pro‐  

204 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

gressed daily sampling or total enumeration in the remaining period of implementa‐ tion. Data collected included total catch and species composition. Sub‐sampling was  done on dominant and commercially important species.  In order to determine the effect of the devices, the catch was classified according to  general grouping as follows:  •

Commercial  fish  –  all  fish  of  commercial  value  or  those  that  are  usually  sold;  and  further  sub‐grouped  as  large,  medium,  small  according  to  size  groups or classification used for wholesale pricing. 



Reject – catch that is sold as fish food in aquaculture. 

Size  grouping  (large,  medium,  small)  of  dominant  commercially  important  species  was also determined. Length measurements for dominant species were done.  On  a  particular  sampling day,  sampled  boats  were  selected in a  random  manner  as  much as possible, however, historically vessels with accommodating operators were  provided precedence to be able to gather more reliable information and execute the  designed sampling procedures. Two (2) pre‐designed forms are filled‐up in one sam‐ pling day.   For a particular sampled boat, the total boat catch (weight) was determined by count‐ ing the number of tubs and appropriately raised by the established weight per con‐ tainer  as  it  was  virtually  impossible  and  impractical  to  individually  weigh  their  contents. Normally, catch were usually landed pre‐sorted by species by the fishermen  onboard  to which  the  volume  was  recorded  for  that  species  and  in  instances where  sorting was done according to group, size or mixed species and trashfishes/rejects. In  cases of mixed species, the composition was determined by the sub‐sampling method  and  appropriately  raised  to  the  total  number  of  boxes  and  recorded  accordingly  in  prescribed form (Form 1).  In  case  of  mass  landing  and  total  sampling  is  unworkable,  the  total  boat  catch  and  fishing  effort  for  each  unsampled  boat  were  simply  inquired  from  masterfisherman  or the person in charge of catch disposal at the port and recorded in Form (2).  b ) Total landed catch and effort  On a regular sampling day, the total landed catch and effort of both sampled and un‐ sampled boats as well as the species composition of sampled boats are summarized.  The  catch  composition  of the  total landings  of  the  particular sampling  day is raised  according to the observed catch composition of the sampled boats. The catch‐per‐unit  effort (CPUE) was expressed as the kg/boat/trip.  c ) Length frequency  On any instance, sub‐sampling was randomly and proportionately undertaken from  fish tubs for length measurement of the species caught or in some instances, the ma‐ jor species and recorded in Form (2). The total length to the nearest cm was used as  the standard measurement in this project. After measuring, the frequencies are then  raised  according  to  the  total  catch  of  the  sampled  boats  and  subsequently  encoded  and analyzed via FiSAT Software. Moreover, the length frequency data were used in  the determination of some biological and population parameters such Length Infinity  (L∞), growth increment per (k) year using the ELEFAN 1 (k scan, response surface and  automatic search). The data was likewise used in analyzing the number of pulses (re‐ cruitment) per year per species. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 205

Moreover, these data obtained from the ELEFAN 1 were used in the estimation of F  (Fishing Mortality), M (Natural Mortality), Z (Total Mortality) and the E (Exploitation  Rate)  of  some  selected  species.  Consequently,  recruitment  patterns  determining  the  number of pulses or obtaining the plot showing the seasonal pattern of recruitment,  Probability of capture (25%; 50% and 75%).  d ) Gonad maturity  The examination of 50 samples/tails for the five major species in Calbayog City which  were taken from sampled boats every month was realized. Total Length, measured in  millimetre as well as body and gonad weight were determined which are rounded to  the nearest 0.1 grams were used in the determination of spawning month for the en‐ tire  study  period.  Sex  and  gonad  stage  were  determined  through  visual  inspection  using the standard 5‐point maturity scale respectively. These data are used in deter‐ mining the Gonado‐ Somatic Index (GSI) of the five major species which are used to  validate the spawning month of the selected species. Furthermore, the Gonad weight  multiplied  by  the  body  weight  and  100  was  the  key  in  determining  the  GSI  which  likewise  served  as  the  basis  in  the  determination  of  Length  at  first  maturity  of  the  sampled species through the practical method.  e ) Biomass estimation and catch‐per‐unit‐area (CPUA)  In determination of the Biomass and CPUA, data items recorded include the fishing  boat speed, wing spread of the gear, the coordinates, species composition by weight  and fishing effort (time) including the total Samar Sea Area. In principle, it appears  that a trawl sweeps a well defined path which is called the “swept area” or the “effec‐ tive path swept”. The swept area was estimated by using the formula a=D*hr*x2.  The CPUA was determined by dividing the catch by the swept area (in NM or square  kilometres.  Moreover,  the  biomass  was  determined  by  the  formula  where  B  is  the  Biomass,  Cw/a  is  the  mean  catch  per  unit  area,  A is  the  total  size  of  the  area under  study  and  X1  is  the  fraction  of  the  biomass  in  the  effective  path  swept  by  the  gear  which is actually retained in the gear. In recent studies, x1 ranges between 0.4 to 1.0.  In this study however, 0.5 was used which appears to be the most widely used value  in Asian survey activities.   

  As  per  recent  onboard  activities,  the  duration  of  each  haul averages  to  be  2.4 hours  for  Fish  Trawl  and 4.7  hours for  shrimp  trawls.  The  duration of  the  haul is  propor‐ tional  to  the  distance  covered  so  the  effort  has  no  direct  influence  on  the  catch  per  unit area (CPUA)  Onboard observation

Onboard observation was once a month starting April 2006 to monitor compliance to  JTED deployment. Biological data includes species and size composition. Dissection  to determine sex and maturity of major species caught was likewise conducted.   Logbook system

In an initial effort to determine the effect of the devices and pilot project scheme on  the operation and income, logbooks accomplished by owners of participating vessels 

 

206 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

were  evaluated.  Logbooks  entries  included  catch/production,  cost  of  operation  and  proceeds from sales.   Clearance/dispatching system

Participating vessels were required to secure a Clearance or Sailing Order from City  Agriculture Office (CAO) as a manner to enforce the devised effort control. Clearance  or  Sailing  Order  included  certification  of  inspection  of  JTED  and  specified  dates  of  departure and return to port.  Agencies involved and responsibilities

i )

Working Group  

The working group was organized as the steering and implementer of the pilot pro‐ ject.  Among  others,  its  responsibilities  were  to  plan,  coordinate  and  ensure  proper  implementation.  It  was  composed  of  representatives  of  LGU‐  Calbayog  City,  BFAR  CO Project Team, BFAR RFO8 /RFTC8, OPA‐Samar, CAFC, PAFC, APCO‐ Samar and  the  Fishing  Boat  Owners/Operators  of Calbayog  City.  Its  main  responsibilities  were  of the Pilot Project  ii )

Local government unit‐Calbayog City 

As  co‐project  implementer,  among  others,  the  responsibilities  of  the  LGU‐Calbayog  City  were  to  arrange  authorized/acceptable  implementation  among  local  stake‐ holders, to ensure participation of selected Commercial Fishing Boats (CFBs) in Cal‐ bayog City and complement in the enforcement of related laws/regulations  iii )

BFAR‐CO Project Team 

As co‐project implementer, the responsibilities of the BFAR‐CO Project Team were to  provide  financial  support  on  activities  supported  by  FAO/GEF  Project,  provide  JTEDs  to  be  used  and  technical  requirements  and  support  during  the  entire  imple‐ mentation of the project  iv )

Fishing boat operators and fishermen 

As  co‐operators,  the  boat  owners  and  crew  were  agreed  to  be  responsible  for  full  compliance  with  the  conditions  of  the  implementation  plan  including  provision  of  required data and allowing researchers/enumerators to join fishing trips.  v )

Periodic review/evaluation 

A quarterly review and evaluation spearheaded by the working group was agreed to  update concerned parties on the project implementation and address emerging issues  and concerns as a condition to the continued implementation of the pilot project.  Results Total catch and effort

For the period September 2005 to December 2006, the trawl fleet based in Calbayog  City landed a total catch of 1,295 tons of fish from 991 fishing trips. The average catch  per‐unit effort (CPUE) for shrimp trawl (panghipon) was just below 1 ton (948 kgs)  per  fishing  trip  while  CPUE  for  fish  trawl  (palupad)  was  2.4  tons  per  fishing  trip.  Fishing  season  (peak  months)  was  clearly  indicated  in  the  months  of  October  and  November and lean season in July‐August.  It  is  notable  that  fishing  effort  was  significantly  reduced  beginning  in  April  when  supplementary effort control was introduced.   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 207

Catch composition and seasonality

The total estimated catch of 711 tons of shrimp trawl for the study period, more than  one third (37.9%) was comprised of lizard fish (lizard fish, Saurida spp), followed by  nemipterids (Nemipterus hexodon, Scolopsis sp., 10%). Shrimps which are considered as  the target species formed just about 1% of the catch. The discards comprised of juve‐ niles of commercially important species, as well as other small‐sized fish of low or no  commercial value and commonly utilized as aquaculture feed was 15.6%.  The composition of discards in shrimp trawl indicated high incidence of juveniles of  commercially important species, among which were the lizard fish 8.1% (Saurida sp.),  purple  spotted  bigeye  5.4%  (Dilat,  Priacanthus  tayenus),  cardinalfish  9.2%  (Muong,  Apogon sp., hairtail (espada, Trichiurus sp.).   For  fish  trawls,  the  catch  was  dominated  by  small  pelagic  species  e.g.  roundscad  47.8%  (GG,  D.  maruadsi),  sardines  10.8%  (tamban,  Sardinella  longiceps)  and  mackerel  7.8% (short bodied mackerel, R. faughni). Demersal fish which are the dominant catch for  shrimp trawl constitute a small portion of the catch like lizardfish (lizard fish) 0.4%  and  threadfin  bream  0.3%.  The  reject  portion  of  the  catch  was  also  comparatively  lower, with only 4.2% of the total catch   JTED efficiency by catch grouping

TheV15  JTED  gave  the  highest  release  efficiency  with  59%  reduction  of  re‐ jects/discards. V10 with releasing efficiency of only 20% was way below the set target  of 40% was rejected during the 1st quarter of implementation for the commercial fish  catch. Only V15 indicated a reduction of 10%, apparently the reason fishermen were  hesitant in using the device during the trials. H15 and V10 had an even indicated in‐ crease of 11%, while V12 increased by 5%. In terms of total catch, V12 and V15 had an  overall reduction effect on the catch with 3.5% and 19.8% respectively.   For  fish  trawl,  the release efficiency for  rejects  was more  apparent  on  V12, V15  and  H15 with 54%, 58% and 46% respectively. Again V10 with 20% was below the thresh‐ old.  Interestingly,  the  commercial  catch  indicated  a  significant  increase  on  the  V15  with 66% higher catch and H15 likewise increase by 18%. Decreases were observed in  V10 and V12 with 23% and 3% respectively, and the total catch, V12 showed a signifi‐ cant increase in catch with 58% increase as compared to control net. H15 increased by  4% while there was a decrease in V10 and V12 with 23% and 6% respectively. It was  surmised that the increase in V15 and H15 was attributed to less drag due to release  of smaller fish and less masking on the codend.  Potential effect of JTED utilization on catch and income

To be able to demonstrate the potential impact of the devices on the catch and income  on shrimp trawl, a simple projection is shown in Table 1 as computed based on the  following:  •

Total fishing effort = total fishing effort made by the shrimp trawls in 2006=  455 trips 



Total catch = average NOJ catch rate = 930.15 kgs/trip 



Catch  composition  =  NOJ  composition  (reject,  commercial‐further  classi‐ fied into small, medium, large) 



Reduction/ increase 



Reject = Average reject reduction / increase by JTED type 

 

208 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Large commercial = average large commercial reduction/increase on lizard  fish by JTED type 



Medium commercial = average medium commercial reduction/increase on  lizard fish by JTED type 



Small commercial = average small commercial reduction/increase on lizard  fish by JTED type 



Weight increase of small commercial fish = 3 times in 6 months period 



Average price (pesos) 



Large commercial = 60 



Medium commercial = 40 



Small commercial = 30 



Reject = 5 

Table 1. Projections of loss or gain from released juveniles and discards from catch.  NQJ

v10

v12

v15

h15

Income from large fish 

11,964,015 

8,500,135 

19,169,717 

11,179,643 

14,290,961 

Income from medium fish 

3,214,394 

3,273,203 

2,360,645 

2,410,188 

2,767,419 

Income from small fish 

1,648,777 

2,297,024 

1,081,611 

602,547 

1,249,731 

Income from rejects 

442,504 

353,134 

275,767 

183,612 

257,351 

Total Income 

17,269,690 

14,423,496 

22,887,739 

14,375,990 

18,566,462 

Loss/Gain of income from large  fish 

 

3,463,880 

(7,205,701) 

784,372 

(2,326,946) 

Loss/Gain of income from  medium fish 

 

(58,809) 

853,749 

804,206 

446,975 

Loss/Gain of income from small  fish 

 

(648,247) 

567,166 

1,046,230 

399,046 

Total loss of income 

 

89,371 

166,738 

258,892 

185,153 

Potential value of escaped small  fish 

 

 

3,402,988 

6,277,381 

2,394,276 

Potential value of escaped reject  commercial fish 

 

804,336 

1,500,639 

8,607,409 

1,666,381 

Total potential increase in  income 

 

804,336 

4,903,637 

8,607,409 

4,060,657 

Potential production from small  fish 

 

 

56,717 

104,623 

39,905 

Potential production escaped  reject commercial fish (25%) 

 

13,406 

25,011 

38,834 

27,773 

Total potential increase in  production 

 

13,406 

81,727 

143,457 

67,678 

Based on the above the following total catch by JTED type was estimated:  Sex and maturity

Rastrelliger  kanagurta,  locally  known  in  Calbayog  as  Short  bodied  mackerel,  showed  that its longest average length appeared in April with 225mm and its shortest average  length  in  May.  The  result  on  the  average  length  is  directly  proportional  with  the  highest  result  on  average  Gonad  Weight  and  GSI  appearing  in  April  with  3.25  and  2.25 gms respectively.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 209

The monthly percentage composition from GSI, which was practically based from the  five  point  maturity  scale.  Sample  GSIs  were  classified  according  to  gonad  weight  where stages 4 and 5 were classified as fully matured while stages 1, 2 and 3 were as  it  is.  Majority  of  the  samples  gathered  were  immature  while  a  percent  of  fully  ma‐ tured samples were observed from April to December except June where there were  no samples gathered.  The percent maturity of samples based from practical determination of maturity from  GSI of 4. It further shows that a very significant portion of catch weighed less than 0  GSIs,  with  majority  caught  in  May.  Matured  samples  were  likewise  observed  in  April, May and July. Matured samples were further observed in October and Decem‐ ber. Most of the samples were however observed in April which indicates that sum‐ mer is the potential spawning season of this species.   The  male  and  female  catch  maturity  per  month  of  short  bodied  mackerel.  It  shows  that  MI  and  FI  Short  bodied  mackerel are  the  most  dominant  through  out  the  sam‐ pling period followed by MII and MIII. Matured Male (MIV, MV) and Female (FIV,  FV)  Short  bodied  mackerel  are  observed  to  be  significantly  few.  However,  FV  and  MV are observed to be abundant in July (14n) and April (7n) respectively.  Based from the practical determination of samples through the GSI limit of 4, it was  observed  that  majority  of  the  male  and  female  of  this  species  appeared  immature  through‐ out the pilot project period with a minimal number of matured female ap‐ pearing in April and May as well as in December. May, October and December is the  appearance of insignificant number of male species.  The figures above both show that most of the catch during the entire sampling period  were  sexually  immature  with  the  majority  appearing  in  the  months  of  July  to  Sep‐ tember. Significant number of sexually matured Short bodied mackerel was observed  during  the  summer  months  and  also  in  the  last  quarter  which  further  validates  re‐ lated above figure that these times of the year are their spawning period.  For nemipterids species in Calbayog city showed that its longest average length ap‐ peared in August with 179mm and its shortest average length in May (174mm). With  regards to average GSI, December showed the peak with 1.91 followed by September  and  October  with  1.89  and  1.90  respectively.  Similar  months  obviously  showed  the  same trend with regards to average gonad weight.  The  majority  of  the  samples  gathered  were  immature  (stages  I‐  III).  Significant  per‐ centage of fully matured samples was observed throughout the sampling period with  December  showing  the  highest  followed  by  October  and  July,  September  and  No‐ vember.  Lessons Learned



Affect in some of fishermen in the short term? 



Discuss what Juvenile and Trashfish Excluder Devices (JTEDs) design has  the highest releasing efficiency? 

Future Plans



Demonstration and pilot trials of Suripera 



Policy formulation on the use of Juvenile and Trashfish Excluder Devices  (JTEDs) in commercial and small‐scale trawl fisheries 



Consultations with various stakeholders affected by the policy 

 

210 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Presentation  and  justification  of  the  policy  to  the  National  Fisheries  and  Aquatic Resource Management Council (NFARMC) for approval  



Assessment, review and evaluation on the implementation of the policy 



Support to local government units for the management of coastal fisheries  resources through responsible fishing operations and practices 

References Chokesanguan, B, S. Ananpongsuk, S. Siriraksohpon and L. Podapol. 2000. Study on Juvenile  and Trash Fish Excluder Devices (JTEDs) in Thailand. SEAFDEC‐TD/RES/47.  Chokesanguan, B, S. Ananpongsuk, S. Siriraksohpon and I. Abdul Hamid. 2001. Study on Ju‐ venile and Trash Fish Excluder Devices (JTEDs) in v Darussalam. SEAFDEC‐TD/RES/47.  Chokesanguan, B, S. Ananpongsuk, S. Siriraksohpon, W. Wanchana and N. Long. 2002. Study  on Juvenile and Trash Fish Excluder Devices (JTEDs) in Vietnam. SEAFDEC‐TD/RES/.  Chokesanguan, B, S. Ananpongsuk, et al. 2002. Study on Juvenile and Trash Fish Excluder De‐ vices (JTEDs) in Malaysia. SEAFDEC‐TD/RES/.  Chokesanguan,  B,  S.  Ananpongsuk,  I.  Chanrachakij,  N.  Manajit  and  G.  Tampubolon.  2002.  Study  on  Juvenile  and  Trash  Fish  Excluder  Devices  (JTEDs)  in  Indonesia.  SEAFDEC‐ TD/RES/.  Del Mundo, C., Agasen, E., and Ricablanca, T. 1990. The Marine Shrimp Resources of Luzon.  The Philippine Journal of Fisheries, Vol. 21, pp. 45–66.   Dickson, J., R. Ramiscal, B. Magno, N. Lamarca, M. Chiuco and A. Santiago III. 1997 (unpub‐ lished). Experiments on Turtle Excluding Devices (TEDs). BFAR, Quezon City.  Ingles,  J.,  and  Aprieto,  V.  1983.  A  contribution  to  the  Biology  of  Penaeid  Shrimps  in  the  Visayan Sea. Fish. Res. J. Philipp. Vol.8, No.2 pp. 19–31.  Meemeskul,  Y.  1988. Effects  of  a  Partial  Increase  of  Mesh Size  in  the  Multispecies  and  Multi‐ fleet Demersal Fisheries in the Gulf of Thailand. FAO Fisheries Report 389.  Pope,  J.A.,  et.al.  1969.  Manual  of  Methods  for  Fish  Stock  Assessment.  FAO  Fish.  Tech.  Paper  No. 41. p.4  Ramiscal, R., B. Magno, M. Chiuco and A. Santiago III. 1996 (unpublished). Shrimp Selectivity  Study using Separator Panel in Manila Bay. BFAR, Quezon City.  Seidel, W.R. 1975. A shrimp separator trawl for the southeast fisheries. Proc. Gulf Caribb. Fish.  Inst., 27:66–76.   Sinoda, M., S.M. Tan, Y. Watanabe and Y. Meemeskul. 1979. A method for estimating the best  cod end mesh size in the South China Sea area. Bull. Choshi. Mar. Lab. 11:65–80.   Tokai, T. 1997. Methodology of Evaluating Selectivity Performance – Two Selective Process of  Trawl Sorting Devices: Fish Encountering and being Sieved. Paper presented to Regional  Workshop on Responsible Fishing, SEAFDEC, Thailand, p.242–249.  Wardle, C.S. 1983. Fish reactions toward fishing gears, experimental biology at sea. A G Mac‐ donald and C G Priede (eds). London, Academic Press, 167–95 pp. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 211

Thailand Bundit CHOKESANGUAN, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center/  Training Department (SEAFDEC/TD),Post Box 97, Phrasamut‐chedi, Samut‐ prakan, 10290, Thailand [Tel:+66 2 4256120, fax:+66 2 4256110–11, e‐mail:  [email protected]]  Abstract The  promotion  and  experimental  fishing  trials  on  the  escapement  of  juveniles  and  trash fish from the trawl fishing gear using JTEDs in Southeast Asian waters was im‐ plemented in the national waters off Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Ma‐ laysia,  the  Philippines,  Thailand,  Vietnam  and  Myanmar.  In  order  to  continually  build up the resource user’s awareness, there were some workshop/seminar/training  courses  conduction,  and  information  dissemination  to  the  public  through  web‐ sites,VCD  and  publications.  There  were  two  main  types  of  technical  evaluation  of  JTEDs  demonstration  and  promotion  were  carried  out;  1)  the  scientific  data  collec‐ tion, the result and its interpretation was used for further modification of the divide.  2)  The  awareness  and  capacity  building  evaluation  by  using  questionnaires  and  dockside  interview.  Base  on  situation  and  lesson  learned  from  the  past,  there  are  some future plans to emphasize in research, development and promotion on the use  of  selective  fishing  gears  and  devices  for  reduced  discards  and  bycatch  of  juvenile  and trash in the region.  Introduction The people in the Southeast Asian Region have greatly and historically depended on  the fish in their diet. Therefore, fisheries can not be replaced by an alternate system to  secure  protein  in  food  including  livestock  products.  In  this  connection,  the  fisheries  sector  as  a  whole  has  been  developed  into  a  traditional  and  complex  system  com‐ pared with any other part of the world except the Far East. The Southeast Asia Coun‐ tries are located in the tropical zone, fisheries resources are of comparatively multi‐ species composition especially in demersal stocks. In addition, dominant species do  not compose the majority of catch, as in the fisheries in the Temperate Zone (domi‐ nant  species  compose  70–80%  of  the  catch  in  the  Temperate  Zone;  those  of  tropical  fisheries  compose  20–30%  of  the  catch.).  It  has  been  recognized  that  there  are  big  amount  of  bycatch  are  discarded  from  commercial  fisheries  especially  shrimp  and  fish trawling which due to the poor selectivity of the fine‐meshed nets. Moreover, the  incidental catch of juvenile and trash fish is acknowledged as an important adjunct to  fisheries management. Recently, this aspect has developed to a major issue in fisher‐ ies  management,  attributed  to  an  increasing  demand  for  fisheries  resources  and  a  growing  recognition  of  the  need  to ensure  that  fisheries  are  conducted  in  a  sustain‐ able manner.   Methods In the development of sustainable fisheries, reducing the incidental catch of juvenile  and trash fish is a key priority. In responsible to this, the Training Department (TD)  of  the  Southeast  Asian  Fisheries  Development  Center  (SEAFDEC)  initiated  research  in 1998 to provide a technical foundation for the development and adoption of Juve‐ nile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  (JTEDs)  in  regional  trawl  fisheries.  The  promotion  and experimental fishing trials on the escapement of juveniles and trash fish from the 

 

212 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

trawl  fishing  gear  using  JTEDs  in  Southeast  Asian  waters  was  implemented  in  the  national  waters  off  Brunei  Darussalam,  Cambodia,  Indonesia,  Malaysia,  the  Philip‐ pines, Thailand, Vietnam and Myanmar. Moreover, in order to continually build up  the  resource  user’s  awareness,  there  were  some  workshop/seminar/training  courses  conduction,  and  information  dissemination  to  the  public  through  web‐sites  and  the  local  people  in  each  countries  through  VCD  and  publications  such  as  poster,  book‐ lets, cartoon books, stickers, etc and TD have been provided information through the  web‐site.   There were two main types of technical evaluation of JTEDs were carried out:  •

The  scientific  data  collection,  each  time  of  the  experiment  in  each  men‐ tioned country names, various kinds of JTEDs in different design and size  of  the  grid  interval  were  used  in  the  experiments  in  order  to  make  the  comparison on their effective performance in maximizing the juvenile es‐ capement while minimizing the loss of the commercial or the target catch.  Base  on  the  results  analysis  and  the  interpretation  of  the  collected  data  from each fishing ground and each country, the best performance from the  research was used for further modification for the better performance. 



The  awareness  and  capacity  building  evaluation  by  using  questionnaires  and  dockside  interview.  The  evaluation  process  was  carried  out  in  each  area/country. 

Results of the implementation and promotion on the use of JTEDs in Southeast Asia

Brunei  Darussalam,  JTED was introduced  and  experiment  in 2000  and 2002.  The  51  mm  square‐mesh  experiment  gives  better  result  than  the  rigid  sorting  grid  type  in  term of releasing the unwanted portion of the catch in this country.   Cambodia, in 2004, the Department of Fisheries had closed cooperation with SEAF‐ DEC/TD for training at Sihanouk Ville. The training was focused on the theory on the  used of JTEDs and practice on installation of JTEDs devices.   Indonesia: JTEDs promotion and demonstration were carried out many times in In‐ donesia. They have found that the JTED Semi‐curve rigid sorting grid with 1.5 cm of  grid interval is most applicable for the fish trawl in their country. And Indonesia will  focus on the technology modification of JTEDs construction, mesh figure (diamond or  square).  Malaysia:  The  experiment  was  conducted  at  Kedah  water  to  compare  the  effective‐ ness  of  fishermen  net  The  results  found  that  the  38  mm  at  cod‐end  can  be  improve  the selectivity of gear and not reduce the rate of commercial catch.   Myanmar: The JTEDs can be applied to use for both fish and shrimp trawls, specially  the  window  type  JTED  with  1  cm  of  bar  spacing.  But  most  of  the  fishermen  do  not  want to loss their profit. So that they still do not use it in their trawls.   The  Philippines:  Training/demonstrations  and  sea  trials  of  JTEDs  were  done  in  the  major  trawling  ground  of  the  country:  Manila  Bay,  San  Miguel  bay,  Lingayen  Gulf,  Visayan Sea and Maqueda bay/ Samar Sea. The JTED pilot project was proposed to  the local government unit of Calbayog City to complement the ongoing Coastal Zon‐ ing Program in which locally based commercial fishing boats including trawlers were  allocated  to  operate  a  specific  area. Not  only  seminar,  experiments  to  find  the  most  applicable design of the device but the activities and promotion of by catch reduction  technologies were also broadcast through the local radio station in Daet, Camarines  Norte.    

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 213

Thailand: JTEDs experiments and promotions in the Gulf of Thailand water. The ex‐ periments and the promotions led to the identification of the Rigid Sorting Grid De‐ vices  as  an  effective  tool  in  order  to  release  the  juvenile  and  trash  from  the  trawl  fishing. The technical report and techniques were transferred to DOF however it also  depends on the national policy in order to further continue the JTEDs promotion in  Thailand.  Vietnam: The experiment of JTEDs on shrimp trawler was carried out in the Gulf of  Tonkin. Vietnam continues to do the research and experiments by using square mesh  of  20,25,30,35  and  40  mm  and  iron  frame  for  comparison.  The  result  found  that  the  square mesh with 20 mm give the best performance on gear selectivity specially for  squid,  lizard  fish  and  cuttlefish  and  economic  advantage  while  Iron  frame  with  12  and 20 mm is suitable for croaker and lizard fish group.    Lesson learned Designs and Experiments



Existing  types  and  designs  of  JTEDs  are  not  appropriate  /  applicable  in  some geo‐graphical areas and species composition that require some adap‐ tation/modification. 



High cost of JTEDs (Sorting Grids) particularly in small‐scale trawl fisher‐ ies and it needs further research on more viable designs/type of JTEDs.  



Insufficient  government  support  in  research  and  development  on  the  de‐ vices. 

Fishers’ perceptions/attitudes/concerns on adoption of JTEDs



High demand for trash fish such as for feeds for aquaculture. 



Inconvenient operation of the gear equipped with the devices i.e. net haul‐ ing. 



Reduction  of  total  catch  which  it  may  be  due  to  the  design  and  fishing  method of JTEDs use in some areas. 



Higher cost of operation for the fuel oil use during towing. 

Awareness Building and Extension Activities



Limited  awareness  building  and  capacity  building  activities  for  fishers  to  support the implementation. 



Convincing power of the studies/experiments’ results to fishers – this may  be due to the manner that fishers are involved in the conduct of such stud‐ ies/experiments.  

Promotion and Adoption Strategies



Linkages between JTEDs and management in several countries. 



Enabling environment/incentives for adoption of such devices by fishers. 



Clear evidence on the escapement of fish as it’s can sustain the resources. 

Future Plans

Base  on  situation  and  lesson  learned  from  the  past,  there  are  some  future  plans  to  emphasized in research, development and promotion on the use of selective fishing  gears  and  devices  for  reduced  discards  and  bycatch  of  juvenile  and  trash  in  the  re‐ gion including.   

214 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Promotion  on  the  use  of  selective  fishing  gears  and  selective  devices  as  well as Awareness/capacity building in some selected areas should be con‐ tinued. Two main target groups need to be focused – fishers for their un‐ derstanding,  cooperation  and  compliance,  and  policy‐makers  for  understanding  on  linkages  with  broader  management  and  supports.  The  information dissemination can be done by workshop, exhibition, publica‐ tion and multi media. 



Research and study of the assessment of impacts of various kinds of fish‐ ing  gear  and  practice  on  fisheries  resources,  sea  beds,  environment  and  ecosystem through impacts of light fishing on fisheries resources in South‐ east Asia and impacts of bottom trawl net, dredges, traps and other need  to be continued study. Further more the exited device as JTEDs need fur‐ ther adaptation for better efficiency performance and lesser cost of towing  operation. 



Interaction between threatened species of international concern and fisher‐ ies and participation of international meetings for information exchange on  interaction  of  endangered  species  and  fisheries  is  one  of  activities  in  this  project. 

The promotion of responsible trawl fishing practices in Southeast Asia through the introduction of Juvenile and Trash Excluder Devices (JTEDs) Abstract The  demonstrations  and  experiments  on  the  use  of  JTEDs  were  conducted  in  Thai‐ land,  Brunei  Darussalam,  Vietnam,  Malaysia,  the  Philippines,  Indonesia  and  Myan‐ mar.  Aside  from  the  main  aim  on  the  introduction  of  the  devices  to  member  countries, the research was also carried out to develop adjust and modify for the best  performance  of  the  Juvenile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  (JTEDs).  Various  kinds  of  JTEDs were used in the experiment; there are Rigid Sorting Grid, Rectangular shaped  window and Semi‐curved window with different grid intervals for each device. The  results  show  that  each  type  and  design  of  JTEDs  gave  different  performance  on  es‐ capement  rate  of  juvenile and  commercial  catch.  The  escapement rates ranged from  56.69–77% for juveniles and 9.72–47.31% for the commercial or target catch. Further‐ more the estimated selection curve of fish length was also considered. Based on this  experiment the Rigid Sorting Grid with 1.2 and 2 cm grid intervals gave better per‐ formance than other devices in maximizing the juvenile escapement while minimiz‐ ing the loss of commercial or target catch. The mean total length (TL) paralleled to the  size of the grid interval. It is recommended that the Rigid Sorting Grid with 1.2 and 2  cm grid intervals is appropriate to recommend to the region. However, other impor‐ tance factors such as the fishing ground, kind and size of target catch in each country  have to be well considered.  Keywords:  escapement,  juvenile  devices,  JTEDs,  performance,  rectangular  window,  rigid sorting grid, selection, semi‐curved window, Southeast Asia, trawl.  Introduction The incidental catch of juvenile and trash fish is acknowledged as an important ad‐ junct to fisheries management. Recently, this aspect has developed to a major issue in  fisheries management, attributed to an increasing demand for fisheries resources and  a growing recognition of the need to ensure that fisheries are conducted in a sustain‐ able  manner.  Once  considered  mostly  as  a  nuisance,  the  catch  of  juvenile  and  trash   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 215

fish are now recognized as having a detrimental impact on the fecundity of fisheries  systems. Similarly, the economic value of the catch of juveniles of commercially im‐ portant species are now viewed as being considerably lower than those for the same  species at sizes more suited for the market.   In the development of sustainable fisheries, reducing the incidental catch of juvenile  and trash fish is a key priority. In response to this, the Training Department (TD) of  the  Southeast  Asian  Fisheries  Development  Center  (SEAFDEC)  initiated  research  in  1998 to provide a technical foundation for the development and adoption of Juvenile  and Trash Excluder Devices (JTEDs) in regional trawl fisheries.  At  first,  two  JTED  types  were  developed  for  installation  into  the  upper  part  of  the  cod‐end.  One  device  used  a  rectangular  shaped  window,  whilst  the  other  a  semi‐ curved window. The frames of both were constructed using stainless steel frames of  80  by  100cm,  with  “soft”  vertical  separator  gratings  made  of  8  mm.  polyethylene  rope.   The general effectiveness of those JTED types was tested during at‐sea fishing trials  and  demonstrations.  Those  designs  have  since  been  modified  in  response  to  more  detailed testing on their efficacy influenced by various factors including the separator  spacing, “soft”  versus  “hard” separator gratings,  and  the  use  of  square  mesh in  the  cod‐end as opposed to diamond mesh. Investigations were conducted on the effect of  trawl towing speed, catch loading and hydrodynamic drag on deformation of trawl  netting and the ultimate performance of JTEDs, Those tests provided TD researchers  with an insight on the operational considerations required to maximize the exclusion  of juvenile and trash fish from the trawl fishing gear.  Since  1998,  TD  has  completed  numerous  experimental  fishing  trials  on  the  escape‐ ment of juveniles and trash fish from the trawl fishing gear using JTEDs in Southeast  Asian  waters.  Work  has  been  completed  in  the  national  waters  off  Brunei  Darussa‐ lam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Myanmar.  Materials and methods Study  areas:  Experiments  were  carried  out  in  the  Prachub  Kirikan  and  Chumporn  provinces in the Gulf of Thailand, the Northern part of Brunei Darussalam, the gulf  of  Tonkin  in  Vietnam,  off  Alor  Setar  in  Malaysia,  Arafura  Sea  in  Indonesia,  Manila  Bay in the Philippines and Thandwe town Myanmar.   Types  and  Designs  of  JTEDs:  The  experiments  on  the  performance  of  JTEDs  was  conducted in different countries using different type and design in each study sites,  Once the experiments were done, the adjustment and modification of JTEDs designs  will be made in order to maximizing the juvenile escapement while minimizing the  escape  of  commercial  or  target  catch.  The  usual  grid  separator  system  consists  of  grids, a fish outlet and a funnel which guides fish and shrimp against the grid, (Tokai  T at al., 1996). The types of JTEDs experimented in each country are: Thailand‐ Rec‐ tangular shaped window with four grid intervals of 8, 12, 16, and 24 cm, Semi‐curved  window  with  4,  6  and  8  cm  grid  intervals.  Brunei  Darussalam‐  Rigid  Sorting  Grid  with 1, 2 and 3 cm grid intervals, Semi‐curved window and Rectangular shaped win‐ dow with 1 cm grid interval. Vietnam‐ Rigid Sorting Grid with 2, 3 and 4 cm grid in‐ tervals.  Malaysia‐  Rigid  Sorting  Grid  with  1.2  and  2  cm  grid  intervals.  Indonesia‐  Rigid Sorting Grid, Rectangular shaped window and Semi‐curved window with 4 cm  grid interval for all types. The Philippines‐ Rigid Sorting Grid with 1, 2 and 3 cm grid  interval, Rectangular shaped window and Semi‐curved with both 1 cm grid interval. 

 

216 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Myanmar‐ Rigid Sorting Grid with 1, 2 and 3 cm grid intervals, Semi‐curved window  and Rectangular shaped window with 1 cm grid interval.  Fishing operation

Each type and design of JTEDs was installed individually on fish trawler. The cover  net  was  used  to  collect  samples  of  the  catch  escapement.  Fishing  operations  were  scheduled and carried out during both day and night times with an hour of towing,  each size of grid interval designs was tested for 5–9 times in fishing operation.  The catch categorization

The  catch  of  each  haul  from  both  cod‐end  and  cover  net  was  sorted  mainly  into  2  main  groups;  commercial  or  target  catch  and  juvenile  including  trash  groups.  The  samples  taken  randomly  from  each  group  were  determined  for  their  individual  weighed total length (TL) and body width (BW) in cm. The catch of each group was  also weighed for calculation of CPUE and percentage of escapement rate.  Data Analysis

Rate of escapement: In order to consider the most appropriate performance of JTEDs,  the important factors which need to be considered are the rate of escapement of juve‐ niles  including  trash  fish and  the  commercial  catch. The  purpose of  the  device  is  to  maximize the catch of juvenile and trash fish while minimize the rate of escapement  for the commercial and target group:   The rate of escapement was calculated by using the following equation:  E = (Wcn/(Wcn+Wce))*100  Where E = Escapement rate by weight in %  Wcn = Catch in cover net (gm)  Wce = Catch in cod‐end (gm)  Selectivity

The estimate of trawl net selectivity curve was determined using a linear model. This  method is the most commonly used by comparing the length compositions of the fish  remaining in the cod‐end and in the cover net, the probability of escape through the  large  mesh  net  can  be  estimated,  (Pope  et  al.,1975,  Jones,  1976,  Kimura,  1977  and  Mastawee and Theparoonrat, 2002) .  Linear model:   

Trawl selection curve was approximated by the following equation.  S=1/{1+exp(a+b*l} 

(2) 

 

Where, l is the total length of the fish and a and b are constants. 

 

The log equation is linearizes the relationship.  Ln(1/S‐1)=a+b*∫  In this model, the parameter is estimated by minimizing the following  n  ∑[ln{(1/S)‐1}‐(a+b*l]2  i=1 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 217

From equation 4, the regression coefficient “b” is obtained as.  b= ∑ [(l‐l)(Y‐Y)]/ ∑(l‐l)2  Where y = ln[(1/S)‐1], and y is average. The intercept “a” is calculated by the follow‐ ing equation.  a= y‐bl  Results and discussion 1 ) CPUE comparison  The CPUE among different countries ranged from 8.45 to 283.27 kg/hr. The re‐ sults show that the CPUE from Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Myanmar, Ma‐ laysia, Thailand, Philippines, and Vietnam was 283.27, 99.75, 86.03, 35.81, 21.2,  14.7, and 8.45 kg/hr respectively. The highest one was found in Brunei Darus‐ salam,  which  indicates  that  the  fisheries  resources  at  the  experiment  site  in  Brunei Darussalam are still very rich compared to sites in other countries.   2 ) Rate of escapement  The relative mean escapement rates according to JTEDs types from each study  sites are shown in Figures 1–7.    Experiment on type of JTEDs in Vietnam

70

Escapement Rate (%)

Escapement Rate (%)

Experiment on types of JTEDs in Thailand

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 R ec .8

R ec .12

R ec .16

R ec .24

Semi. 4

Semi. 6

Semi. 8

Design of J TEDs

30 25 20 15 10 5 0 R S2

Semi.12

Juv.&tras h

Figure 1. Mean escapement rate, Thailand. 

Juv.&trash

 

Figure 2. Mean escapement rate, Vietnam. 

Escapement Rate (%)

Escapement Rate (%)

80 60 40 20 0 R S3

Design of JTEDs

R ec .1

Com. group

Experiment on type of JTEDs in Malaysia

100

R S2

R S4

  

Experiment on types JTEDs in Philippines

R S1

R S3

Design of JTEDs

Com. group

Semi.1 Com. group J uv .&trash

100 80 60 40 20 0 R S1.2

R S2

Design of JTEDs

Com. group Juv.&tras h

 

Figure 3. Mean escapement rate, Philippines. 

Figure 4. Mean escapement rate, Malaysia. 

 

218 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Experiment on type of JTEDs in Indonesia E scapement Rate (%)

Escapement Rate (%)

Experiment on type of JTEDss in Brunei 100 80 60 40 20 0 R S1

R S2

R S3

Semi.1

R ec .1

Design of JTEDs

100 80 60 40 20 0 R S4

Semi.4

Com. group

R ec .4 Com. group

Design of JTEDs

Juv.&trash

Juv.&trash

 

Figure 5. Mean escapement rate, Brunei. 

Figure 6. Mean escapement rate, Indonesia. 

EXperiment on type of JTEDs in Myanmar Different of escapemt rate

Escapement Rate (%)

30 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 RS 1

RS 2

RS 3

S emi.1

R ec.1

25 20 15 10 5 0 RS1

Design of JTEDs

Com. group

RS1.2

RS2

RS3

Rec.4

Semi.1

Designs of JTEDs

Juv.&trash

 

Figure 7. Mean escapement rate, Myanmar. 

Figure 8. Escapement rates among various devices. 

The rate of escapement calculated by weight of escaped animals from different type  of JTEDs and different size of grid interval, the appropriate device should release as  much as possible the juvenile and trash fish while reduce the escapement of the target  catch.  The  results  show  that  the  value  between  both  groups  ranged  from  13.78  to  61%. The highest one was obtained by using the rigid sorting grid type with 2 and 1.2  cm  grid  intervals  while  the  lowest  values  were  observed  by  using  the  rigid  sorting  grid  with  3  cm  grid  interval,  the  rectangular  shaped  window  and  the  semi‐curved  window type with 1 cm grid interval (Figure 8). Based on this study, it can be con‐ cluded that the better performance on type and design of JTEDs was the rigid sorting  grid  with  2  and  1.2  cm.  grid  intervals.  However,  others  factors  and  conditions  also  have to be considered in recommending this type and designs of JTEDs to the fisher‐ men.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 219

Table1. Comparison of the escapement rate between juveniles and commercial target groups each  superscripted number on the first raw indicate type of device used as denoted below.  RS1 2

RS1.2 3

RS2 4

RS3 5

Rec1 6

Semi1 7

Escapement rate of juvenile (%) 

56.69 

71 

77 

74.31 

68.52 

61.09 

Escapement rate of commercial group (%) 

9.72 

11 

16 

50.33 

46.75 

47.31 

Different value of escapement rate between  juvenile and commercial target catch 

46.97 

60 

61 

23.98 

21.77 

13.78 

In percentage of different value of  escapement rate between juvenile and  commercial target catch 

20.64 

26.37 

26.80 

10.54 

9.57 

6.06 

  3 ) Selectivity by Rigid Sorting Grid JTEDs   Based on escapement rate of the juvenile and commercial/target catch groups includ‐ ing fish, shrimp and squids, the Rigid Sorting Grid with grid intervals of 2, 1.2 and 1  cm performs distinctively better than other types (Figure 8). The probability on size  of  the  catch  which  could  escape  at  each  grid  interval  is  compared  by  the  observed  and  estimated  selection  curves.  Due  to  Leiognathus  equarus  was  found  in  all  experi‐ ment  sets  the  fraction  retained  for  Leiognathus  equarus  is  plotted  against  the  total  length in the selection curve for the Rigid Sorting Grid with 1, 2 and 3 cm grid inter‐ vals. The results show that the L50% of those designs are 6.75 cm, 12.5 cm and 13.2  cm, the L75% are 7.79 cm, 15.01 cm and 16.40 cm respectively (Figures 9–11).   RS2

1

Fraction retained

Fraction retained

RS1

0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Observed selection

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1011 12 1314 15 1617 18 1920

10

Length (cm)

Length (cm)

Estimated selection

Observed selection

Estimated selection

   

Figure 9. Selection curve by Rigid Sorting8 

 

Figure 10. Selection curve by Rigid Sorting9 

                                                            2

Rigid Sorting Grid with 1 cm grid interval Rigid Sorting Grid with 1.2 cm grid interval 4 Rigid Sorting Grid with 2 cm grid interval 5 Rigid Sorting Grid with 3 cm grid interval 6 Rectangular shaped window with 1 cm grid interval 7 Semi-curved window with 1 cm grid interval 8 Sorting grid with 1cm 9 Sorting grid with 2cm 3

 

220 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Fraction retained

RS3 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

Length (cm) Observed selection

  

Estimated selection

  

Figure 11. Selection curve by Rigid Sorting. 

The mean value of the fish size able to escape from the Rigid Sorting Grid JTEDs with  1, 2 and 3 cm grid interval is 5.36, 7.9 and 14.73 cm respectively. The mean value of  total  fish  length  increases  with  increasing  size  of  grid  interval.  However,  as  this  re‐ gion is located in the tropical zone with high species diversity, (Sparre P. et al., 1989),  the  grid  interval  of  JTEDs  should  be  well  designed  suitable  for  the  average  size  of  target fish in each country.  Conclusions and recommendations Based on the results of this experiment, Rigid Sorting Grid JTEDs with 1.2 and 2 cm  grid interval has better performance in maximizing the escapement rate of the juve‐ nile while minimizing the escapement rate of the commercial or target catch. The size  of  fish  which  escaped  from  the  devices  depends  on  the  size  of  the  grid  interval.  In  this tropical region with high species diversity the fishermen are used to fish multi‐ target  species  with  varying  commercial  size.  Considering  those  factors  it’s  compli‐ cated in selecting the best size of the grid interval.   The experiment was carried out in many countries to demonstrate and introduce this  device  in  the  region.  Although  suitable  design  and  size  of  the  grid  interval  are  re‐ commenced  to  continuing  modification  should  be  considered  with  relevance  up  to  date  fishery  information  in  each  country.  More  importantly,  fishers  should  be  in‐ formed  and  make  to  understand  the  experimental  results,  and  encourage  them  to  change their attitude for improved fishing operation. With achieved level of selectiv‐ ity the fishers can benefit from the sustainable marine resources.  References Chokesanguan,  B.,  Ananpongsuk,  S.,  Siriraksophon,  S.,  and  Podapol,  L.  2004.  Study  on  Juve‐ nile and Trash Excluder Devices in Thailand, SEAFDEC/Training Department, pp. 1–18.  Chokesanguan,  B.,  Ananpongsuk,  S.,  Siriraksophon,  S.,  and  Abdul  I.  Hamid,  2004.  Study  on  Juvenile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  in  Brunei  Darussalum,  SEAFDEC/Training  Depart‐ ment, pp. 1–15.  Chokesanguan,  B.,  Ananpongsuk,  S.,  Siriraksophon,  S.  Wanchana,  W.,  and  Long,  N.  2004.  Study  on  Juvenile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  in  Vietnam.  SEAFDEC/Training  Depart‐ ment, pp. 1–20.  Chokesanguan, B., Ananpongsuk, S., Siriraksophon, S., and Rosidi, R. 2004. Study on Juvenile  and Trash Excluder Devices in Malaysia, SEAFDEC/Training Department, pp. 1–31.  Chokesanguan, B., Ananpongsuk, S., Chanrachakij, I., Manajit, N., and Tumpubolon, G. 2004.  Study  on  Juvenile  and  Trash  Excluder  Devices  in  Indonesia.  SEAFDEC/Training  Depart‐ ment, pp. 1–18.  Chokesanguan, B., Ananpongsuk, S., Siriraksophon, S., and Dickson, J. 2004. Study on Juvenile  and Trash Excluder Devices in the Philippines. SEAFDEC/Training Department, pp. 1–12. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 221

Jones, R. 1976. Mesh regulation in the demersal fisheries of the South China Sea areas, Manila,  South China Sea Fisheries Development and Coordinating Program. SCS/76/WP/34:75 p.  Kimura,  D.K.  1977.  Logistic  model  for  estimating  selection  ogives  from  catches  of  cod‐end  whose ogives overlap, J. Cons. CIEM, 38(1):116–9.  Pope, J.A., et al. 1975. Manual of methods for fish stock assessment. Pt3. Selectivity of fishing  gear, FAO Fish. Tech. Pap., (41) Rev.1:65 p.  Mastawee,  P.,  and  Theparoonrat,  Y.  2002.  Trawl  Net  Mesh  Selectivity  for  Lizardfish  (Saurida  elongate)  and  Blackspotted  Trevelly  (Caranx  leptolepis)  Using  Square  and  Diamond  Mesh  Cod‐end, Thai Fisheries Gazette, Vol.55.P.457–465.  Sparre, P., Ursin, E., and Venema, S.C. 1989. Introduction to tropical fish stock assessment, Part  1‐Manual, FAO Fish. Tech., 306:1, 337p.  Tokai T, Omoto S., Satou, R., and Matuda, K. 1996. A method of determining selectivity curve  of separation grid. Fish. Res., 27:51–60.   

I n d o n es i a Prof. Dr. Ir Ari Pubayanto, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Bogor Ag‐ ricultural University, Bogor  Brief background of the national (shrimp) trawl fisheries 1 ) Shrimp  trawl  fisheries  were  firstly  introduced  in  Indonesia  in  1970’s  by  foreign investment industry (PMA) and had improved increasingly.  2 ) By the year of 1980, the government banned the use of trawl through resi‐ dential Decree No. 39/1980.  3 ) Through  Presidential  Decree  No.  85/1982  concerning  with  operational  of  shrimp  trawler,  the  government  of  Indonesia  has  permitted  the  use  of  shrimp trawl to operate in certain area, limit in amount of fleets and obli‐ gated to install a TED on the net.  Fleet number and distribution 1 ) The shrimp trawl is licensed to operate in 1300 East to eastern around the  adjacent waters of Kei, Tanimbar and Aru Island.  2 ) Some  kinds of  fishing  gears (trawl  like,  but  not  trawls) are  licensed  to  be  operated by the small scale fishermen in all over Indonesia waters.  3 ) Fleet  number  of  shrimp  trawlers  (large  scale)  that  have  been  licensed  ap‐ proximately 200 units.  4 ) The small scale shrimp trawlers that have been licensed (by local govern‐ ment) are approximately 50,980 units. Commonly, they are named locally  by fishermen themselves as shown in the Table 1. 

 

222 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Table 1 Types of trawl that are existing in Indonesia.  Name

No

Name

No



Pukek Osoh (Padang) 

12 

Krakat (Java Sea) 



Pukat Ular (Sibolga) 

13 

Mini Beam Trawl (Java Sea) 



Pukat Apolo (Mallacca strait) 

14 

Arad (Java Sea) 



Pukat laying (Mallacca strait) 

15 

Arad berpalang/ berpapan (Java Sea) 



Dogol (Mallacca strait) 

16 

Mini Trawl (Maccassar Strait) 



Dogol berpalang/berpapan (Java Sea) 

17 

Andu (Java Sea/ DKI) 



Cantrang berpalang/  berpapan 

18 

Lampara (Seram, Tomini, Sulawesi) 



Lampara dasar berpapan/ berpalang (Java  Sea) 

19 

Lampara dasar (Sibolga, Belawan,  Makassar) 



Cotok (Java Sea) 

20 

Jaring WCW (Java Sea) 

10 

Garuk kerang (Java Sea) 

21 

Katrol/ Rengreng (Makassar Strait) 

11 

Payang Alit (Java Sea/ East Java) 

22 

Paddenreng (Makassar Strait) 

Goals/objectives of project implementation in Indonesia 1 ) Referring to nowadays fishermen’s are willing to review the possibility of  re‐operating trawl in Indonesia waters;  2 ) It  is  necessary  to  assess  the  socio‐economic  and  environmental  impact  of  the fisheries to the fishermen;  3 ) Through the FAO‐GEF Project, the government of Indonesia expect to get  some goals/objectives such as:  a ) To assess the existing condition of fish resources and their habitat  b ) To  assess  the  existing  types  of  fishing  gears  used  for  catching  the  demersal fisheries/shrimp  c ) Redesign the existing BRDs to make it appropriate with the Indonesian  waters and type of fishing gears (trawls)   d ) To review the existing legislation for regulating the shrimp trawl man‐ agement in Indonesia  Strategies and activities undertaken since the start of implementation 1 ) Conducting regular meetings with the stakeholders (industries sector, sci‐ entists, NGO/ fishermen) to formulate the grand strategies for solving the  shrimp trawl problem in Indonesia waters  2 ) Defining  the  national  steering  committee  of  the  project  to  work  more  closely, hand in hand each other  3 ) Involving  the  regional/  international  issues  concerning  the  shrimp  trawl  matters  4 ) Preparing the national work plans for the shrimp trawl issues, that consist  of:  a ) Problem identification concerning bycatch  b ) Stakeholder meetings  c ) Field surveys   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 223

d ) Base line study of BRD  e ) Development  /  adaptation  of  BRD  technologies  (optimisation  and  ex‐ perimental trial)  f ) Meeting, workshop   g ) Field demonstration of new technologies   h ) Research and engineering the Appropriate BRDs  i ) Reviewing  and  enhancing  Bycatch  Reduction  and  Change  Manage‐ ment of Trawl Fisheries through Comprehensive Regulations  j ) Introduction of appropriate BRDs technology to shrimp fishing fleets   k ) Dissemination of result   l ) Legalizing for BRD standardization   m ) Project evaluation  Members of the National Steering Committee HPPI: Shrimp Fishing Industry Association  ASPINTU: Non‐Tuna Industry Association  BRPL: Marine Fisheries Research Body  BBPPI: Fishing Technology Development Center  IPB: Bogor Agriculture Institute  STP: Jakarta Fisheries Institute  Table 2. Result and major technical achievements.  No

Activity/ Types of BRDs tested

Time

Devices tested



Introduction (demonstration and training on  TED/JTED) in Sorong, Papua Province 

26 August, – 6  September  2002 

1. TED: super shooter and  bent pipe  2. JTED: semi‐curve  window, rigid sorting grid  and rectangular windows  



Introduction (demonstration and training on  TED/JTED) in Ambon, Maluku Province 

20–25 October,  2003 

1. TED: super shooter,  Bent Pipe,   2. JTED: Semi Curve  Window, Rectangular  Shape window and Rigid  Sorting Grid 



Introduction (demonstration and training on  TED/JTED) in Sibolga, North Sumatra  Province 

4–9 October,  2004 

 JTEDs:  Rectangular shape,  Circular shape,  Rigid sorting grid and  Semi – curve Rigid sorting  grid   (1 cm, 2.5 cm, 4 cm)  

 

224 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

No

Activity/ Types of BRDs tested

Time

Devices tested



Introduction (demonstration and training on  TED/JTED) in Tual, Souteast Maluku Province 

13–21 June,  2004 

1. TEDs:  Super Shooter, Bent Pipe  and  TTFD (Thai Turtle Free  Device)  2. JTEDs:  Rigid Sorting Grid,  Rectangular Shape  Window and  Semi Curve Window 



Symposium On Present Status of Trawl In  Indonesian Waters in Jakarta 

25–27 April,  2005 

Base line study of BRD 



Introduction (demonstration and training on  TED/JTED) in Merauke, Papua Province 

28 November,  4 December,  2005 

1. TED: Bent pipe  2. JTED: Semi‐curve rigid  sorting grid (1 cm; 1,5 cm,  2 cm and 3 cm) 



Dissemination of Turtle Excluder Devices  (TEDs) Installation on Shrimp Trawl Net in  Indonesia “Promoting The Awareness of  Commercial Shrimp Trawl Fisheries towards  The Sustainability Fisheries” 

1 March, 2006 

Dissemination 



Introduction of Turtle Excluder Devices/Ted  (Super Shooter) on Small Scale Eco‐friendly  Trawl Net in Makassar Strait Areas  

12–16  November  2006 

TED Super Shooter Flat  Bottom type (MV. Madina,  30 GT).   TED Super Shooter Round  Bottom type (MV. Karya  Nelayan 2).  



Preliminary Review of Legislative and  Regulatory Frame Work in Relation to  Bycatch Reduction in The Shrimp Trawl  Fisheries in Indonesia 

Desember  2006 

Badia Sibuea  Melda Kamil Ariadno 

Table 3. Result and major technical achievements. 

 



Translating Book Of “A Guide To Bycatch  Reduction In Tropical Shrimp Trawl Fisheries”  By Mr. Steve Eayrs  

April – June,  2007 

Eni Sutopo 



Reviewing And Enhancing Bycatch Reduction  And Change Management Of Trawl Fisheries  In Indonesia Through Comprehensive  Regulations  

2007 

FPIK IPB  FH Univ. Indonesia  (Prof. Daniel Monintja,  team leader) 



Research and Engineering the Appropriate  BRD for Eco‐riendly Trawl in Indonesia 

2007 

BBPPI Semarang  FPIK IPB  (Prof. Ari Purbayanto,  team leader) 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Overall Expose “What and What Next”:  Dissemination of Bycatch Reduction Devices  (BRDs) and Change of Management for Trawl  Fisheries in Indonesia 

| 225

Jakarta, 18–19  March, 2008 

  

CURRENT STATUS OF SHRIMP TRAWL FISHERIES IN INDONESIA 1 ) The  increased  of  fuel  price  worldwide  (also  in  Indonesia),  has  become  a  great challenges to survive for the industry;  2 ) Some measures are taken by the industry, i.e.:   a ) increase  the  effectiveness  of  technical  trawl  performance  during  the  operation (use the smaller twine/ rope of net, enlarge the mesh size, etc  to reduce the net resistance);  b ) increase the effectiveness of financial performance (maintain the valu‐ able bycatch/ not discard them anymore, etc);  3 ) In  the  other  side,  the  above‐mentioned  situation,  positively  bring  a  good  atmosphere to have a closer dialogue between Industry and Government;  4 ) Therefore, the idea of comprehensively change management for trawl fish‐ eries (as will be regulated through The Presidential or Ministerial Decree?;  open/  close  season,  open/  close  area,  the  use  of  TED/  BRDs,  etc)  are  wel‐ comed by the industry;  5 ) The  idea  to  open  the  trawl  license  in  right  manner/  management  (which  was  banned,  especially  for  small  scale  fisheries,  but  in  fact  it  was  widely  operated by fishermen) are welcomed;  6 ) The draft of new regulation introducing change manner/ management for  trawl fisheries in Indonesia (comprehensively Presidential Decree on trawl  management  in  Indonesian  waters;  open/  close  season,  open/  close  area,  the use of TED/ BRDs, etc) had been finished by the completion of Review‐ ing & Enhancing Project on 14 October 2007 to use the tested TEDs/ BRDs;  7 ) Further  action  are  needed  to  finalize  the  implementation  of  the  compre‐ hensively change management for trawl regulation in Indonesia; socializa‐ tion/ public hearing, implement the idea in a pilot project area, etc.  CONCLUSIONS Mostly, goals of the project (as indicated in the achievable indicators) will be able to  be  achieved  by  the  completion  of  the  on‐going  project  BRDs  Research  &  Engineer‐ ing), are:  1 ) By June 2008, a draft of new regulation to use the tested TEDs/ BRDs and  change of management had been finished   2 ) (The draft of The Presidential Decree has been finished, 14 October, 2007)   3 ) Trial level, at least 20% reduction in discard in trials while maintaining the  level of shrimp catch in 12 participating countries   4 ) (13.36%,  during  the  fishing  trial  for  BRDs  Research  and  Engineering  Pro‐ ject)  5 ) Socio‐economic level, maintained level of net income of fishermen and in‐ dustry after introducing the selected BRDs as impact of the socio‐economic   6 ) (No progress yet: Pilot project for eco‐friendly trawl management in Indo‐ nesia was pending)   

226 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

7 ) On the‐ground impact level, 50% of the vessels of industrial trawl shrimp  fishery  will  introduce  tested  BRDs  by  June  2008  in  Indonesia  (on‐process  strategy: Renew the existing DG of Fisheries Decree on BRDs Construction  as resulted by the Research & Engineering The Appropriate BRDs project)  8 ) At least 15% of the vessels of artisanal trawl fishery will introduce tested  BRDs  by  June  2008  (No  progress  yet:  Pilot  Project  for  eco‐friendly  trawl  management in Indonesia‐pending)  9 ) Research and Engineering the Appropriate BRDs in the Indonesian Waters  will be organized   10 ) (Has been conducted: fishing trial 29 November – 9 December, 2007)   11 ) Indonesia will have adopted the techniques developed and transferred by  other  countries  at  beginning  of  2007  (comparative  study  to  Australia‐ pending)   The  consciousness  on  having  a  responsible  trawl  management  in  Indonesia  waters  has  increased,  as  indicated  during  the  latest  workshop  on  trawl  fisheries  in  Jakarta  (Overall expose “what and what next”:…, i.e.:  1 ) The draft of Presidential Decree on Trawl Management in Indonesia (pre‐ sented  by  the  Reviewing  and  Enhancing…  Consultant)  was  agreed  with  minor suggestion to be taken for further action (legalizing);  2 ) The  participants  agreed  with  all  management  measures  as  drafted  in  the  new regulatory for managing trawl fisheries in Indonesia;  3 ) The  participants  agreed  to  enlarge  mesh  size  of  cod‐end  become  >  50mm  (for shrimp) and > 120mm (for fish).  4 ) The  participants  agreed  to  obligate  to  install  BRDs  either  for  shrimp  (TEDs) or fish (square mesh?).  RecommendationS (for REBYC Phase II) 1 ) A  mechanism  of  information  sharing  between  participating  countries  should have been prepared before end of project, either the project will be  continued by the 2nd phase or not;  2 ) Before end of the project (June 2008), a new FAO‐GEF Project commitment  to follow up the project should be arranged. Since, each country seems to  be not able to get 100% (in average less than 50%?) of achievable target as  discussed at our last meeting in Philippine;  3 ) The new project should involve wider participating countries among each  region (Asian, Western Africa, Gulf Region, Latin America and Caribbean).  For instance: Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, and other coun‐ tries in Southeast Asia region. Since, fisheries resources are sometimes also  utilized  by  some  other  countries  (particularly  in  EEZ  of  each  country,  on  which  haven’t  been  fully  utilized  by  the  shore  country)  also  because  of  fishes are migratory species;  4 ) A wider stake holder (private sectors, researchers/ academicians, etc) also  should be involved in the new project;  5 ) The  new  project  should  cover  issues  on  the  improvement  of  fishers’  con‐ sciousness on fisheries resources, not only turtle conservation. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 227

Iran A. Mojahedi, Iranian Fisheries Organisation, Deputy for Fishing and Fishing  Harbours, Tehran, Iran.  Abstract National  Research  activities  on  Bycatch  reduction  started  in  1992  at  Persian  Gulf  Fisheries Research Center (Boushehr) and First BRD fabricated in the same year. Af‐ ter  these  initial  measures,  square  mesh  efficiency  in  Shrimp  trawl  net  was  investi‐ gated  and  100  mm  Square  mesh  window,  showed  improved  results  in  excluding  small fishes. Two years after obligatory use of SMW in shrimp trawl nets and achiev‐ ing not ideal results, Iran Fisheries Organization in cooperation with FAO, launched  new round of experiments in 1997. Different types of BRDʹs have been experimented  during  these  trials,  such  as:  RES,  NAFTED,  Fish  eye  and  cone.  Initial  outcomes  showed  that  NAFTED  is  efficient  for  excluding  large  aquatics.  Broad  range  studies  performed  during  years  2000–2001,  on  bar  devices  (NAFTED  &  Grid)  and  SMW  comparison  and  results  pointed  out  that  Grid  Type  (NORDMOR  Grid)  is  the  most  efficient one comparing with other devices. Regarding achieving results, during 2006,  100 Grid 8mm devices, have been fabricated and applied for Industrial trawlers.  Regarding  this  fact  that,  more  than  90%  of  shrimp  capture,  harvested  by  artisanal  fishing  vessels  fleet  and  graduation  adjustment  plan  for  Industrial  trawlers  which  practically will reduce Industrial shrimp trawler numbers, therefore it is necessary to  experiment and promote BRDʹs on artisanal vessels. Then the aim of the project based  on excluding juvenile and small fish. All measures in project framework planned to  achieve this goal. Net modification is the first option for excluding juvenile and small  fishes,  and  further  options  could  be  most  effective  device  which  will  be  selected  through experiments and advices we receive from international consultants.  Grid 80 Installation on Industrial Trawlers  Sessions and Decisions: In total, 6 sessions have been held during this stage of project progress and different  decisions have been taken.  •



Projectʹs secretary session held on Saturday, April14, 2007 to make decision  for  assembling  steering  committee  and  determine  operational  measures.  Mr. Ali Mojahedi, Mr. Hussein Ostadmohammadi and Mr. Shahram Safi‐ yary, attended this session and following decisions resulted:  i )

Steering  committee  members  determined  and  it  is  decided  those  com‐ mittee sessions to be formed along with project progress. 

ii )

Technical committee members determined to hold a session and decide  on project performance aspects and report outcomes to steering commit‐ tee for approval 

iii )

Preparing  a  brief  report  on  Project  Background  and  achievements  in  pervious stages to Steering committee members 

iv )

Setting up Time and Cost tables 

Two Technical Committee sessions (comprises experts from IFO and Local fisher‐ ies offices namely Boushehr, Hormozgan) held on April 23 and May 27, 2007 to  make decision on Operation.   

228 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Technical aspects with following outcomes:  •

Performing trials by artisanal shrimp trawling vessels in Hormozgan and  Boushehr provinces 



Grid  80  Installation  training  in  active  shrimp  trawlers  and  surveillance  during shrimp harvest season 



Following devices and modifications recommended to steering committee  for trial completion: 

Trawl net construction modification  •

JTED 



Applying proper Grid according to artisanal vessels  



Trawl nets 



Net modification through bottom chain 



Applying Fish eye 

Regarding  this  fact  that  net  construction  diversity  is  too  much  in  two  mentioned  provinces  artisanal  vessels,  most  common  net  and  Dhows,  decided  to  report  to  the  steering committee for further decisions.  •

Artisanal  vessels  with  engine  power  between  200–300  horse  powers  se‐ lected as most suitable group for trial performance. 



3 amended nets, to be fabricated, based on technical committee proposed  plan 



5 JTEDʹs to be fabricated, for each province Juvenile and small fish deter‐ mined as main excluding target group. 



Three steering committee sessions, as the highest assembly for projectʹs pro‐ gress decision making, have been held on 25 June. 



2007,  16  October,  2007  and  30  January,  2008  in  Tehran,  Bandarabbas  and  Qeshm Island respectively. following decisions have been finalized during  these sessions and communicated for implementation:  i )

Final selection of two Dhows which introduced by technical committee 

ii )

Final  selection  of  the  province  which  trials  should  be  performed  in  its  water 

iii )

Review  the  results  of  Shrimp  trial  trawl  accomplished  by  Ho  mozgan  province Dhows (results review, outcomes analyzing and discussing on  Constraints and problems) 

iv )

Regarding high discard level by fishing trawlers , it is decided that some  projectʹs capacities exploit for this issue , based on agreement with FAO 

v )

Deciding  on  workshop  holding  time,  International  consultant  capabili‐ ties and selection, after workshop trials 

3 rd Steering Committee session Performed Measures

During 6 months from July to December 2007, different measures have been taken in  different fields, but the main task was BRD trial by artisanal shrimp trawlers in Hor‐ mozgan waters. Below all measures are listed: 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Holding three training sessions for fishermen in Hormozgan and Boushehr  provinces. 



Producing Extensional program to broadcast from local media. 



Distribution and Installation of Grid 80 device on 11 Industrial trawl ves‐ sels.  These  devices  fabricated  in  2006  and  distributed  for  shrimp  harvest  season in Hormozgan and Boushehr. A team consists of 6 experts during  shrimp harvest season were onboard for Installation, Training and super‐ vision purposes. 



BRD fabrication and Net making – 6 trawl nets (3 for Boushehr vessels and  3  for  Hormozgan  vessels)  and  10  JTEDʹs  (5  for  Hormozgan  vessels  and  5  for Boushehr vessels). It is notable that all primary works had been done to  perform  experiments  in  Boushehr,  but  due  to  delay  in  fund  release  ap‐ proval for vessels contract, the trials program shifted to Hormozgan prov‐ ince vessels. Fabricated devices could be utilized for shrimp harvest season  2008. 



Purchasing essential needs for project progress such as: Laptop computers,  Scales, Biometry devices, personal needs for onboard personnel.  



Producing a documentary movie from all trials step in English. 



Producing an Extensional movie to introduce BRDʹs and to increase rate of  acceptance in Farsi language. 



Printing Promotional items specifically: Posters, Banners, and Stands. 



for BRD promotion in fishing harbours and fishing vessels. 



Forming teams consist of experienced experts to execute trials properly. 



Holding  frequent  sessions  for  experts  for  experiments  superior  perform‐ ance.  Most of mentioned steps have been done for trial execution by artisanal shrimp trawlers. 

| 229

Experiment  implementation  on  Artisanal  shrimp  trawlers  in  Hormozgan  province  waters in a 29 days period. Regarding importance of this project step, it is described  separately. This experiment, has been performed for the purpose of different Bycatch  Reduction  Devices  comparison,  in  Artisanal  trawlers,  within  Hormozgan  province  fishing  grounds  (contains:  Sirak,  Kuhestak,  Dar  Sorkh,  Aab  Shirin  Kon,  Keshti‐e‐  Sukhte, Tula) during 29 days shrimp harvest season (from 8 October, till 13 Novem‐ ber, 2007) by two trial and blank vessels which harvested simultaneously.  Two different types of devices namely; JTED (for juvenile fish reduction) and Modi‐ fied ground gear (from horizontal to parallel for seabed destruction reduction) exam‐ ined based on a pre determined schedule. Data related to each harvest operation, has  been  recorded  separately  in  specific  forms  contain  some  information  e.g.  vessel  speed, harvesting time, longitude and latitude, fishing ground information, Sea con‐ ditions,  discard  level,  juvenile  fish  level  lower  than  LM50(Length  at  which  50  per‐ cents  of  the  individuals  fish,  matured),  large  fish  harvest  amount,  shrimp  harvest  rate, etc. Results obtained from 91 times fishing, showed that by applying JTED in 44  times fishing turns, small shrimp weight and large shrimp weight have been reduced  16.5% and 43%, respectively. However commercial fish species have been increased  by 0.5% and discard reduced by 38.6%.   Applying  JTED  equipped  with  guiding  panel  28  times  fishing  turns,  small  size  shrimp  and  large  size  shrimp  reduced  by  31%  and  18.5%  respectively.  However  commercial fish species increased by 6.7% and discard rate reduced by 45%. 

 

230 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Applying parallel chain ground gear in 15 fishing turns, demonstrated; small size and  large  size  shrimp  reduction,  38.9  and  20.7%,  respectively.  Commercial  fish  species  and discard amount also decreased by 26% and 3.3%, respectively.  Consequently, shrimp reduction in both JTED with guiding panel and without guid‐ ing panel, observed. But the shrimp reduction amount in JTED with guiding panel is  lower; In the meantime Bycatch reduction percentage in this device is higher. There‐ fore JTED with guiding panel is more efficient.  As  we  observe  in  parallel  chain  ground  gear  results;  shrimp  reduction  amount  is  similar  to  other  experimented  devices  and  Bycatch  reduction  rate  is  extremely  low  (3.3%) and could be considered sufficient only for commercial fish species.  Ultimately it is concluded that; comparing these 3 devices shows that; according pro‐ ject objectives, JTED with guiding panel is more sufficient in comparison with 2 other  devices.  Vessels Technical specification:

Two dhows (Artisanal vessel) used in trials with below specification:  Rostami (3/9749) – Fiberglass Length: 21 Meters  Width: 6 Meters  Engine Power : 300 Horsepower  Yaar(3/7304) – Wooden Length: 19.2 Meters  Width : 6.8 Meters  Engine Power : 320 Horsepower  Navigation system for both vessels is GPS – Wireless set  Fishing Gear Technical specification :

Otter Board: wooden with metal frame Weight : 85 Kg, Dimensions: 180  * 90  Ground Gear : Chain No.8 , Weight : 75 Kg , Length : 53 Meters  Float : EVA , No.10 , Quantity : 21  Net:  Mesh size in main body : 45→ 210D/24Ply/45mm STR/100MD/200y  Mesh size in Cod end : 20 → 210D/30Ply/20mm STR/100MD/100y  Net material : Poly amide  Treatments

After  Technical  committee  assembly  and  holding  expert  sessions  in  Hormozgan  province, it was decided; following treatments to be done: JTED;(aiming juvenile fish  reduction) 2 situation ; with and without Guiding panel  Ground Gear Modification from horizontal to parallel position (aiming avoiding sea‐ bed destruction and stingray catch reduction)  JTED Device specification

Material: Metal frame and rope net  Weight: 13.5 Kg  4 Buoys, No.10 EVA  Dimension: 3 sections each : 40*50 cm  Grid bar spacing : 4 cm   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 231

Grid angle : 45º  Grid bindings : 40 cm  Angle fitting by chain  Modified Chain specification

Weight: 75 Kg  Quantity: 131  Chain height: 40 cm  Chain spacing: 28 cm  Links number for each chain: 16 & 17 links  Trial fishing Implementation

BRD test project for shrimp Artisanal trawlers in Hormozgan province started Octo‐ ber 8, 2007 and completed; November 13, 2007.(totally 29 working days onboard) 91  harvests,  each  one  took  long  2  hours,  by  2  vessels  simultaneously,  being  parallel,  have  been  completed.  One  vessel  as  blank  (ordinary  net),  another  one  as  trial  equipped with BRD harvested, at the same time. Catch statistics, recorded precisely  in particular forms. Three treatments were done, in this trial fishing period which in  treatment 1 to 3; with 44, 28 and 15 times harvesting, respectively.   Table 1. Treatment 1 (Traditional Net + JTED). Number of Tows= 44.  Large Shrimp kg

Control 

Trial 

1159 

657 

43% reduction 

Small Shrimp kg

Control  322 

Trial  268 

16.5% reduction 

Commercial Fish kg

Control 

Trial 

353 

Discards kg

Control  

354 

Trial 

8564 

0.5% increase 

5240 

38.6% redcution 

Table 2. Treatment 2 (Traditional net +JTED with cover). Number of Tows = 28.  Large Shrimp kg

Control  156.6 

Trial  127.6 

18.5% reduction 

Small Shrimp kg

Control  124.2 

Trial  85.4 

31% reduction 

Commercial Fish kg

Control 

Trial 

132.5 

141.5 

6.7% increase 

Discards kg

Control   2218.5 

Trial  1217.6 

45% reduction 

Table 3. Treatment 3 (Traditional net +parallel chain). Number of Tows = 15.  Large Shrimp kg

Control 

Trial 

939 

744 

20.7% reduction 

Small Shrimp kg

Control  208.5 

Trial  127 

38.9% reduction 

Commercial Fish kg

Control 

Trial 

77.5  26% reduction 

57.2 

Discards kg

Control   2218.5 

Trial  1217.6 

3.3% reduction 

Funds and Costs

The total fund for project is 375000 USD, which, roughly 84423.86 USD of this amount  was  spent  till  end  of  2007.  Due  to  some  problems  have  occurred,  some  costs  have  been  cancelled  and  replaced  with  other  items.  Namely  Purchasing  Vehicles  men‐ tioned  in  (40000USD)  and  Dhow  leasing,  both  funds  will  be  used  in  Fish  trawling  Workshop  regarding  a  mutual  agreement  between  National  coordinator  and  Mr.  Fogelgren. According to our commitments for performing rest of project phases, fol‐ lowing task has been remained: Almost 12000 USD for Documentary Movie   

232 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Almost  6000USD  for  Statistics  program  (Regarding  completed  Bid‐Offer)  Almost  10000USD for Farsi version of Bycatch reduction manual (translation and print) – Bid  process  is  underway.  Almost  6500USD  for  Kids  Drawing  book  –  Bid  process  is  un‐ derway for Costs of Trawl Management Regional Workshop, Trials and International  consultants are roughly 70000USD as mentioned in TOR.  Results and Outcomes Results  obtained  from  91  times  fishing,  showed  that  by  applying  JTED  in  44  times  fishing turns, small shrimp weight and large shrimp weight have been reduced 16.5%  and 43%, respectively. However commercial fish species have been increased by 0.5%  and discard reduced by 38.6%. Applying JTED equipped with guiding panel 28 times  fishing turns, small size shrimp and large size shrimp reduced by 31% and 18.5% re‐ spectively.  However  commercial  fish species increased  by 6.7% and  discard  rate  re‐ duced  by  45%.  Applying  parallel  chain  groundgears  in  15  fishing  turns,  demonstrated;  small  size  and  large  size  shrimp  reduction,  38.9  and  20.7%,  respec‐ tively. Commercial fish species and discard amount also decreased by 26% and 3.3%,  respectively. Shrimp reduction in both JTED with guiding panel and without guiding  panel,  observed.  But  the  shrimp  reduction  amount  in  JTED  with  guiding  panel  is  lower; In the meantime Bycatch reduction percentage in this device is higher. There‐ fore  JTED  with  guiding  panel  is  more  efficient.  As  we  observe  in  parallel  chain  ground  gear  results;  shrimp  reduction  amount  is  similar  to  other  experimented  de‐ vices  and  Bycatch  reduction  rate  is  extremely  low  (3.3%)  and  could  be  considered  sufficient only for commercial fish species. Ultimately it is concluded that; comparing  these 3 devices shows that; according project objectives, JTED with guiding panel is  more sufficient in comparison with 2 other devices. 

Cuba Luis Font Chávez, Fishery Ministry, Havana, Cuba, [email protected]  Abstract Constructive characteristics of trawl nets used in tropical shrimp fisheries, present a  marked  negative  effect  on  benthic  populations  and  bottom  species,  constituting  a  threat for conservation of biological diversity and marine environment. Nevertheless  and  taking  into  account  that  the  catch  of  this  resource  represents  an  important  eco‐ nomic  and  social  source,  it  is  necessary  to  promote  the  use  of  lower  impact  catch  technologies and that their introduction in the fishery be technical and economically  feasible. Results reached up to present in the project have been aimed to the design,  construction  and  test  at  experimental  and  commercial  level,  in  Santa  Cruz  del  Sur  Fishing  Enterprise,  of  a  less  harmful fishing  technology  to  environment,  being  veri‐ fied important advantages as: to allow an escape of near 25% of bycatch, thus reduc‐ ing  the  negative  effect  on  fish  populations  and  specially  juvenile  stages  of  Lane  snapper (Lutjanus synagris) and also increasing the fishing gear selectivity to the catch  of  Pink  shrimp  (Farfantepenaeus  notialis),  with  no  detriment  of  the  present  observed  levels and consequently an increase in the catch exportable value. At the same time,  regulatory measures on the fishery have been dictated which substantially contribute  to the protection of shrimp populations and species composing bycatch. Other fore‐ seen results are related to the reduction of net constructive costs and fuel consump‐ tion. Project execution has been characterized by the active participation of managers,  technical  personnel  of  the  Enterprise,  as  well  as  captains  and  fishermen  of  shrimp  vessels,  who  have  contributed  with  valuable  experiences  and  practical  execution  in   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 233

the project development by participating in cruises, conferences, workshops, and ad‐ vanced qualifying  courses for  the  personnel  dedicated  to  net  construction.  The  new  fishing system will be introduced in Santa Cruz del Sur Fishing Enterprise at the end  of ban in the 2008–2009 seasons.   RESULTS WORK AREA

Investigation was conducted in Santa Cruz del Sur Industrial Fishing Enterprise op‐ eration area, Province of Camagüey, located in Cuba’s southeastern zone.   Design, construction and test of net prototypes

The new design of shrimp twin net used is the denominated Prototype E3 (10.4/10.0  m), with a fish escape device ʺfish eyeʺ‐ type. Design of net Prototype E3 is the result  of previous development of 6 experimental cruises with 154 hauls, which allowed to  improve  both  prototypes  (E1  and  E2)  initially  used.  Traditional  net  is  the  denomi‐ nated shrimp net 9.0/9.8 m, currently employed in vessels operating in the Enterprise  fishing zone. In Table 1 the main characteristics and calculated technical parameters  are presented, that define the hydrodynamics quality of both fishing gears.   Table 1. Characteristics and technical parameters of the Traditional and E3 net.  Parameter

Traditional Net

E3 Net

9.0 

10.4 

155.0 

129.6 

Area of net mouth, m   

9.8 

10.0 

Horizontal opening, m  

6, 3 

7.3 

Vertical opening, m  

1,9 

1,6 

Net weight without codend, kg  

7,4 

5.9 

1609.4 

1415.3 

Upper rope length, m   2

Area of net mesh part, m  .   2 

Resistance to trawl, Newton  

  These  modifications  mainly  influence  in  the  increase  of  horizontal  opening  and  de‐ crease  of  vertical’s,  contributing  to  the  reduction  of  fish  catch  of  the  system,  taking  into account the distribution habits in the water column of the species that compose  bycatch. On the other hand, differences in mesh surface area, net weight and hydro‐ dynamics resistance, directly influence in a lower effort of main engine and a slight  reduction in materials and fuel consumption.   A fish escape device was added to the net, constructed of stainless steel bars of 8 mm  diameter and consists in an ellipse‐shaped ring with a larger diameter of 50 cm and a  smaller  one  of  25  cm,  with  a  50  cm  total  length,  which  is  fixed  to  a  piece  of  mesh  added between the net body and the codend and in the upper central line of the net   To verify the fishing and economic efficiency of the new fishing system under com‐ mercial  regime,  3  cruises  were  conducted,  with  a  total  of  99  hauls  with  an  average  duration of 2½ hours, on board Vessels FC‐24 and Plástico 1, of 21 meters of overall  length and constructed of ferrocement and fibreglass respectively and equipped with  traditional nets in a side and Prototype nets E3 with ʺ Fish‐eyeʺ‐ type escape device in  the other. Nets were alternated in their location, considering operational characteris‐ tics  of  trawls  in  the  fishing  zone,  which  generally  make  turns  that  increase  the   

234 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

trawled area by starboard side, which slightly influences in catch increase of nets lo‐ cated in this side of the vessel.   Effects of the new fishing system on shrimp catch Catch and size composition

In the three commercial cruises performed, with a total of 99 hauls, catches obtained  by both fishing gears were similar, with slight increases in net E3, although statisti‐ cally no significant differences were observed among them. Nevertheless, the reten‐ tion of greater sizes in net under study resulted evident. Processing of the observed  size composition from measurement obtained in the 3 commercial cruises, with a to‐ tal of 8 580 individuals in the case of the experimental net and 8 473 in the traditional  one, indicated that sizes lower than 8.2 cm are retained in a greater extent in the lat‐ est, while for sizes higher than 8.7 cm the result is inverse. Mean values for the tradi‐ tional and modified net were of 8.6 cm and 8.8 cm respectively.   Economic assessment determined by the gear effect on shrimp catch

The increase of gear selectivity favourably influences the escape of small individuals,  which are likely to be caught later at a greater size. Additionally, if taken into account  the volumes of shrimp catch in both fishing systems, the economic result of the fish‐ ing operation is higher for the same operation level.   Calculated value of the catch is presented in Table 2, observed by type of fishing gear  in the three commercial cruises, evaluating the levels of catch by exportable category  to the current prices of the international market, (Exporter CARIBEX February/2008)  and applied to the marine shrimp export categories, for 1 ton of catch. Results indi‐ cate an increase of USD 343.35 by ton, according to the size composition retained by  each net.   Table 2. Catch value by type of net.  Categories

Price/kg USD

Traditional Net

Income/ton USD 

E3 Net

Income/ton USD 

100/120 

4,65 

1081,60 

906,98 

80/100 

5,91 

549,65 

508,74 

58/80 

6,23 

883,00 

895,70 

43/52 

6,88 

1193,55 

1174,69 

34/43 

7,18 

611,90 

627,97 

28/34 

10,80 

1430,24 

1561,99 

22/28 

12,07 

996,41 

1218,00 

13/21 

15,80 

931,81 

1127,44 

Total 

 

7678.16 

8021.51 

Increase in catch value/ton 

343.55 

Incidence of the new fishing system on fish catches reduction

Bycatch of shrimp fishery in our country is constituted by a large amount of marine  organisms, in which fish predominate with values near to 75–80% of the total caught.  Levels of presence in catches depend on multiple factors, among which can be mainly  cited:  fishing  time,  trawl  depth,  season  of  the  year,  geographic  location,  as  well  as 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 235

those  caused  due  to  the  design  of  the  net  used,  deficiencies  in  calibration  of  trawl  doors, excess of weight in the footrope and trawl speed.   In Cuban fisheries, the bycatch/shrimp rate ranges between 3.2 and 6.3 values, being  likely to reach higher levels in hauls performed in areas where sponges, sea urchins  (Moyra sp) or jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) are abundant according to the life cycle of these  species.   Analysis  of  species  composition  by  commercial  and  sampling  cruises  over  the  last  five years, for Ana Maria and Guacanayabo Gulfs, showed that there are 11 fish spe‐ cies  representing  near  90%  of  the  catch  and  from  them:  Yellow  fin  mojarra  (Gerres  spp).  Lane  snapper  (Lutjanus  synagris),  Mojarra  (Diapterus  sp),  Atlantic  bumper  (Chlo‐ roscombrus  chrysurus)  and  Tomtate  grunt  (Haemulon  aerolineatum),  integrates  near  75%. The Ground croaker (Micropogonias sp), Searobin (Prionotus punctatus), Sand se‐ abass (Diplectrum formosum) and the Blackedge cusk‐eel (Lepophidium graëllsi), present  incidence levels in the order of 5 to 3%.   A noticeable variation in species compositions is observed from the beginning of the  90´s  of  last  century,  reported  by  several  national  authors.  Such  a  variation  is  due,  among other factors, to overexploitation of bycatch components, mainly fish, by the  null  selectivity  of  the  shrimp  fishing  gear.  This  has  determined  that  predominant  species at present catches, are of low commercial value and others like lane snapper,  sand  sea  bass  and  the  blackedge  cusk‐eel,  are  caught  in  juvenile  stages  and  show  a  considerable reduction in current catch volumes, regarding the above mentioned pe‐ riod.   Effect of the new system on fish catches

Results obtained in experimental cruises and corroborated in those conducted under  commercial fishing conditions, indicate a reduction near 25% of fish catches, includ‐ ing a 4.1% of lane snapper juveniles, thus decreasing the negative effect of the current  shrimp gear on the sustainability of fish resources in the fleet operation zone.   On  the  other  hand,  as  previously  indicated,  fish  escape  by  the  use  of  escape  device  contributes to the quality of shrimp caught, because the resource suffers a lower me‐ chanical damage taking into account that cleaner catches are obtained, being reduced,  additionally, time employed in catch processing on board the vessel.   Fishing management measures adopted:

Regulation measures, constitute a valuable tool for the protection of shrimp resources  and  bycatch  in  general,  especially  those  directed  to  the  application  of  total  closures  and  by  areas,  diminishing  of  fleet  capacity  and  the  increase  of  the  selectivity  of  the  fishing gear. In Cuba, in recent years the following resolutions have been established.   INCREASE OF TOTAL BAN PERIOD Resolution 180/2003 July 15‐ October 15 3 months   Resolution 158/2004 July 15‐ November 15 4 months   Resolution 112/2005 July 15‐ November 30 4 ½ months   Resolution 155/2006 July 15‐ November 30 4 ½ months   (Resolution 078/2007 April 1st/07‐ February 1st /2008 10 months)   OTHER PROVISIONS – Resolutions 158/2004 and 155/2006.  

 

236 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

PROTECTION OF NURSERY AREA



Shrimp trawl prohibition to less than one nautical mile from coast. 

LIMITATION OF FISHING EFFORT LEVEL



Limitation of number of vessels allowed operating in the fishing zone to 50  units.  

INCREASE IN NET SELECTIVITY



Increase in mesh size of shrimp nets.  



Prohibition the use of a second codend and establishment the covering the  bottom half of the codend with a protecting net sheet.  

RECRUITMENT PROTECTION



Suspension  of  fishing  in  zones  of  high  abundance  of  small  size  shrimps  and stages of molt (small and damaged shrimp) superior to 25%.  

Present status of investigation

As a  conclusion  of  the  experimental  phase  and  verification  of  results in  commercial  cruises, it was arranged with the direction of Santa Cruz del Sur Fishing Enterprise to  rig 3 vessels with the new system, which would begin to operate at the end of current  ban (February, 2008). At present time, 2 vessels are operating with this fishing gear,  with results that corroborate those obtained in the experimental phase. The third ves‐ sel  should  begin  to  work  next  month  of  March,  when  the  new  gears  are  available.  These activities are aimed to gradually introduce the system and to acquire the prac‐ tical experience by the captains and crew.   On  the  other  hand,  Santa  Cruz  del  Sur  Fishing  Enterprise  and  PESCACUBA  Enter‐ prise Group is providing knowledge and support for the execution and conclusion of  the project, due to their active participation in the development and exchange of ex‐ periences with vessel captains, being also pointed out in addition, that personnel for  construction of new nets is available, who was qualified through theoretical‐practical  courses.   Introduction of the Net E3 with escape device in Santa Cruz del Sur Fishing Enterprise

According to the planned chronogram, the new fishing system will be introduced in  shrimp  vessels  of  Santa  Cruz  del  Sur  Fishing  Enterprise,  at  the  2008–2009  seasons,  being dictated the legal provisions required for its fulfilment.   

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 237

Trinidad and Tobago Suzuette Soomai Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine  Resources, St. Clair Circle, St Clair, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Abstract Three periods of gear trials were conducted over 2006 and 2007 in the artisanal fleet  and one period in 2007 in the semi‐industrial and industrial fleets, overall covering an  estimated 25% of the national trawl fleet. Gear trials involved modifying the existing  trawl  net,  testing  of  two  bycatch  reduction  devices  (BRDs)  namely  the  fisheye  and  square mesh panel, and testing of a new monofilament trawl net received from Mex‐ ico  and  aimed  at  reducing  the  level  of  discards  of  bycatch  caught  in  the  artisanal  shrimp trawl fishery. Overall results are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of  each BRD in reducing discards. Modifications to the existing net and the new mono‐ filament  net  however  showed  favourable  results  with  regard  to  making  fishing  op‐ erations more efficient. Joint gear testing between the Fisheries Department and the  fishing  industry  has  been  beneficial  in  educating  fishers  and  promoting  co‐ management  of  the  trawl  fishery.  Technical  assistance  from  the  National  Fisheries  Institute  of  Mexico  and  from  the  FAO  was  instrumental  in  technology  transfer  and  enhancing  fisheries  research  in  Trinidad  and  Tobago.  Gear  testing  allowed  for  col‐ laboration  with  Venezuela  on  joint  research  in  the  Gulf  of  Paria  and  the  Columbus  Channel where the shrimp and groundfish resources are shared.   Introduction

The shrimp trawl fishery of Trinidad and Tobago targets five penaeid shrimp species  (Litopenaeus  schmitti,  Farfantepenaeus  subtilis,  F.  notialis,  F.  brasiliensis,  Xiphopenaeus  kroyeri).  Groundfish  bycatch  of  commercial  importance  is  the  sciaenids  (Cynoscion  spp,  Macrodon  ancylodon,  Micropogonias  furnieri),  gerreids  (Diapterus  spp.),  lutjanids  (Lutjanus  spp.,  Rhomboplites  aurorubens),  haemulids  (Haemulon  spp.,  Genyatremus  lu‐ teus,  Orthopristis  spp.)  and  ariids  (Bagre  spp,  Arius  spp)  (Kuruvilla  et  al.,  2001).  In  Trinidad,  the  resources  are  exploited  by  an  artisanal,  semi‐industrial  and  industrial  trawl fleet. The shrimp and groundfish resources in the main trawling grounds in the  Gulf of Paria and Columbus Channel are considered to be shared stocks exploited by  the fleets of both Trinidad and Tobago and Venezuela.   The high levels of bycatch and discards is of great concern since only a small portion  of the bycatch is retained and landed and most is discarded at sea. An estimated 90%  of the bycatch of artisanal vessels, and 71% of the bycatch of the semi‐industrial fleet,  is discarded and most are juvenile fish of other important coastal fisheries (Kuruvilla  et al., 2000). This is one of the main sources of conflict between the trawl fishery and  other fisheries such as the artisanal gillnets and lines. In a 1994 local knowledge sur‐ vey  fishers  noted  a  decline  in  catches  and  the  general  perception  was  that  trawling  was responsible for destruction of the seafloor and juvenile fish (Ramjohn, 1995).  The  high  level  of  bycatch  and  subsequent  discarding  is  due  to  two  main  factors.  Firstly, the shrimp trawl fishery is a tropical multi‐species coastal fishery targeted by  a gear that is relatively unselective. Secondly, the vessel used for trawling have a lim‐ ited hold capacity and to maintain net profits only the target shrimp species and by‐ catch for which there is commercial value is landed. 

 

238 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Methods Artisanal Fleet

The  artisanal  fleet  targets  mainly  Litopenaeus  schmitti  and  Xiphopenaeus  kroyerii.  The  net  currently  in  use  by  the  fleet  consists  of  a  flat  trawl  net  made  of  multifilament  twine with a head rope length of 34 feet and mesh size of 1 ¼ inches. In November  2006  a  double  foot  rope  was  introduced  into  the  design  of  the  traditional  net.  The  second foot rope was made of chain and was separated from the main foot rope by  nylon  twine  strings.  Steel  triangles  were  also  used  to  obtain  the  desired  separation  along the whole length of both foot ropes. Trawls were made at an average depth of  1.4 m and towing speed from 2.5 to 3.2 knots (Soomai and Seefoo, 2006).   In May 2007, a fisheye was installed in the artisanal trawl net between the last panel  of  the  trawl  body  and  the  codend.  Separate  experiments  were  conducted  using  a  square  mesh  panel  in  place  of  the  fisheye.  Paired  trawls  were  conducted  using  two  vessels  and  the  experimental  gear  from  above  (Net  1)  and  the  control  net  (Net  2)  where:  •

Net 1: Flat trawl net with head rope length ‐ 34 feet, mesh size ‐ 1 ½ inches;  



Net 2: Flat trawl net with head rope length ‐ 34 feet, mesh size ‐ 1 ¼ inches.  

Trawl doors were used in all of the trials. (Soomai, 2007).  In  October  ‐  November  2007,  gear  trials  commenced  on  a  new  prototype  monofila‐ ment  trawl  net  received from  the  INP, Mexico.  The new  net  was rigged,  tested  and  modified, to ensure that it was fishing well in local conditions (Soomai, 2008). Head  rope length was 46.5 feet with 3/8 inch diameter nylon rope and monofilament net of  8  ‐10  twine  gauge.  The  new  gear  was  tested  against  the  previously  modified  multi‐ filament net (control net) and with the fisheye and square mesh panel installed.  Semi-industrial fleet

The semi‐industrial trawl fleet targets Farfantepenaeus notialis and F. subtilis. The main  characteristics of the trawl system were:  Head rope length: 34 feet  Foot rope length: 38 feet   Tickle chain length: 35 feet  Mesh size: 1 ¾ inch  Otter boards: wood and steel, 6 feet long, 34 inches high, an angle of attack  of approximately 24°.  Bridles: 20 fathoms long made of 7/16 inch diameter steel wire.   To install the fisheye in the experimental net, a netting extension of 30 by 100 meshes  of  1  5/8  inches  was  prepared  and  inserted  between  the  last  panel  of  the  trawl  body  and the codend. A second foot rope made of chain was installed in this net and was  separated from the main foot rope by nylon twine strings 8 inches long. Paired trawls  were conducted at depths of 6 ‐ 9 fathoms in the Gulf of Paria and average trawling  time was 3 hours/haul at a towing speed of 3.0 knots (Soomai, 2007).   Industrial Fleet

The industrial fleet targets Farfantepenaeus notialis and F. subtilis. The industrial trawl  fishing gear and its rigging (otter boards, bridles, tickle chain) was slightly bigger in   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 239

dimensions  to  those  of  the  semi‐industrial  vessels,  except  in  the  case  of  the  former,  because of the outriggers; two equal nets are towed at each side.  Sea trials were conducted in the Gulf of Paria at depths of 3 – 8 fathoms and average  trawling  time  was  three  hours/set.  Fisheye  and  square  mesh  BRDs  were  tested  in  separate  sets.  The  same  fish  eye  and  netting  extension  used  in  the  semi‐industrial  trawler was installed in the starboard trawl net. A square mesh panel was inserted in  a netting extension of 30 by 120 meshes of 1–5/8 inches and was also installed in the  starboard trawl net. Due to the difference in catches and operational dimensions ob‐ served  between  the  trawls,  the  square  mesh  panel  was  also  tested  in  the  port  side  trawl net (Soomai, 2007).   Results Artisanal Fleet - Multifilament Net

Results  were inconclusive in  determining  the  effectiveness  of  the  gear  modification.  Overall, analysis of the data collected was inconclusive in determining the effective‐ ness  of  the  fisheye  and  the  square  mesh  panel  in  terms  of  bycatch  reduction.  There  was a 50% reduction in shrimp catch in the experimental net and the level of retained  fish did not increase in the experimental net compared with the control net.  Artisanal Fleet - Monofilament Net

There was a reduction in the capture of unwanted bycatch in the new monofilament  net with a 13% decrease in discarded bycatch to retained bycatch ratio and a 27% de‐ crease  in  the  discarded  bycatch  to  total  catch  ratio.  Larger  shrimp  catches  were  re‐ corded  however  smaller  sized  shrimp  were  caught  in  the  monofilament  net.  The  monofilament net was able to operate efficiently in a variety of water conditions and  at  the  speeds  of  2.5–3.0  knots.  Trawling  with  the  monofilament  net  was  more  fuel  efficient.  Semi-industrial Fleet

The  species  composition  was  generally  the  same  in  the  both  the  experimental  (fish  eye  installed)  and  control  nets.  The  data  collected  was  insufficient  to  determine  the  effectiveness of the fish eye in bycatch reduction. The double foot rope was discon‐ tinued since it was stirring up too much sediment as a result of the shallow area of  trawling operations.  Industrial Fleet

There was a 32% reduction in the average weight of the total catch in the experimen‐ tal net (fisheye or square mesh installed) and the shrimp to retained bycatch ratio was  estimated  at  1:1.  However  it  was  estimated  that  90%  of  the  bycatch  was  discarded  from both the control net and from the experimental net. Overall the data was unable  to provide a definite indication that the BRD was effective in reducing discarded by‐ catch.  Lessons Learnt The high discard levels from trawlers put the fishing industry at risk of being the tar‐ get  of  environmental  groups  making  themselves  vulnerable  to  attack  and  possible  closure of the fishery. Fishers need to become more responsible for their role in con‐ tributing to reduction of resources and take part in research into more environmen‐ tally friendly practices.    

240 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Technical assistance from Mexico and the FAO was integral in conducting gear trials.  Trinidad and Tobago needs to enhance its technical capabilities with regard to fishing  gear  technology  in  order  to  effectively  support  the  fishing  industry  through  future  testing and introduction of more efficient trawl gear.   The  formation  of  the  National  Steering  Committee  (NSC),  comprising  trawl  fishers  and  vessels  owners,  was  the  first  formal  exercise  to  involve  the  participation  of  the  fishing  industry  in  co‐management  of  fisheries  resources.  Involvement  of  fishers  in  research in collaboration with the government was an initial attempt at participatory  management.  There  is  an  increase  in  awareness  and  commitment  within  the  trawl  community towards future cooperation with fisheries authorities.  Data collection under Project EP/GLO/201/GEF helped to fill data gaps in the indus‐ trial trawl fishery. National stock assessments for whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias  furnieri) and lane snapper (Lutjanus synagris) were completed and showed the stocks  to be fully to over‐exploited (Soomai and Porch 2006; Yanagawa et al 2006). A study  on  the  importance  of  bycatch  and  discards  to  the  social  and  economic  wellbeing  of  associated  fishing  communities  was  also  completed  (Hutchinson  et  al.,  2007).  The  trawl industry plays a significant social role in maintaining livelihoods in these rural  communities.  Knowledge gained through the Project was used in the development of revised ma‐ rine  policy  and  fisheries  legislation  in  2006.  Issues  related  to  bycatch  and  discards  and the use of environmentally sensitive gear are listed as implementation strategies  under the government’s draft policy objectives to maintain ecosystem health and sus‐ tainable fisheries for the future.  Future Plans •

Conduct  additional  testing  of  the  monofilament  net,  fisheye  and  square  mesh panel BRDs to determine their effectiveness in reducing discards. 



Conduct  tests  on  the  semi‐industrial  and  industrial  fleets  using  new  nets  made of Dyneema netting and new otter boards as the experimental gear. 



Urgent  consideration  will  be  given  to  implementing  management  meas‐ ures  such  as  enforcing  areas  of  operation  as  prescribed  under  national  regulations,  since  the  artisanal  fleet  is  operating  in  very  shallow  waters.  Movement to deeper waters is expected to reduce the catch of juveniles, in  the absence of a BRD. 



Trinidad  and  Tobago  will  continue  to  participate  in  global  and  regional  initiatives aimed at reducing discards from the trawl fishery. 

References Hutchinson, S., Seepersad, G., Singh, R., Rankine, L. 2007. Study on the Socio‐Economic Impor‐ tance  of Bycatch  in  the  Demersal  Trawl  Fishery  for  Shrimp  in  Trinidad  and  Tobago.  De‐ partment  of  Agricultural  Economics  and  Extension,  Faculty  of  Science  and  Agriculture,  The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago.  Kuruvilla, S., Ferreira, L., Soomai, S., and Jacque, A. 2000. Economic performance and techno‐ logical features of marine capture fisheries: the trawl fishery of Trinidad and Tobago. Re‐ gional  Workshop  on  the  Effects  of  Globalization  and  Deregulation  on  Fisheries  in  the  Caribbean.  Castries,  St.  Lucia,  4  December,  2000.  Fisheries  Division,  Ministry  of  Agricul‐ ture, Land and Marine Resources, Trinidad and Tobago.  Kuruvilla,  S.,  Ferreira,  L.,  and  Soomai,  S.  2001.  National  Report  of  Trinidad  and  Tobago.  In  Tropical  shrimp  fisheries  and  their  impact  on  living  resources.  Shrimp  fisheries  in  Asia: 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 241

Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines; in the Near East: Bahrain and Iran; in Africa:  Cameroon,  Nigeria  and  the  United  Republic  of  Tanzania;  in  Latin  America:  Colombia,  Costa Rica, Cuba, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. FITT/C974. Food and Agriculture  Organization, Rome.  Ramjohn, D. 1995. Results of fisheries local knowledge survey in the Gulf of Paria. FAO/UNDP  Project  FI:DP/INT/91/007  “Integrated  Coastal  Fisheries  Management”.  Fisheries  Division,  Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources, Trinidad and Tobago.  Soomai,  S.,  and  Porch,  C.  2006.  The  status  of  lane  snapper  (Lutjanus  synagris)  resources  in  Trinidad and Tobago. In Technical Report of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism  (CRFM) 2nd Scientific Meeting, Port of Spain Trinidad, March 2006.  Soomai,  S.,  and  Seefoo,  A.  2006.  Report  of  Gear  Trials  conducted  by  the  Fisheries  Division,  Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources (MALMR) in collaboration with the  National  Fisheries  Institute  (INP),  Mexico,  November  12  –  25,  2006.  Project  EP/GLO/201/GEF  “Reduction  of  Environmental  Impact  from  Tropical  Shrimp  Trawling,  through the Implementation of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and Change of Manage‐ ment.”. Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources, Trinidad  and Tobago.  Soomai, S. 2007. Report of Gear Trials conducted by the Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agricul‐ ture,  Land  and  Marine  Resources  (MALMR)  in  collaboration  with  the  National  Fisheries  Institute  (INP),  Mexico,  May  21  –  31,  2007.  Project  EP/GLO/201/GEF“Reduction  of  Envi‐ ronmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling, through the Implementation of Bycatch  Reduction Technologies and Change of Management.”. Fisheries Division, Ministry of Ag‐ riculture, Land and Marine Resources, Trinidad and Tobago.  Soomai,  S.  2008.  Report  of  Trawl  Gear  Trials,  4  October  –  28  November,  2007.  Project  EP/GLO/201/GEF  “Reduction  of  Environmental  Impact  from  Tropical  Shrimp  Trawling,  through the Implementation of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and Change of Manage‐ ment.” Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources, Trinidad  and Tobago.  Yanagawa,  H.,  Ferreira,  L.,  Martin,  L.,  and  Soomai,  S.  2006.  Preliminary  data  analysis  of  two  fish  species in Trinidad  using  the  SPR  (Spawning  stock  biomass  Per  Recruit)  method.: 1.  Whitemouth  croaker  (Cro‐cro),  Micropogonias  furnieri;  2.  Lane  Snapper,  Lutjanus  synagris.  Produced  for  the  Project  for  the  Promotion  of  Sustainable  Marine  Fisheries  Re‐ source Utilisation, JICA. Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Re‐ sources, Trinidad and Tobago. 

Co lu mbia Maria Rueda and Farit Rico, Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Cosetras  ABSTRACT Quantification of the tropical shrimp trawling impact and mechanics to reduce it on  both Caribbean and Pacific coasts were evaluated. The methodological approach in‐ cluded  census  of  the  fishing  technology,  monitoring,  workshops,  trials  and  fishing  experiments. The census revealed that vessels and net designs are 30 years old. Fish‐ ing monitoring showed the following catch composition: shrimp 8%, incidental catch  27% and discards 65% for the Caribbean; while for the Pacific shrimp is 5%, inciden‐ tal catch is 43% and discards is 52%. In this sense new trawl nets were designed, in‐ troducing  new  netting  materials  and  BRDs  (fisheye  and  TED).  12  Trawl  nets  prototype were manufactured during 2 workshops, where 60 fishers were trained in  fishing trials. These trawl nets were used in fishing experiments comparing catches of  an  experimental  vessel  (using  prototype  nets)  with  those  of  a  control  vessel  (using  traditional nets) to test reduction of bycatch and fuel consumption if possible. For the   

242 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Caribbean  80  hauls  paired  showed  that  the  bycatch  was  reduced  as  follows  20%  (fisheye),  41%  (TED), 54 (fisheye  +  TED);  while  for  the  Pacific 240  hauls  showed  re‐ ductions of 28% (fisheye), 23% (TED) and 57% (fisheye + TED). In the Caribbean the  fuel saved was 17%, whereas on the Pacific the save was 25%. Current decrease of the  shrimps  stocks  and  high  fuel  prices,  are  part  of  the  issues  that  the  fishery  manage‐ ment agency in Colombia faces to change of management.  2000

Captura (t)

1500 1000 500 0 CO

CI

D

FA

Tipo de captura

 

Figura 1. Composición de la captura total (t) en la flota camaronera de aguas profundas del Pacífi‐ co colombiano. 

  Merito Cabezudo Marfilillo Zafiro

Captura incidental

Mero Pejerey Cherna Perla Peladilla Calamar Pargo Zafirillo

Toyo y Raya Lenguado Cagua Manteco Merluza 0

5

10

15

Captura (t)

20

25

 

Figura 2. Composición por productos de la captura incidental (t) desembarcada por la flota cama‐ ronera de aguas profundas del Pacífico colombiano. 

 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 243

Munida gracilipes

Descarte Total = 6.7 t

Selene peruviana Citharichthys spp. Merlucius angustimanus Squilla panamensis Coelorhincus canus

Taxa

Squilla biformis Solenocera agassizi Ophidium spp. Physiculus nematopus Porichthys margaritatus Trichiurus lepturus Heterocarpus vicarius Munida refulgens Scorpaena spp. 0

5

10

15

20

Captura (% en peso)

  Figura 3. Principales taxa del descarte en la flota camaronera de aguas profundas del Pacífico co‐ lombiano.  Hembras

a

Machos

350

TMM 300

Frecuencia

250 200 150 100 50 0

8.5

9

9.5

10 10.5 11 11.5 12 12.5 13 13.5 14 14.5 15 15.5 16 16.5 17 17.5 18

Longitud total (cm) Hembras

b Hembras

c

Machos

350

TMM

Machos

300

100

TMM

Frecuancia

250

Frecuencia

75

50

200

150

100

25 50

0

0 11

11.5

12

12.5

13

13.5

14

14.5

15

15.5

16

16.5

17

17.5

18

7

18.5

7.5

Longitud total (cm)

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

10.5

11

11.5

12

12.5

13

13.5

14

14.5

15

15.5

16

 

Longitud total (cm)

Figura 4. Distribuciones de frecuencias por sexo indicando la TMM. a) Farfantepenaeus breviros‐ tris; b) F. californiensis y c) Solenocera agassizi.  Costos Totales

Ingresos Totales

3000

Millones ($)

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 II

III

Bimestres

IV

 

Figura 5. Comportamiento bimensual de los costos y los ingresos totales de la flota camaronera de  aguas profundas en el Pacífico colombiano. El área entre las líneas representa la renta económica. 

 

244 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

80 70

CPUECO(kg/h)

60 50 40 30 20 10 Median 25%-75% Min-Max

0 III

IV

V

Bimestres

Figura 6. Abundancias por bimestres de captura objetivo CO. 

120

CPUE FACAP(kg/h)

100

80

60

40

20

0 III

IV

V

Bimestres

Figura 7. Abundancias por bimestres de la fauna acompañante del camarón de aguas profundas  (FACAP). Las barras de error denotan intervalos de confianza del 95%.  a 50

CPUECO(kg/h)

40

30

20

10

A

B

C

Estratos

b

125

CPUEFACAP(kg/h)

100

75

50

25

0 A

B

Estratos

C

 

Figura 8. Abundancias por estrato de profundidad de a) captura objetivo (CO) y b) fauna acompa‐ ñante del camarón de aguas profundas (FACAP). Las barras de error denotan intervalos de con‐ fianza del 95%. 

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 245

References Alverson, D., M.H. Freeberg, S.A. Murawski y J.G. Pope. 1994. A global assessment de fisheries  bycatch and discards. FAO Fish Tech. Pap. 339, Rome, 233 p.  Andrade, R. 2000. Evaluación de captura, esfuerzo y algunos parámetros poblacionales de los  camarones café (Farfantepenaeus californiensis) y rojo (Penaeus brevirostris) en el Pacífico co‐ lombiano. Tesis Universidad del Valle. 65 p.   Conapesca,  2005.  Noticias  Sagarpa.  http://www.conapesca.sagarpa.gov.mx 

Disponible 

en 

Internet. 

URL: 

De la Pava, M.L. y C. Mosquera. 2001. Diagnostico Regional de la Cadena Camarón de Pesca  en el Pacífico Colombiano. Documento Técnico presentado al Ministerio de Agricultura y  Desarrollo Rural. ACODIARPE, Buenaventura, 41 p.  Eayrs, S. 2007. Guía para Reducir la Captura Incidental (bycatch) en las Pesquerías por Arrastre  de Camarón Tropical. Edición revisada. FAO. Roma, 108 p.  EJF. 2003. Squandering the seas: How shrimp trawling is threatening ecological integrity and  food security around the world. Environmental Justice Foundation, London, 45 p.  FAO. 1995. Código de conducta para la pesca responsable. FAO. Roma, 46 p.   Fischer,  W.,  F.  Krupp.,  W.  Schneider.,  C.  Sommer.,  K.E.  Carpenter  y  V.H.  Niem.  1995.  Guía  FAO  para  la  identificación  de  las  especies  para  los  fines  de  la  pesca.  Pacífico  centro‐ oriental. Vol. I‐III. FAO. Roma, 1813 p.  Garcia, S.M. 1996. The precautionary to fisheries and its implication to fisheries research, tech‐ nology and management: an updated review. En “Precautionary Approach to Fisheries”.  Part 2. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. (350/2), 1–76.  INCODER. 2007. Resolución N° 2852 del 22 de diciembre de 2006. INCODER. Bogotá, 7 p.   Kelleher, K. 2005. Discards in the Worldʹs Marine Fisheries. An Update. FAO Fish. Tech. Pap.  470, Rome, 131 p.  Lewison, R.L., L.B. Crowder, A.J. Read y S.A. Freeman. 2004. Understanding impacts of fisher‐ ies bycatch on marine megafauna. TREE, 19: 598–604.  Madrid, N y W. Angulo. 2002. Evaluación biológico‐pesquera del recurso Camarón de Aguas  Profundas en el Pacífico Colombiano. Marzo 2001 – Febrero 2002. Informe Técnico. Agro‐ pesquera Bahía Cupica Ltda. Buenaventura, 70 p.  Madrid, N  y  M.  Rueda.  2007.  Análisis  para  la  estimación  de  cuotas  de pesca  del  camarón  de  aguas profundas en el Pacífico colombiano basado en registros históricos. Informe Técni‐ co. INVEMAR. Santa Marta, 17 p.  Morgan,  L.E  y  R.  Chuenpagdee.  2003.  Shifting  Gears.  Addressing  the  Collateral  Impacto  de  Fishing  Methods  in  U.S.  Waters.  Pew  science  series  on  conservation  and  the  environ‐ mental, Washington, 42 p.  Pauly, D y G.I. Murphy. 1982. Theory and management of tropical fisheries. ICLARM/CSIRO,  Manila.  Pineda, F.H. 1995. Biología del camarón de aguas someras Penaeus occidentalis, P. stylirostris,  y P. vannamei, en la Costa Pacífica colombiana. Documento Técnico del INPA. Buenaven‐ tura, 60 p.  Puentes,  V.,  N.  Madrid  y  L.  Zapata.  2007.  Catch  composition  of  the  deep  sea  shrimp  fishery  (Solenocera agassizi Faxon, 1893; Farfantepenaeus californiensis Holmes, 1900 and Farfan‐ tepenaeus brevirostris Kingsley, 1878) in the colombian Pacific ocean. Gayana. 71 (1): 84– 95.   Robertson, D.R y G.R. Allen. 2002. Peces costeros del Pacífico oriental tropical: Un sistema de  información.  Institutto  Smithsonian  de  Investigaciones  Tropicales,  Balboa,  República  de  Panamá. 

 

246 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Rueda, M., J.A. Angulo, N. Madrid, F. Rico y A. Girón. 2006. La pesca industrial de arrastre de  camarón en aguas someras del Pacífico colombiano: su evolución, problemática y perspec‐ tivas  hacia  una  pesca  responsable.  Instituto  de  Investigaciones  Marinas  y  Costeras  “José  Benito Vives De Andréis” ‐ INVEMAR. Santa Marta, 60 p.  Sagarpa. 2003. Informe del taller Nacional sobre selectividad de sistemas de pesca de arrastre  para  camarón.  Implicaciones  para  el  ordenamiento  pesquero.  Sagarpa‐Conapesca‐INP.  Mazatlán, Sinaloa, 32 p. Seijo,  J.C.,  O. Defeo  y  S.  Salas.  1998.  Fisheries  bioeconomics.  Theory,  modelling  and  manage‐ ment. FAO Fish. Tech. Pap. 368, Rome, 176 p.  Zapata,  L.A.,  G.  Rodríguez,  B.  Beltrán,  G.  Gómez,  A.  Cediel,  R.  Avila  y  C.  Hernández.  1999.  Evaluación de recursos demersales por el método de área de barrida en el Pacífico colom‐ biano. Bol. Cient. Del INPA, No. 6: 177–226. 

Venezuela Luis Maracano and Jose Alio, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agricola  Edif. (INIA), [email protected] and [email protected]  Abstract Discarded  by  catch  of  the  industrial  shrimp  fleet  in  Venezuela  is  about  60%  and  is  considered  a  major  environmental  impact  in  the  country.  Tests  were  conducted  to  reduce  discards  in  the  industrial  and  artisanal  shrimp  fleets.  The  industrial  shrimp  fishing is performed by 260 Florida type vessels, targeting shrimp and fish. The use of  TED is mandatory. Testing of bycatch reductions devices (BRD) like fish eye showed  a  significant  reduction  in  discards  but  also  severe  losses  of  commercial  catch.  The  square  mesh  panel  did  not  provide  significant  reductions  of  discards.  The  lower  or  lifted  lower  rope  rendered  an  average  25%  reduction  in  discards  and  no  significant  loss of commercial catch. The artisanal shrimp fishing is done with small trawls and  beach  seines.  The  former  was  modified  with  Nordmore  grid,  square  panel  and  fish  eye. Better results were obtained with the fish eye, which showed a reduction in dis‐ cards  close  to  70%,  but  a  30%  shrimp  loss  was  confronted.  Tests  of  BRDs  will  con‐ tinue after FAO‐GEF project ends in 2008, organizing workshops with fishers to show  construction and use of the devices, and sharing of results with researchers and fish‐ ers of countries in the region is to be promoted.  Introduction Discarded by catch in the Venezuelan fisheries has been assessed only in the shrimp  (Marcano  et  al.  2001)  and  tuna  long  line  fisheries,  although  preliminary  results  sug‐ gest that there could be significant amounts of discards in some artisanal and indus‐ trial purse seine tuna fisheries. The high proportion of bycatch in the trawl fisheries  gives evidence of a large environmental impact by this sector and casts a wrong im‐ age of the fishing industry to the general public. This could have induced drastic po‐ litical  measures  recently  taken  by  the  Venezuelan  Government  with  respect  to  trawling in the country. Since late 80’s there have been trials to promote selectivity in  the trawl fisheries. The assistance of the FAO‐GEF project on shrimp gear modifica‐ tion  and  the  technical  support  from  consultants,  allowed  a  fast  testing  of  different  alternatives of gear modifications or the introduction of gears from other parts of the  world on the local shrimp fishing, which improved significantly the efficiency of the  shrimp fishing sector and reduced its environmental impact.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 247

Methods The study was made in the five most important shrimp fishing grounds in the lower  Caribbean Sea: Lake Maracaibo estuary, Gulf of Venezuela, eastern platform, the Gulf  of  Paria  and  in  front  of  the  Orinoco  river  delta.  Each  shrimp  fishery  was  evaluated  with  respect  to:  fishing  gear  in  use,  operational  methods,  region  of  operations,  cap‐ tures,  landings,  and  commercial  and  discarded  by  catch.  Tests  on  the  industrial  shrimp trawling were conducted by trained observers on board of Florida type ves‐ sels, which use two nets, one on each side of the boat; one unmodified net served as  control.  The  use  of  TED  is  mandatory.  Three  modifications  were  tested,  fish  eye,  square mesh panel and double or lifted lower rope. TEDs were not used during ex‐ perimental  trawls.  Tests  on  artisanal  shrimp  fishing  included  the  modification  of  a  small  trawl  with  an  increase  mesh  size  in  the  sac, or  the  use  of  a  Nordmore  grid,  a  square  mesh  panel  or  the  fish  eye  in  the  sac.  Tests  in  the  artisanal  fleet  were  per‐ formed  using  several  vessels  operating  close  by  in  the  same  fishing  grounds,  one  group  with  traditional  nets  serving  as  control.  The  replacement  of  the  traditional  beach seine by the Suripera net from Mexico or by the bottom entangling net was also  tested.  Results The fleet of 260 industrial trawlers uses a similar type of net, semi‐balloon with two  covers, with 20/21 m upper/lower ropes that could go to 30/32 m depending on size  of vessel and engine power. There are about 10 stern trawlers targeting fish but were  not included in the study. The catch composition of the industrial trawl is about 4%  shrimp, 26% fish, molluscs and other crustaceans that are landed, and about 60% dis‐ cards. Fish eye in the industrial trawl induced reductions in discards of 40%, but also  losses  close  to  50%  in  average  of  the  commercial  catch  of  fish,  which  on  top  of  the  45%  loss  caused  by  the  use  of  the  TED,  makes  the device unacceptable  by  the  fleet.  The  square  mesh  panel  rendered  only  4%  reductions  in  discards,  but  there  were  problems in the rigging of the gear, so no conclusive results could be obtained with  this  device.  The  lower  double  rope  gave  consistent  results  with  an  average  25%  re‐ duction  in  discards  while  the  commercial  CPUE  was  maintained  or  improved.  The  artisanal shrimp trawl fishery in the Orinoco river delta and the lower eastern Carib‐ bean  Sea  operates  with  discards  of  nil  to  90%.  Tests  with  the  Nordmore  grid in  the  artisanal trawl fleet operating in the Orinoco river delta showed a severe clogging of  the  grid  with  the  large  load  of  debris  carried  by  the  river.  This  device  seems  to  re‐ quire cleaner waters to be used efficiently. The square mesh panel gave large shrimp  losses (beyond 40%) since the fishers leave the net lie slack on the bottom before re‐ trieving it on board after the tow. The fish eye placed at 1,5 m away from the knot in  the sac induced reductions of discards close to 70%, although the loss of shrimp could  be nil to 30%. Placing the fish eye closer to the end of the sac promoted shrimp loss,  and  further  away  from  it  did  not  render  significant  reductions  in  discards.  A  back‐ wash panel may have to be used behind the fish eye to prevent the escape of shrimp  through the BRD during the retrieval process of the catch. The mandatory use of fish  eye in the artisanal trawl and the lower rope in the industrial trawl is suggested and  may  be  included  in  the  fishing  regulations.  The  beach  seine  used  in  many  artisanal  shrimp  fisheries  is  not  amenable  to  structural  modifications  to  reduce  discards,  be‐ cause  shrimp  loss  cannot be  prevented.  There are  possibilities  to  replace  it  with  the  Suripera net tested in Lake Maracaibo, Gulf of Venezuela and eastern platform. Only  in  the  former  area  was  the  shrimp  density  large  enough  to  show  similar  shrimp  CPUE  values  with  respect  to  the  traditional  beach seine  nets (20  kg/h)  with 2%  dis‐ cards, while the beach seine has 80% discards. Unless shrimp density if very high, the   

248 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

CPUE of the Suripera net is too low due to the reduced swept area that is covered by  the gear. The bottom entangling net showed discards of 40% and a shrimp CPUE of  xx kg/h which also makes it a good system to replace the beach seine.  Lessons learned There  has  been  a  severe  lack  of  motivation  by  fishers  to  test  modifications  of  the  shrimp  trawl  gear  in  general  to  improve  its  selectivity  during  the  50+  years  of  the  shrimp fishery in Venezuela. This attitude could be a consequence of a castrating en‐ forcement of the fishing regulations. In large contrast, there were great changes in the  number  of  vessels  (from  200  in  1980  to  450  in  1990,  to  260  currently  in  operation),  fishing  power,  materials  for  net  construction  (replacing  PA  for  PE)  and  use  of  elec‐ tronics on board. The FAO‐GEF project provided an opportunity for all fishers to get  involved  in  the  solution  of  the  common  problem  of  the  large  discards  rate  in  the  shrimp fleet. It was also a means to improve the image of the fishing sector in front of  the general public, which may see the fishers as predators and destructors of the ma‐ rine environment. Fishers seem to be willing to incorporate better fishing practices to  their usual operations.  Future plans •

Complete validation tests of gear modification or introduction of new gear  in the artisanal shrimp fishing sector.  



Organize workshops with shrimp fisher’s communities along the country  to show the use of the new technology and demonstrate its use. 



Share results with colleagues and fishers from other countries in the region  in order to speed up regional results. 

References Marcano, L.A., Alió, J.J., Novoa, D., Altuve, D.E., Andrade, G., and Álvarez, R.A. 2001. Revi‐ sión de la pesca de arrastre en Venezuela. En: Tropical Shrimp Fisheries and their Impact  on  Living  resources.  FAO  Fisheries  Circular  974:  330–378,  Roma.  http://www.fao.org/docrep/007/y2859e/y2859e13.htm#1 

 

M e x i co Dr Miguel Angel Cisneros Mata, Instituto Nacional de Pesca, Mexico  1. Meetings of the National Steering Committee held :

a ) Mazatlan,  Sin.  August  2007.  Shrimp  Fishery  Technical  Working  Group.  b ) Mazatlán, Sin. September 2007. Committee on Fisheries and Aquacul‐ ture for the Pacific coast.  Progress of each national project activity PACIFIC COAST

A 10 day’s cruise onboard commercial vessel at the west coast of Baja California Pen‐ insula  face  operations  problems  since  there  was  a  huge  presence  of  a  crustacean  known as “langostilla” (Pleuroncondes planipes); trawls sets were rather short and non  representative in all shrimp fishing ground areas.   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 249

Due to engine brake‐down of BIP XI, an 8 days cruise for sea trials in the Upper Gulf  of California was made; results confirmed advantages of prototype RS‐INP‐MEX, in  previous  trials.  Comparison  of  bycatch  reduction  and  catch  efficiency  of  prototype  was possible since a set of traditional trawl nets were tested; all expenses were cov‐ ered by the Walton Foundation through WWF.  ATLANTIC COAST

Arrangements were made to use commercial trawlers for testing of new net designs  and  the  introduction  of  BRDs  at  Tampico,  Tamaulipas  and  Ciudad  del  Carmen,  Campeche.  Since  the  fleet composition and  technical  characteristic  of  trawl  nets  has  changed, a survey was carried out in those two ports, for data collection of 30 shrimp  trawlers.  Two  meetings  were  held  with  vessel  owners  from  the  Atlantic  coast,  where  the  stockholders asked to include testing of new otter boards (High Lift) used in the Pa‐ cific phase of the project, in order to achieve further fuel savings.  Due to lack of researchers it was decided that all sea trials were going to have place  during the shrimp ban of the Atlantic; cost of testing/fishing operations will be cover  by the stockholders, except DSA payment of researchers and new gear and devices.  Research for artisanal shrimp fisheries have started in the Upper Gulf of California in  order  to  reduce  the  impact  of  enmeshing  shrimp  nets  on  endemic  endangered  por‐ poise  (Vaquita);  also,  due  to  mixed  presence  of  juvenile  white  shrimp  (Litopenaeus  setiferus)  while  trawling  for  Sietebarbas  shrimp  (Xiphopenaeus  kroyeri),  a  new  project  will start in 2008 in the Atlantic coast, to introduce a new trawl net with short front  upper panel or no front upper panel.  Workshops, training, or demonstration activities undertaken During July two joint campaigns were carried out jointly with Cuba and Costa Rica,  in order to asses the accomplishments of both countries projects.  CUBA:

Locations: La Habana and Santa Cruz del Sur.  Activities:  Meeting  with  FAO‐Cuba  representatives;  Meeting  with  Authorities  from  Fisheries Research Center (CIP) and National Steering Committee; Meeting with di‐ rectors of the Santa Cruz del Sur Enterprise; Sea trials; report to Authorities from CIP  and Steering Committee.  COSTA RICA:

Main  activities  were  meeting  with  FAO‐Costa  Rica  Representative,  construction  of  devices  to  facilitate  testing  of  double  foot  rope  and  sea  trials  at  Gulf  of  Nicoya  on‐ board B/M CAPITÁN GERARD.  A total of 12 trawl sets were done to test fish‐eye, square mesh panel and double foot‐ rope.  SURIPERA WORKSHOP

From  20  –  27  November  an  international  workshop  was  held  at  Culiacan,  Sinaloa,  Mexico, with participants from Colombia (2), Costa Rica (1), Cuba (1), Philippines (2),  and  Mexico  (11).  Activities  include  design,  construction,  testing  and  fishing  opera‐ tions with suriperas. 

 

250 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

General comments on the current status of the shrimp-trawling industry

Although official statistics of shrimp fishery for 2006 and 2007 are not available yet, a  general overview of shrimp production is given in Figure 1 (2005 data is considered  still preliminary).  Total shrimp production has increased in the last 10 years, mainly due to the signifi‐ cant raise of shrimp farming production. Apparently industrial and artisanal shrimp  fishing is stable over the last 10 years; however there is a slight decrease for the in‐ dustrial fishing, mainly attributed to the Pacific. 

 

Figure 1. Shrimp production by origin. 

Data  of  shrimp  production  of  industrial,  artisanal  and  shrimp  farming  from  each  coast for 2005 are given in Table 1 and 2.  Table 1. Shrimp production by origin in the Pacific Coast.  Ton

%

Industrial 

28,734.0 

21.5 

Artisanal 

17,905.6 

13.4 

Aquaculture 

87,137.7 

65.1 

Total Pacific 

133,777.3 

100.0 

Table 2. Shrimp production by origin in the Atlantic Coast.  Ton

%

Industrial 

8,300.0 

33.9 

Artisanal 

13,285.3 

54.3 

Aquaculture 

2,903.4 

11.9 

Total Atlantic 

24,488.7 

100.0 

Number of trawlers in the Pacific coast has a very slight reduction; however, income  has been affected from catch reduction or international market price reduction.  In the Atlantic coast, there has been an important reduction of the number of shrimp  trawlers,  through  a  government  program  of  buying‐out  shrimp  licenses/trawlers.   

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 251

Catches per vessel have increase significantly over the last three years, as well as in‐ come;  although  some  fishing  grounds  have  been  closed,  economic  impact  to  stock‐ holders seems not to be important due to increased catches.  Some vessel owners in the Pacific coast that have participated in the project, are ap‐ plying for certification of “clean shrimp” or “green shrimp”, with USA shrimp bro‐ kers through some NGOs, in order to get a ”bonus” plus prices.  Process to certification of Suripera fishing operations will start during 2008, in order  to get a “clean shrimp” label.  Estimation of bycatch reduction: a ) Total Number of shrimp trawlers: Total number of trawlers is in proc‐ ess  of  actualization  since  the  program  to  reduce  fishing  effort  by  means of buying‐out commercial shrimp trawlers is still going on.  b ) Number of shrimp‐trawlers that used BRDs when the project started: 2  (only research vessels of INP)  c ) Number of shrimp‐trawlers currently using BRDs: Approximately 140,  mainly in the Pacific coast. 

N ig e ria James Ogboona, Nigerian Institute For Oceanography And Marine Research  (NIOMR), [email protected]  Introduction Nigeria  is  one  of  the  participating  countries  involved  in  GEF/UNEP/FAO  Shrimp  Fisheries  Project  titled:  ‘Reduction  of  Environmental  impact  from  Tropical  Shrimp  Trawling through the introduction of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and change of  management’. The main objective is the reduction of bycatch in shrimp fisheries.  Nigerian  Institute  for  Oceanography  and  Marine  Research,  (NIOMR)  Lagos  is  cur‐ rently  implementing  2  complementary  research  activities  in  the  Eastern  Gulf  of  Guinea sub region of West Africa on the following:  a ) The  development/adaptation  of  appropriate  bycatch  reduction  tech‐ nologies for the shrimp trawlers in Nigeria and Cameroon. This tech‐ nical part of the project involved the construction of prototype Bycatch  Reduction Devices (BRDs) and Turtle Excluder Device (TED) for fleet  testing  on  board  conventional  shrimp  vessels  in  Nigeria  and  Camer‐ oon. The awareness created has extended to other States in the sub re‐ gion including Togo Republic, Republic of Benin, Gabon, Sao Tome &  Principe and Equatorial Guinea.  b ) The  design  and  conduct  of  a  socio‐economic  survey  of  the  shrimp  trawl fisheries and the trading of their bycatch  The technical development/adaptation of reduction technologies Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs) are installed in the codend extension of shrimp trawl  nets as a management tool to reduce fishery related sea turtle mortality.  Trawl  nets  with  bycatch  reduction  devices  (BRDs)  are  also  constructed  in  order  to  mitigate the problem of juvenile and immature fish bycatch in shrimp trawling. 

 

252 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

The duo of TED and BRD in the same trawl net is expected to function perfectly well  and complement each other without any drastic reduction in the quantity of shrimps.  The data recorded during comparative demonstration trials of trawl nets fitted with  TED, BRD codends and the traditional square mesh codend, are shown in Table 1. As  shown  in  Table  2  the  results  of  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  indicated  that  there  was  no  significant  variation  in  the  mean  values  of  shrimps  caught  by  the  various  trawl net codends.  Table 1. Total catch by weight of fish and shrimp in hauls 1 – 4.  Species

Shrimp 

TED Only

T90

SMW

Trad

6.2 

11.8 

9.8 

9.5 

Com. Fish 

109.3 

125.3 

104.0 

109.0 

Trash 

91.0 

70.8 

112.0 

126.3 

Total 

206.5 

207.9 

225.8 

244.8 

TED Only

T90

SMW

Trad

Shrimp 

65.0% 

120.0% 

103.0% 

100% (9.5kg) 

Com. Fish 

100.0% 

115.0% 

95.4% 

100.0% (109.0kg) 

Trash 

72.0% 

56.0% 

88.7% 

100.0% (126.3kg) 

Total 

84.4% 

84.9% 

92.2% 

100% 

  Table 1a. Catch by weight (% of traditional).  Species

  Table 1b. Catch by category within tow (% of total catch per tow).  Species

 

 

TED Only

T90

SMW

Trad

Shrimp 

3.0% 

5.7% 

4.4% 

3.9% 

Com. Fish 

52.9% 

60.3% 

46.0% 

44.5% 

Trash 

44.0% 

34.0% 

49.6% 

51.6% 

Total 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 253

Table  2.  ANOVA  Table  on  shrimps  caught  by  trawl  nets  fitted  with  TED,  BRD  or  Traditional  diamond mesh codend during demonstration trials.  Variations

Degree of Freedom

SS

F

SSB=8.4675 

R‐1=3 

2.8225 

3.071 

SSW=11.03 

A‐R=12 

0.9192 

 

SST=19.4975 

15 

 

 

F TAB (3,12) 

P0.05=3.49 

0.01 (3,12) = 5.95 

 

  ANOVA  showed  no  significant  difference  (P>0.05)  between  the  shrimps  caught  by  the various trawl net codends. This is an indication that there will be no drastic loss  of shrimps if the devices are properly installed and operated.  U.S.A. experts inspected the Fishing Companies in Nigeria in September 2007 to de‐ termine the degree of TED compliance by the Industrial fishermen as well as the en‐ forcement  strategies  of  the  Federal  Department  of  Fisheries.  This  was  undertaken  with a view to extend the certificate of TED compliance till 2009.   Workshops on the designs and construction/fabrication of bycatch reduction devices  including square mesh windows (SMW), 90° turned (gentle) codend and square mesh  codend  (SMC)  were  conducted  at  the  premises  of  Fishing  Companies.  The  target  groups included mainly captains, net makers, deck hands and managers.  The number of participants during the 2‐day workshop per company is as follows:  

F ISHING  C OMPANIES  

D ATE  

N O .  OF PARTICIPANTS  

Atlantic Shrimpers Ltd 

2–23 August 2007 

18 

Barnarly Fisheries Ltd 

24–25 August 2007 

16 

Honeywell Fisheries 

26–27 August 2007 

10 

United Fisheries Ltd 

28–29 August 2007 

16 

Karflex Fisheries Ltd 

4–5 September 2007 

12 

The  workshops  conducted  earlier  at  Taraboz  Fisheries  Ltd  and  ORC  Fisheries  in‐ cluded 32 and 18 participants respectively.  The adaptation rate of BRD codends of about 65% was more in favour of square mesh  window  (SMW).  During  the  period  July  –  December  2007,  Atlantic  Shrimpers  Lim‐ ited  (ASL)  completed  the  construction  of  a  total  of  about  280  SMW  codends  i.e.  4  codends per vessel for about 70 shrimp trawlers owned by the industry.  It should be recalled that the recertification of Nigeria for TED compliance and per‐ mission to sell all categories of shrimps to USA markets rekindled the interest of the  Industrial Fishermen in Cameroon, Gabon and other member states in the sub region  in  order  to  enjoy  the  same  opportunity  and  benefit  of  higher  prices  for  shrimp  ex‐ ports. Therefore there is the need for technology transfer in terms of capacity building  and skills acquisition on the design, construction and operation of TED and BRD by   

254 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

the  participating  States  in  order  to  achieve  this  objective  and  bring  about  uniform  regime of application and enforcement of the relevant fisheries laws and regulations  in  the  sub  region.  The  same  issue  was  highlighted  in  the  draft  convention  that  was  reviewed in Douala Cameroon between 19 and 20 December 2007 and at the various  meetings that were convened on harmonization of the fisheries laws and regulations  and  the  collaboration  on  the  use  of  closely  coordinated  vessels  monitoring  system  (VMS) in the sub‐region.   In  the  light  of  the  above,  Dr.  B.B.  Solarin  participated  in  the  Gabon  workshop  con‐ ducted  under  the  auspices  of  National  Oceanographic  Atmospheric  Administration  (NOAA)  of  the  United  States.  The  workshop  was  convened  to  share  experiences  in  implementation of TEDs and other management solutions to reduce sea turtle mortal‐ ity in shrimp trawl nets. There was an oral presentation of the Nigerian experience.  The workshop also included practical demonstrations on TED construction as well as  demonstration trials at sea to test the performance on board commercial vessel. It cre‐ ated a lot more awareness among the Gabonese industrial fishermen, Managers and  Administrators.  It  was  observed  that  it was  important  and  desirable  to  maintain  an  optimum grid angle of 55 degrees in order to improve TED performance. 

C a m e ro o n Oumarou NJIFONJOU, IRAD‐SRHOL PMB 77 Limbe, CameroonTel: +237 77  61 91 49; Email: [email protected]  INTRODUCTION In Africa, the project concerns Nigeria and Cameroon waters. This area has vast fish‐ eries  resources,  which  are  critical  to  the  food  security  of  the  region,  but  which  are  currently  severely  threatened  by  over  fishing,  urban  runoff  and  offshore  petroleum  exploitation. The project is under the supervision of the Fisheries Department and is  implemented  in  Cameroon  by  the  Fisheries  and  Oceanography  Research  Station  (SRHOL).  The  Artisanal  shrimp  fisheries  utilizes  more  than  1000  fishermen  and  for  the moment the Industrial sub sector has 41 registered shrimp trawlers from Nigeria  and 30 based in Douala. Most of these vessels are shrimp trawlers with small mesh  sizes and this inevitably results in large quantities of juveniles. Bycatch and trash fish  constitute mostly 95% of the products caught and 75% of the finfish landed are juve‐ niles caught before first maturity.   The increase of the shrimp fishing effort over the years, the high level of fish caught  by shrimp trawlers, the continue reduction of the sizes of fish landed, the high price  of fish on the markets and the political will to conserve and sustain the fisheries re‐ sources  are  the  main  motivation  for  the  establishment  of  bycatch  reduction  legisla‐ tion/regulations.  In  the  new  fisheries  Law  to  be  promulgated,  BRDs  and  TEDs  utilization has been introduced as one of the basic requirements for the license appli‐ cation.  National Plan of Action for bycatch management and discard reduction

The  objectives  and  activities  of  the  overall  national  plan  of  action  for  bycatch  man‐ agement and discard reduction are here summarized:  Objectives



 

Ongoing evolution of the commercial shrimp‐trawling fisheries, with esti‐ mation of fishing efforts and landings; 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



Typical  rate  of  shrimp‐catch,  bycatch  and  discards  made  over  an  annual  cycle by the commercial shrimp‐trawling fleet, both before, and after adop‐ tion of Bycatch Reduction Devices (BRDs) by the vessels; 



Socioeconomic  changes  and  good  governance  which  may  be  brought  about by the adoption of BRDs in the commercial shrimp‐trawling fleets.  

| 255

Activities



On‐board sampling/Observer program (data collection up to the end of the  project); 



Field demonstration of new technologies developed/adapted (workshops); 



Introduction  of  appropriate  BRD  and  TED  technology  to  shrimp‐fishing  fleets; 



Establishment  of  an  appropriate  database  from  data  collected  progres‐ sively by observers; 



Dissemination and extension of the results achieved;  



Promulgation of the new fisheries law; 



Management  of  the  vessel  Monitoring  System  (VMS)  already  installed  in  the vessels operating in Cameroon; 



The  study  on  socio‐economic  impact  of  the  By–catch  trade  in  Cameroon  should  continue  particularly  data  collection  and  provision  of  alternative  means of livelihood; 



Data analysis and final reporting. 

Sea trials demonstration

The  sea  trips  organized  during  the  last  workshop  (April  07)  were  undertaken  on  board the commercial vessel belonging to PGT fishing company based in Douala and  freely  offered  for  the  occasion  (in  kind  contribution  of  the  private  sector).  The  PGT  stern trawler used was a shrimper rigged with four nets, a quad rig, fishing simulta‐ neously as in Nigeria. This permitted comparative testing for the TED and BRD’s at  the  same  time.  The  four  traditional  trawls  were  modified  from  left  to  right  as  TED  only outside, T 90 codend inside for the Port side, and for the Starboard side, Square  mesh window inside and Traditional codend outside, and 3 hauls, each of two hours  trawling were made and catches from different codends compared.   It should be noted that the BRD codends tested during the trials were left to the PTG  vessel to be tested continuously.   Results of the sea trials The  catch  composition  included  mainly  the  croakers  (Scianidae),  sole  (Cynoglossi‐ dae),  thread‐fins  (Polymenidae),  shad,  ethmalosa  (Clupeidae),  silver  fish  (Trichiuri‐ dae), and shrimps (penaeidae) notably Penaeus notialis, P. kerathurus and Parapenaeus  atlanticus.  The  catch  composition  was  sorted  into  three  major  categories:  Shrimps,  Fish  of  commercial  value,  Thrash  fish  or  discards  (constituted  mainly  of  juvenile,  immature fish species and small pelagic).  The catch composition by weight is shown in Table 1 (first trip) and Table 2 (second  trip) below.  

 

256 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

Table 1. First trip: Fish composition by weight (kg) of trawl net codend (% of traditional).  Catch by Weight (kg)

Rig 

TED only 

T90 

Sq Window 

Traditional 

Shrimp 

2.4 

2.0 

2.0 

2.0 

Commercial 

20.3 

0.5 

20.0 

12.0 

Trash 

48.0 

5.0 

43.0 

45.0 

Total 

70.7 

7.5 

65.0 

59.0 

  Catch by Weight (% of Traditional)

Rig 

TED only 

T90 

Sq Window 

Traditional 

Shrimp 

120% 

100% 

100% 

2.0 

Commercial 

169% 

4% 

166.7% 

12.0 

Trash 

107% 

11% 

95.6% 

45.0 

Total 

120% 

13% 

110.2% 

59.0 

Catch by Category (% of Traditional)

Rig 

TED only 

T90 

Sq Window 

Traditional 

Shrimp 

3% 

27% 

3.1% 

2.0 

Commercial 

29% 

7% 

50% 

12.0 

Trash 

68% 

67% 

13.9% 

45.0 

Total 

 

 

2.1% 

59.0 

Table 2. Second trip: Fish composition by weight (kg) of trawl net codend.  Catch by Weight (kg)

Rig 

TED only 

Shrimp 

T90 

Sq Window 

Traditional 

6.2 

11.8 

9.8 

9.5 

Commercial 

109.3 

125.3 

104.0 

109.0 

Trash 

91.0 

70.8 

112.0 

126.3 

Total 

206.5 

207.9 

225.8 

244.8 

  After analysis of the tables, the following points were observed and discussed:  

 



The reduction in the shrimp catch in the TED may relate to a problem of  the way the TED was deployed – possibly upside down or more likely as  mentioned under point 4.. More work on this may improve that catch. 



During  the  retrieval  of  the  gear,  the  vessel  must  maintain  some  forward  speed. 



The square mesh window may require a larger mesh to further reduce the  catch of unwanted fish. 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008



The selvedge line that picks up codends should be extended further as in‐ structed before the trial to compensate for the increased 3 m length in the  TED codend. 



Shortening the length of net and placing the TED further forward may im‐ prove the stability and reduce any loss of shrimp. However, care should be  exercised to not shorten the net too much particularly if the escape open‐ ing is faced downward. 

| 257

2007 – 2008 activities in bycatch management Two National Steering Committee meeting (NSCM) were held this year in Douala (5  April and 8 September 2007. These meetings were reduced to only key members plus  some industrial fishermen because of funding.   The points discussed during the meetings were:   •

To prepare the organization of the 4th MCS meeting in Douala; 



To  officially  discuss  the  points  of  collaboration  between  Cameroon  and  Nigeria; 



To  inform  and  sensitize  the  fishing  Companies  on  the  new  regulation  in‐ cluding  the  use  of  BRDs/TEDs  in  Cameroon,  and  to  present  to  them  the  need of harmonizing the fisheries laws and regulations in the sub‐region; 



To  discuss  on  the  future  of  the  project  knowing  that  it  is  ending  in  June  2008; 



To  present  the  result  of  the  study  carried  on  the  survey  of  the  economic  performance indicators of fishing companies; 

The National coordinators participated to two MCS meetings organized in Lagos in  March and June 2007. A training workshop on BRDs and TEDs also held in Douala 16  to 21 April 2007. Prototypes have been exhibited to the public, their functioning ex‐ plained  and  some  fishermen  trained  on  how  to  build  the  devices.  Practical/  Train‐ ings/Demonstrations/Sea‐Trials  on  TEDs  and  BRDs  have  been  also  organized  on  board a commercial vessel in Limbe. Two kinds of BRDs, the Square mesh window  codend  and  the  90°mesh  codend  were  tested  successful,  compared  to  a  traditional  codend and to the codend equipped with TED.   The 4th MCS meeting on the Harmonization of Fisheries Laws and Regulations within  the  Southern Gulf  of  Guinea  States  held  in  Douala Cameroon,  hosted  jointly by  the  “Caisse de Développement de la pêche maritime” and the Research Centre for Fisher‐ ies and Oceanography (SRHOL‐IRAD on 19 to 20 December 2007. It is important to  recall here that the main purpose of these series of MCS meetings is to establish the  framework for the establishment and harmonization of marine fisheries Monitoring,  Control  and  Surveillance  (MCS)  procedures  and  enforcement  processes  within  the  Southern  Gulf  of  Guinea.  The  aim  is  to  eliminate  all  forms  of  unwholesome  fishing  practices including Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing.   The  first  three  sessions  were  held  in  Lagos,  while  the  last  one  was  organized  in  Douala Cameroon. A total of twenty four participants attended the meeting. This in‐ cludes  twelve  (12)  official  delegates  from  Benin,  Togo,  Nigeria,  Gabon,  Equatorial  Guinea and Cameroon, ten (10) observers from MINEPIA and IRAD and 2 FAO offi‐ cers  from  Yaoundé  and  Rome.  A  draft  Convention  was  also  discussed.  Participants  were committed to carry out the necessary consultations within their States in order  to obtain a national consensus on the draft convention under scrutiny. Member States  also  adopted  that  the  same  Argos  facilities  and  equipment  currently  being  used  by   

258 |

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

the countries within the Initiative that already established their VMS for uniformity  and  cost  effectiveness.  A  survey  of  the  economic  performance  indicators  of  fishing  companies  has  been  carried  out  in  on  fishing  companies  and  the  results  presented  during the MCS workshop held in Douala.   Lessons learned and future activities Lessons learned



Necessity for a close cooperation with Nigeria (from the very beginning of  the  project  and  recently  on  harmonization  of  fisheries  legislation  for  the  whole region started on the initiatives of the two countries. 



The familiarization with TED and BRDs on Nigerian vessels; There is hope  now  that  the  collaboration  with  Nigeria  for  the  implementation  of  the  BRDs  and  TEDs  in  the  shrimp  fishery  will  help  the  country  organize  its  fishery sector.  



The  creation  of  the  initiative  called  the  Sub‐Regional  Cooperation  in  Ma‐ rine Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance in the Southern Gulf of  Guinea; 



The possibility for Cameroon to export its shrimp products to US. The re‐ certification of  Nigerian fishing  products  for  the  US market  has  naturally  trickled  an  interest  from  the  fishing  Industry  in  Cameroon  to  also  obtain  the  certification  and  with  this  –  an  opportunity  to  benefit  from  higher  prices on the shrimp products. 

Future activities



Effective introduction and implementation of BRDs and TEDs in the Cam‐ eroon fisheries industry;  



12  months  BRD  and  TED  experimentation,  on‐board  sampling/Observer  program (data collection using commercial vessels); 



Study on socio‐economic impact of the By–catch trade in Cameroon should  continue particularly data collection and provision of alternative means of  livelihood; 



Training  of  Trawler‐owners/skippers,  technical  staff  and  other  stake‐ holders  on  BRDs  and  TEDs  Devices  building,  and  fishing  gear  construc‐ tion. 



Collaboration of Delegates to engender a uniform approach among mem‐ ber states in the sustainable management of the living marine resources of  the Sub‐region; 



Organization  of  the  5th  MCS  meeting  in  Gabon.  For  this  purpose  FAO  should  translate  the  Draft  Convention  into  French  with  copies  sent  to  member countries before the next meeting, for a better understanding and  participation of member countries; 

References Akande,  G.  1998.  Bycatch  Utilization  in  Nigeria.  In:  Ivor  Clucas  (NRI)  and  Frans  Teutscher  (FAO): Report and Proceedings of FAO/DFID Expert Consultation on Bycatch Utilization  in Tropical Fisheries, Beijing, China, 21–28 September1998; pp 241–251.  Alverson,  D.L.,  Freeberg,  M.H.,  Pope,  J.G.,  and  Murawski,  S.A.  1994.  A  global  assessment  of  fisheries bycatch and discards. FAO Fisheries Technical paper, 339, 233.  

 

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008

| 259

Bayagbona,  E.O.,  Sagua,  V.O.,  and  Afinowi,  M.A.  1971.  A  survey  of  the  shrimp  resources  of  Nigeria. Marine Biology, 11 (2): 178–189.   Clucas, I.,  and Teutscher,  F.  1998.  Report  and  Proceedings of  FAO/DFID Expert  Consultation  on Bycatch Utilization in Tropical Fisheries, Beijing, China, 21–28 September1998; 329p.  Diakite,  B.  1998.  Bycatch  in  Marine  fisheries  in  Senegal.  In:  Ivor  Clucas  (NRI)  and  Frans  Teutscher  (FAO):  Report  and  Proceedings  of  FAO/DFID  Expert  Consultation  on  Bycatch  Utilization in Tropical Fisheries, Beijing, China, 21–28 September1998; pp 235–239.  Hall, M.A. 1996. On bycatches. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, 6; 319–352.  Njifonjou, O. 1998a. The Awasha fishing fleet in the Cameroon coastal area: profitability analy‐ sis of the purse seine unit activity. 1998 IIFET Int. Conf. Proc.  Njifonjou,  O.  1998b.  Dynamique  de  l’exploitation  dans  la  pêche  artisanale  des  régions  de  Limbe et de Kribi au Cameroun. Thèse de Doctorat , Université de Bretagne Occidentale,  347p.  Njock, J.C., Njifonjou, O. 2004. L’utilisation des captures accessoires de la pêche crevettière au  Cameroun : Rapport de l’atelier international sur la pêche crevettière dans le golfe de Gui‐ née ; Douala, 12–14 février 04.  Legaspi,  S.,  S.A.  1998.  Bycatch  Utilization  in  Philippines.  In:  Ivor  Clucas  (NRI)  and  Frans  Teutscher  (FAO):  Report  and  Proceedings  of  FAO/DFID  Expert  Consultation  on  Bycatch  Utilization in Tropical Fisheries, Beijing, China, 21–28 September1998; pp 105–113. 

 

Loading...

(WGFTFB). - ICES

ICES WGFTFB REPORT 2008 ICES F ISHERIES T ECHNOLOGY C OMMITTEE ICESCM 2008/FTC:02 R EF . WGECO Report of the ICES-FAO Working Group on Fish Technolog...

2MB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

ICES '90,rev - Space Architect
industrial and sociotechnical context in which they evolved. .... from the quality of work life (QWL), occupational heal

Professional Letter - ICES
Feb 14, 2017 - Subject: Data call 2017: Landings, discards, biological sample and effort data from 2016 in .... some can

IOS2014 Book of Abstracts - ICES
Oct 24, 2014 - Invited speaker - Simon Thorrold Senior Scientist, Biology Department, Woods Hole. Oceanographic Institut

MODPROD Workshops Febr 2017 - ICES - The
Feb 7, 2017 - CFP: OpenModelica/MODPROD Workshops Febr 2017. Technical co-sponsor: IEEE Computer Society Swedish Chapter

(WGFTFB). - Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
A summary of the status of knowledge and future directions in research and application on the behaviour and species sepa

Report of the ICES Advisory Committee on Fishery Management, 1999
236. Report of the ICES Advisory Committee on. Fishery Management, 1999. Copenhagen, 12-20 May 1999. Copenhagen, 26 Octo

From New Atlantis to New Alliance: Science, Governance - ICES
The title refers to Francis Bacon and his utopian New Atlantis project and to Elia ...... In summary, if we consider the

ICES-2017 - Faculty of Education - Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
KEYNOTE 1. BREAKING BOUNDARIES: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN THE GLOBAL AND THE LOCAL IN EDUCATION. Assoc. Prof Dr Lucy Bailey.

Modeling the processing of interstellar ices by energetic particles
Jun 13, 2013 - Rph = Fp 〈πα2 g〉 . (10). The desorption yield Y is taken as 0.1, Fp is photon flux,. 4875 cm−2sâˆ

Manual for the International Bottom Trawl Surveys - Ices
annually with the objective of obtaining annual recruitment indices for the combined. North Sea herring stocks. Graduall