Developer's Guide - Honeywell AIDC

Loading...

IPL

Intermec Printer Language

Developer’s Guide

Intermec Technologies Corporation Worldwide Headquarters 6001 36th Ave.W. Everett, WA 98203 U.S.A. www.intermec.com The information contained herein is provided solely for the purpose of allowing customers to operate and service Intermec-manufactured equipment and is not to be released, reproduced, or used for any other purpose without written permission of Intermec Technologies Corporation. Information and specifications contained in this document are subject to change without prior notice and do not represent a commitment on the part of Intermec Technologies Corporation. © 2007-2009 by Intermec Technologies Corporation. All rights reserved. The word Intermec, the Intermec logo, Norand, ArciTech, Beverage Routebook, CrossBar, dcBrowser, Duratherm, EasyADC, EasyCoder, EasySet, Fingerprint, INCA (under license), i-gistics, Intellitag, Intellitag Gen2, JANUS, LabelShop, MobileLAN, Picolink, Ready-to-Work, RoutePower, Sabre, ScanPlus, ShopScan, Smart Mobile Computing, SmartSystems, TE 2000, Trakker Antares, and Vista Powered are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Intermec Technologies Corporation. There are U.S. and foreign patents as well as U.S. and foreign patents pending. Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

ii

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Document Change Record This page records changes to this document. The document was originally released as version -001. Version Number

Date

Description of Change

003

9/2009

Revised to add new printer support.

002

12/2007

Revised to add references to the PB50 and the communications commands.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

iii

iv

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Contents

Contents Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Global Services and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Warranty Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Web Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Telephone Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Service Location Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Who Should Read This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x

1 Introduction to IPL Commands

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

What Is IPL? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Which Printers Support IPL? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 About IPL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Printing Labels with IPL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Learning the Structure of IPL Command Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Using ASCII Control Characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Creating Command Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Sending IPL Commands to the Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Switching Between Printer Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

2 Designing Bar Code Labels

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Introduction to Label Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 About Field Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Human-Readable Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Bar Code Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Line and Box Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 User-Defined Character or Graphic Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Working With Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Editing Field Zero (H0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Numbering Fields in a Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 About Interpretive Fields and Field Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Editing Existing Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Deleting Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Positioning Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Rotating Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Scaling Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Magnifying Fonts and Character Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Magnifying Bar Code Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

v

Contents

Specifying Data for Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Example of Constant Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Example of Changing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Example Using the “Next Data Entry Field, Select” Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Working With RFID Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 How to Write Data to an RFID Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 How Data is Stored on an RFID Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Writing Hex or ASCII Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Writing Numerical Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Creating a Sample Label Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Positioning Fields in a Label Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Creating Command Strings for the Label Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Printing the Sample Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Complex Label Design Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Example with Lines and Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Example with Graphics and Rotated Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 RFID Tag Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

3 Working with Fonts and Graphics

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Learning About Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 About Bitmap Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 About Outline Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Choosing a Font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Downloading Fonts to the Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Using PrintSet to Download Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Using IPL Commands to Download Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Downloading Bitmap Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Downloading Outline Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Using TrueType Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Selecting the Printer Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 TrueType Fonts and Memory Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Installing Asian Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Installing Code Page Tables for Asian Scalable Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Installing Asian Bitmap Fonts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Licensing Your Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Creating Bitmap Fonts From TrueType Fonts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Creating User-Defined Characters and Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Creating User-Defined Characters for Emulation Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Creating User-Defined Fonts for Emulation Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Creating User-Defined Characters for Advanced Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Creating User-Defined Font Characters for Advanced Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

vi

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Contents

4 Advanced Printer Programming

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

Using the Printer Memory Efficiently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 How Is the Printer Storage Memory Used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Making the Most of Your Storage Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Reimaging Modified Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Using Emulation Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Using Legacy Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Using Direct Graphics Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 What Is Run-Length Encoding? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Immediate Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Compression Encoding Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Low Order Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 High Order Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Bitmap Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Example of Direct Graphics Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Designing Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

5 Troubleshooting

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Troubleshooting Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 How the Printer Handles Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Syntax Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Parameter Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Image Overrun Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Invalid Numeric Character Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Insufficient Storage Memory Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Interpreting Error Codes and Solving Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Printing Labels with 86XX-Compatible Code 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

A Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

Full ASCII Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Full ASCII Control Characters Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 International Character Sets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Advanced Character Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 86XX Character Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 IBM Translation Character Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Code Page 850 Character Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

vii

Contents

Extended Character Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Characters in Fonts c0, c1, c2, and c7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Characters in Fonts c20, c21, and c22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Characters in Font c23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Characters in Font c24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Characters in Fonts c25, c26 and c28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86

B User-Defined Interface Tables

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87

Print Commands (t = 0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Escape Print Commands (t = 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Shift Print Commands (t = 2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Status Responses and Auto-Transmit Commands (t = 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Protocol Commands (t = 4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Communications Protocol Characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93

I Index

viii

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Before You Begin

Before You Begin This section provides you with safety information, technical support information, and sources for additional product information.

Safety Information Your safety is extremely important. Read and follow all warnings and cautions in this document before handling and operating Intermec equipment. You can be seriously injured, and equipment and data can be damaged if you do not follow the safety warnings and cautions. This section explains how to identify and understand cautions and notes that are in this document. A caution alerts you to an operating procedure, practice, condition, or statement that must be strictly observed to prevent equipment damage or destruction, or corruption or loss of data. Note: Notes either provide extra information about a topic or contain special instructions for handling a particular condition or set of circumstances.

Global Services and Support Warranty Information To understand the warranty for your Intermec product, visit the Intermec web site at www.intermec.com and click Support > Returns and Repairs > Warranty. Disclaimer of warranties: The sample code included in this document is presented for reference only. The code does not necessarily represent complete, tested programs. The code is provided “as is with all faults.” All warranties are expressly disclaimed, including the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.

Web Support Visit the Intermec web site at www.intermec.com to download our current manuals (in PDF). To order printed versions of the Intermec manuals, contact your local Intermec representative or distributor. Visit the Intermec technical knowledge base (Knowledge Central) at intermec.custhelp.com to review technical information or to request technical support for your Intermec product.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

ix

Before You Begin

Telephone Support In the U.S.A. and Canada, call 1-800-755-5505. Outside the U.S.A. and Canada, contact your local Intermec representative. To search for your local representative, from the Intermec web site, click About Us > Contact Us.

Service Location Support For the most current listing of service locations, click Support > Returns and Repairs > Repair Locations. For technical support in South Korea, use the after service locations listed below: AWOO Systems 102-1304 SK Ventium 522 Dangjung-dong Gunpo-si, Gyeonggi-do Korea, South 435-776 Contact: Mr. Sinbum Kang Telephone: +82-31-436-1191 E-mail: [email protected] IN Information System PTD LTD 6th Floor Daegu Venture Center Bldg 95, Shinchun 3 Dong Donggu, Daegu City, Korea E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]

Who Should Read This Manual This document explains how to use the Intermec Printer Language (IPL) to program Intermec printers. Before you use IPL, you should be familiar with your network, general networking terms, such as IP address, and your bar code label printers. For information on specific IPL commands, see the Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Command Reference Manual.

Related Documents The Intermec web site at www.intermec.com contains our documents (as PDF files) that you can download for free. To download documents 1 Visit the Intermec web site at www.intermec.com. 2 Click Support > Manuals. 3 Use the Product Category field, the Product Family field, and the Product field to help you locate the product whose documentation you want to download.

x

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

1 Introduction to IPL Commands

This chapter introduces the Intermec Printer Language (IPL) and includes these topics: •

What Is IPL?



Which Printers Support IPL?



About IPL Commands



Printing Labels with IPL Commands



Learning the Structure of IPL Command Strings



Sending IPL Commands to the Printer



Switching Between Printer Operating Modes

1

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

What Is IPL? Intermec Printer Language (IPL) is one of the programming languages that has been developed for use with Intermec printers. IPL is an easy-to-use programming language that lets you: •

design formats (templates) for bar code labels, download formats to the printer, or modify formats stored in the printer.



download data to fill in a bar code label (or RFID tag information) and print the label.



enable or disable printer features and options, or abort print jobs and reset the printer.



query the printer for hardware diagnostic data and status of print jobs.

This Developer’s Guide includes information on how to use IPL to develop applications for your Intermec printer. For information on specific IPL commands, see the IPL Command Reference Manual.

Which Printers Support IPL? IPL is supported by these Intermec printers: •

3240, 3400, 3440, 3600, 4100, 4400, 4420, 4440, 4630, 4830, 7421, PC41



F2, F4



PD/PF/PM/PX series: PD41, PD42, PF2i, PF4i, PM4i, PX4i, PX6i



PB series: PB20, PB21, PB22, PB31, PB32, PB50, PB51

The PD series supports IPL v10.0 and later. The PF/PM/PX series support IPL v2.0 and later. The PB50 supports IPL v11.0 and later. Other Intermec printers support earlier versions of IPL. To locate the correct IPL version for your printer, visit www.intermec.com, choose Support > Downloads, and choose your printer from the list.

About IPL Commands There are six types of IPL commands:

2



Communications commands set printer communications parameters for 802.1x, Bluetooth, Serial, and Wired and Wireless LAN communications.



Print commands download data to the printer, print bar code labels or RFID tag labels, or pass data to RFID tag formats. The printer must be placed in Print mode to use these commands.



Program commands send label format information to the printer. RFID program commands create and define tag fields and data sources. The printer must be in Program mode to use these commands.



Configuration commands enable or disable printer features and options. The printer must be in Print mode to use these commands.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands



Test and Service commands query the printer for hardware diagnostic data and print job status. The printer must be in Test and Service mode to use these commands.



Immediate commands abort print jobs, return the status of print jobs, and reset the printer. The printer can be in any mode to use these commands, and executes these commands immediately even if other IPL commands are waiting to be executed.

Printing Labels with IPL Commands Follow this basic procedure to print bar code labels using IPL: 1 Use IPL commands to design the format for the bar code label. If you do not specify a format, the printer assumes you want to use the default format (format 0), which is stored permanently in the printer. The printer prints the label using that format. 2 Send the format to the printer as a series of IPL command strings. The printer stores the format in memory. You can store multiple formats on your printer. For more information, see the “Format, Create or Edit” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual. 3 Send a command string to the printer that specifies the data for the fields of the format, and then prints the label. Note: It is not always necessary to send the format and the data to the printer separately. You can send fixed data formats or even variable data formats that include the data in the same file.

Learning the Structure of IPL Command Strings An IPL command string is a text string that you send to the printer. A command string is a combination of ASCII control codes (or their readable equivalents), the syntax for the specific command, and associated data. For example, a simple command string can look like: E2;F2;T4 where: IPL Command Structure Syntax

Definition



is the readable equivalent of the start of text character. Command strings must always begin with the start of text ASCII command code or its equivalent in readable characters. Readable characters must be enclosed in angle brackets.

E2

For more information on using ASCII command codes or their readable equivalents, see the next section, “Using ASCII Control Characters.” is the syntax and data for the IPL command “Format, Erase.”

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

3

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

IPL Command Structure (continued) Syntax

Definition

;

is the command terminator character. Use ; to separate commands and associated data. is the syntax and data for the IPL command “Format, Create.” is the syntax and data for the IPL command “Bitmap User-Defined Font, Clear or Define.” Because this is the last command in the string, you do not need to follow it with ;. is the readable equivalent of the end of text character. Command strings must always end with the end of text ASCII character or its equivalent in readable characters. Readable characters must be enclosed in angle brackets.

F2 T4



All command syntax is case sensitive. Note: When the printer is in XON/XOFF mode, you can send data and print multiple labels without using the character.

Using ASCII Control Characters Command strings always include ASCII control characters. To use ASCII control characters, you can: •

enter a control code. Some word processing programs allow you to represent ASCII control characters by entering the appropriate control code.



type the readable characters. Instead of control codes, you type the appropriate string of characters enclosed in angle brackets.

For example, an IPL command string must begin with the start of text control character. The control code for this character is 0x02 (hex notation, also represented by ^B in some text editing programs), and the readable characters for this control code are . This example shows a command string written with readable characters and with control codes: Command String Type

Command String

Readable characters: Control codes:

g1,567 ˆBˆOg1,567ˆC

For a list of ASCII control characters, control codes, and definitions, see the “Full ASCII Control Characters Table” on page 78. If the start of text character is the actual control code, then all other control characters in the same command string must be in control code format. The printer ignores any control characters represented by readable characters.

4

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

Conversely, if the start of text character is represented by readable characters (), then all other control characters in the same string must be represented by readable characters. The printer ignores any control characters represented by control codes. For simplicity, this manual uses readable characters in all examples and syntax. Note: Using readable characters consumes more memory space and takes more time to process, but each command string is more easily read and edited.

Creating Command Strings IPL command strings can be as long as needed to perform a task. For example, this series of short command strings creates and defines a label format: P E3;F3; H0;o81,100;f0;c0;d0,16;h1;w1; H1;o81,120;f0;c0;d0,16;h1;w1; H2;o81,150;f0;c2;d0,14;h1;w1; H3;o81,190;f0;c2;d0,16;h1;w1; B4;o81,0;f0;c0,1;h50;w1;d0,11;i0;[email protected]; R

This longer command string combines all eight of the previous command strings into a single string: P;E3;F3;H0;o81,100;f0;c0;d0,16;h1;w1;H1;o81,120;f0;c0; d0,16;h1;w1;H2;o81,150;f0;c2;d0,14;h1;w1;H3;o81,190;f0;c2;d0,16; h1;w1;B4;o81,0;f0;c0,1;h50;w1;d0,11;i0;[email protected]; R

The printer interprets each example exactly the same way. For more information on creating and testing command strings, see Chapter 2, “Designing Bar Code Labels.” After you determine the IPL command strings you need to accomplish a task, save the strings as an ASCII text file for future use. To create a text file of IPL command strings 1 Determine the IPL command strings you need to accomplish a task. 2 Open a text editor or word processor and type the command strings. 3 Save the file as an ASCII text file.

Sending IPL Commands to the Printer You can send IPL commands to the printer by using a communications program such as Windows HyperTerminal. Follow the next procedure to connect the printer to a PC and send a text file of IPL command strings to the printer. To send a text file of IPL commands to the printer 1 Connect the printer to the serial port (COM1) on your desktop PC. For more information, see the user’s manual for your printer.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

5

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

2 On the desktop PC, start the HyperTerminal application. 3 Configure HyperTerminal for a serial connection using these parameters: HyperTerminal Parameters Parameters

Values

Baud rate Data bits Parity Stop bits Flow control

9600 8 None 1 XON/XOFF

These serial connection characteristics are the default for IPL printers. If you have changed the communication settings on your printer, change the HyperTerminal connection settings accordingly. Note: If you receive the “write fault error” error message, it indicates that either you are sending the data to the wrong COM port or your cable does not support hardware flow control. 1 From the Main menu bar, select Transfer. 2 From the Transfer list box, select Send Text File. 3 In the Send Text File dialog box, locate your .txt file and click Open. HyperTerminal sends the .txt file to your printer. Your command text file will either change a configuration setting in the printer or print your label format.

Switching Between Printer Operating Modes When you send IPL commands to the printer, make sure you have placed the printer in the correct operating mode to interpret those commands: •

If you are sending print or configuration commands, the printer must be in Print operating mode to interpret the commands.



If you are sending program commands, the printer must be in Program mode.



If you are sending test and service commands, the printer must be in Test and Service mode.

Print mode and Program mode are two different operating modes of the printer. Before you download information to the printer, make sure that you are in the correct mode: •

Use Program mode to define formats, pages, fonts, and characters.



Use Print mode to print labels, to download data to the printer, to download configuration commands to the printer, or to upload information from an RFID tag.

To place a printer in Program mode •

Send this command string: P

6

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

Send this command every time that you download formats, even if you think the printer is already in Program mode. If the printer is already in Program mode, it ignores this command. To place a printer in Print mode •

Send this command string: R

Send this command before each set of data or as your last format command. If the printer is already in Print mode, it ignores this command. Note: The R command may be treated as data if the data to the printer does not include a or field pointer to clear the fields. To place a printer in Test and Service mode •

Send this command string: T

Send this command before any test and service commands. Typically, you will not need to use test and service commands when defining label formats.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

7

Chapter 1 — Introduction to IPL Commands

8

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

2 Designing Bar Code Labels

This chapter explains how to design and print your own labels using IPL commands. It covers the basic elements of label design and includes these topics: •

Introduction to Label Formats



About Field Types



Working With Fields



Specifying Data for Fields



Working With RFID Tags



Creating a Sample Label Format



Complex Label Design Examples

9

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Introduction to Label Formats To print a label on an Intermec printer, you must create a label format, send the format to the printer, send data to fill in the fields in the format, and then print the label. A format is a template that defines how the information prints on a label. You define a format by sending IPL command strings to the printer. The printer stores the format in its RAM or flash module. Formats can be edited with IPL commands if you place the printer in Program mode. Note: If you intend to regularly reload a format, you can use the temporary format parameter (*) with some printers. The use of format * results is an optimal use of flash-based storage memory because the printer stores it in RAM and deletes it when the printer power is turned off.

About Field Types A bar code label format is composed of several different fields that hold different types of data. The fields may differ in size, location, and orientation, as well as data type. You define information to be printed on the label as a field in the format. After the fields are defined, you can pass data to the fields and print the label. The IPL field types are: •

Human-readable fields



Bar code fields



Line and Box fields



User-defined character (UDC) or graphics fields

This section describes each field type.

SHIPPING LABEL Box field BASIS WT. 39-4838

38448379237 Humanreadable fields

ROLL WIDTH

338438

ROLLS

12

CUSTOMER ORDER NUMBER

372181192 Line field INTERMEC

Bar code field with interpretive field enabled

User-defined graphic field

Sample Label: This illustration shows a typical bar code label and how the different field types are used.

10

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Human-Readable Fields Human-readable fields contain information or data that is printed in one of the printer’s internal fonts, or in a user-defined font. Available fonts depend on your printer. Internal fonts on your printer include: •

Standard bitmap fonts measured in dots



Bitmap fonts recognized by optical character recognition (OCR) applications



Bitmap fonts measured in point sizes



Bitmap monospaced fonts



Outline fonts

Font character size can be changed by using the width and height magnification commands, or with the pitch and point-size commands. The fonts themselves remain unchanged. See Appendix B, “Character Sets,” for the complete character set for each font. Intermec printers support nine different international character sets for each command set mode. The printer may also contain character sets for IBM translation and code pages. Note: In Emulation mode, international character substitution is compatible with Intermec 8336/8646 printers. In Advanced mode, the substitution complies with ISO standards.

Bar Code Fields Bar code fields include data and information to be printed in a specific symbology. Intermec printers support these symbologies: Intermec Supported Printer Symbologies Printer Symbologies

Aztec Codabar Code 2 of 5 Code 11 Code 16K Code 39 Code 49 Code 93

Code 128 Data Matrix EAN.UCC Composite HIBC Code 128 Interleaved 2 of 5 ISBT 128 JIS-ITF Maxicode

MicroPDF417 PDF417 Planet Postnet QR Code RSS UPC/EAN Codes USPS4CB

Bar code fields can be accompanied by an interpretive field, which shows the bar code data in readable characters. You can use IPL commands to define the height and width magnification of bar code fields, set the data source for each field, change the physical orientation of fields, and to enable or disable the interpretive field.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

11

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Line and Box Fields You can use lines or boxes in a label format to separate fields and create borders on the label. Use IPL commands to define the location and size of line and box fields in a label format.

User-Defined Character or Graphic Fields These fields contain graphics or bitmap characters. You can either download the graphic to the printer before printing labels, or you can create the graphic in a command string. To download graphics or characters to the printer, you need to use: •

the Intermec PrintSet application. PrintSet converts the graphic into the appropriate format for your printer.



a third-party label-generation application. These applications convert your graphics file to a format that your printer can interpret, and send the file to the printer.

To create the graphic in a command string, you use the IPL command “Graphic or UDC, Define.” For help, see Chapter 3, “Working with Fonts and Graphics.” The maximum size of a user-defined graphic is limited by the capacity of your printer and can be increased if you install expansion RAM. You can use Direct Graphics mode to reduce the time it takes to download and print an image. For more information, see “Using Direct Graphics Mode” on page 64.

Working With Fields In addition to understanding the different types of printable fields on the printer, you need to know how to arrange them to define or change the format of a label. This section describes how you use IPL commands to position, size, rotate, and edit label fields.

Editing Field Zero (H0) By default, the printer automatically creates a human-readable field numbered zero (H0) each time you create a format by using the “Format, Create” command. H0 is created with default parameters as defined in the next table. Defaults for the H0 Field

12

Command

Definition

o0,0;

Field origin is 0,0.

f0;

Field direction is horizontal with respect to the label motion from printer.

h2;

Field height magnification is 2.

w2;

Field width magnification is 2.

c0;

Selects the 7x9 standard font.

b0;

Selects no border around human-readable field.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Defaults for the H0 Field (continued) Command

Definition

r0;

Selects horizontal orientation of characters.

d0,30;

You enter variable data in Print mode. The maximum number of characters you can enter into this field is 30.

This automatically created field is always a human-readable field and is always assigned field number 0. Because a format must always have at least one defined field, you cannot delete field 0 if it is the only field in the format. To change field 0 to a different type of field (for example, a bar code field), you have to create a temporary field of any type, delete field 0, create field 0 with a different type, and then delete the temporary field. The next example shows how this is done: P;E1;F1;L39;D0;B0;D39;

The next table describes each command in the string. Command String Values Command

Definition

P;

Enters Program mode.

E1;

Erases format 1.

F1;

Creates format 1.

L39;

Creates line field (temporary field).

D0;

Deletes field 0.

B0;

Creates bar code field 0.

D39;

Deletes the temporary line field.

Numbering Fields in a Format Be sure you assign a different field number to each field in a format. A format can have up to 400 fields, numbered 0 to 399. Keep in mind that you enter data into fields according to their numeric value if you use a to separate the data. In other words, the first string of data you enter goes into the lowest numbered field, the second string of data you enter goes into the next lowest numbered field, and so on.

About Interpretive Fields and Field Locations Each bar code field can have an interpretive field associated with it. For example, bar code field B33 would have an interpretive field I33.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

13

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Each interpretive field uses a field location from the available 400 fields. To avoid interference with other user-defined fields, interpretive fields are automatically assigned numbers beginning with the highest available field number. For example, if B33 is the first bar code field with interpretive text, then its interpretive field, I33, is assigned location 399. You can see how the printer uses the fields internally by uploading the format and examining where the interpretives appear. If you need to use more fields than IPL can accommodate in a single format (because of interpretive fields), you can use pages to combine several formats on one label.

Editing Existing Fields You can change a specific field in a format by sending a command in Program mode. You can modify just the incorrect format fields instead of having to download the entire format again. When the printer is in Program mode, it uses a field pointer to point to the field to be modified. The pointer continues to point to the most recently selected field until you select a different format or field. For the next example, assume that you used the following format: Sample Format Command

Description

C

Selects Advanced mode.

P

Enters Program mode.

E3;F3;

Erases format 3, Creates format 3.

H0;o80,100;f0;c0;d0,16;h1;w1;

Creates field H0.

H1;o80,120;f0;c0;d0,16;h1;w1;

Creates field H1.

H2;o80,150;f0;c2;d0,14;h1;w1;

Creates field H2.

H3;o80,190;f0;c2;d0,16;h1;w1;

Creates field H3.

B4;o80,0;f0;c0,1;h50;w1;d0,11;i0;[email protected];

Creates field B3.

R;

Saves and exits to Print mode.

To change the height and width of field 3 to 2 dots, download this command string: P;F3;H3;h2;w2;R;

The following table describes each command in this string: Field Editing Commands in the Sample Format

14

Command

Description

P;

Enters Program mode.

F3;

Accesses format number 3 from memory.

H3;

Accesses field 3.

h2;

Sets the height to 2 dots.

w2;

Sets the width to 2 dots.

R;

Returns to Print mode.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Deleting Fields It is possible to delete any field from a format unless the format only has one field. For example, use the following command string to delete field 3 from format 4: P;F4;D3;R

The following table describes each command in this string: Command String Descriptions Command

Description

P

Enters Program mode.

F4

Accesses format 4.

D3

Deletes field 3.

R

Returns to Print mode.

Positioning Fields Using the IPL command language to position fields is the trickiest part of designing labels. Since you cannot tell exactly how the field looks until it prints, you may need to make several test prints before you get the field positioned correctly. For all types of fields, determine the print position by defining the coordinates of the upper left corner of the unrotated field. The field origin is the upper left corner of an unrotated field. To define the coordinates of the field origin, use the “Field Origin, Define” command (ox,y), where: Field Origin, Define Command Coordinates Definition

o x y

is the command syntax. is the distance (in dots) from the left edge of the label to the field origin. is the distance (in dots) from the top edge of the label to the field origin.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

15

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

The actual measurements for x and y depend on the size of the printhead in your printer. The next table lists printhead sizes and the corresponding number of dots per mm. Dots/mm by Printhead Size Printhead Size

Dots/mm

203 dpi

8

300 dpi

11.8

406 dpi

16

Note: On the 4400, 7421, and PC41 printers, be sure to use the “Label Width, Set” command to set the printer for the correct label width, or the y setting will be incorrect. For example, to position a field to print approximately 0.25 inch from the left side and 0.5 inch from the top of your label, the “Field Origin, Define” command value is o51,102.

D A H u m a n - re a d a b l e fi e l d

H u m a n - re a d a b l e fi e l d

B

*BCFIELD*

*Bar code interpretive field*

C A = o51, 102 B = o51, 203

C = o51, 305 D = o355, 102

Field Positioning: This illustration shows the relative positions of four fields with different origin points.

Note: If you are operating your printer in Emulation mode, the dot sizes are doubled (101 dots per inch or 4 dots per mm), so the origin for 1 inch from the top of the label and 0.5 inch from the left side is o25,51.

Rotating Fields You can rotate any type of printable field in increments of 90 degrees counterclockwise around the field origin. To position a rotated field, remember that the field origin remains on the corner where it was before you rotated the field. If you rotate a field 90 degrees counterclockwise, the origin that was at the upper left corner is now at the lower left corner. Use the “Field Direction” command (syntax fn) to define the field rotation. See the IPL Command Reference Manual for more information.

16

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels



To rotate a field 90 degrees, you must position the lower left corner of the rotated field.



To rotate a field 180 degrees, you must position the lower right corner of the rotated field.



To rotate a field 270 degrees, you must position the upper right corner of the rotated field.

f2 (rotated 180 degrees)

ABCDE

f1(rotated 90 degrees)

ABCDE

ABCDE

Field origin

ABCDE f0 (horizontal)

f3 (rotated 270 degrees) Field Rotation: This illustration shows the effects of rotating a field by using the Field Direction command.

Scaling Fields The size of a field is determined by the font or graphic you use and the field magnification factors you apply. You can use the height and width magnification commands to scale each of these fields even further.

Magnifying Fonts and Character Fields Internal printer fonts already have specific sizes. For example, the letters in font c0 are 7 dots wide by 9 dots high, with a 1-dot gap between characters. If you design a field that prints 10 letters in font c0, the field will be 79 dots wide by 9 dots high. By applying magnification factors (h for height and w for width), you can increase a field’s height or width. If you increase the height to 2 (h2) for the field described above, the field height doubles, and the final field prints 79 dots long by 18 dots high. If you change the height magnification to h3, the field height triples, and the field prints 79 dots by 27 dots. The default human-readable field H0 prints the 7 x 9 font as follows (assuming you enter the word “example” as data): When you apply a magnification factor of 3 to human-readable field H0, the font now prints the image below:

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

17

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Increasing the width of a text field to 2 makes each letter in the field twice as wide. If you did this to the example above, with field height h2, the final field would print 158 dots wide by 18 dots high. When you magnify a bitmap font, the edges of the characters become jagged. If you want to print large text characters, use an outline font.

Magnifying Bar Code Fields You can also use height and width commands to modify bar code fields, but the commands are defined differently for use with bar codes. For bar code fields, the height magnification is the actual dot height of the bar code. If you set a height magnification of 20, the height of the bar code field will be 20 dots. Printing narrow bar codes conserves space on each label as well as media; however, if you plan to scan bar codes from a distance, you may need to magnify the bar code widths. The width magnification factor for bar code fields refers to the width of the narrowest element of the bar code. When you specify a narrow element width of 3, the width of the narrowest element in the symbology is 3 dots wide. The spaces and large element widths are magnified according to preset ratios for each symbology. Note: You can only print a bar width of 1 if you are printing in drag mode (bars perpendicular to the print head). If you select a width of 1 in picket mode (bars parallel to the print head), the printer defaults to 2. The default height for bar code fields is 50 dots, and the default width for narrow elements is 1 dot. Note: If you are using the POSTNET symbology, follow the rules for magnifying fonts.

Specifying Data for Fields After you design a format for a bar code label, you need to provide the data to be printed in human-readable or bar code fields. For human-readable fields, you can specify data in two ways: •

You can add the data to the command string that defines that field. This is a good choice for text that is constant from label to label.



You can add command strings after the label format that include the data to be printed. This is a good choice for text that may change from label to label, such as incremental numbering. You need to place the printer into Print mode before adding these command strings.

For bar code data, you place the printer into Print mode, and then add command strings that include the data to be printed.

18

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Example of Constant Data This example defines a simple bar code label format that prints a part number in a bar code field with an interpretive field. The data (part number) remains constant for all labels printed using this format. Label Format Example - Constant Data Command String

Definition

P

Places the printer in Program mode.

E2;F2

Erases current format 2 and creates new format 2.

H0;o200,50;d3,PART NUMBER FORMAT Changes the default settings for field 0: places the origin at 200,50,

and specifies the text “PART NUMBER FORMAT” for the field data. B1;o200,200;i1;d0,13

Defines a new bar code field at origin 200,200, enables an interpretive field, specifies that data for this field will be transmitted when the printer is in Print mode, and sets a data length of 13 characters. All other field settings are default values.

R

Places the printer in Print mode.

E2

Selects format 2 and clears all previous data.

F1*999-999-999*

Selects field 1 (the new bar code field) and specifies the data to be printed in that field (*999-999-999*).



Prints the bar code label.

This label format looks like this: PART NUMBER FORMAT

*999-999-999*



Constant Data Example

Example of Changing Data The next example shows how to define a simple bar code label format that prints a part number in a bar code field and an incremented order number in a humanreadable field. The order number changes for every label printed in this format. You use the “Numeric Field Separator” command (syntax ) to specify the numeric data to be incremented, and the “Field Increment, Set” command (syntax I) to specify the increment value.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

19

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Label Format Example - Changing Data Command String

Definition

P;E2;F2

Places the printer in Program mode, erases current format 2, and creates a new format 2.

H0;o200,50;d3,ORDER NUMBER FORMAT

Changes the default settings for field 0, placing the origin at 200,50, and specifying the text “ORDER NUMBER FORMAT” for the field data.

B1;o200,100;i1;d0,13

Defines a bar code field at origin 200,200, enables an interpretive field, specifies that data for this field will be transmitted when the printer is in Print mode, and sets a data length of 13 characters. All other field settings are defaults.

H2;o200,350;d3,ORDER NUMBER

Defines a human-readable field at origin 200,350, and specifies the text “ORDER NUMBER” for the field data. All other field settings are defaults.

H3;o200,400;d0,30

Defines a human-readable field at origin 200,400, and specifies that data for this field will be transmitted when the printer is in Print mode. All other field settings are defaults.

RE2

Places the printer in Print mode, selects format 2, and clears all previous data.

F1*999-999-999*

Selects field 1 (the bar code field) and specifies the data to be printed in that field (*999-999-999*).

F31000I5

Selects field 3 and specifies the value“1000” for the field data. is the syntax for the “Numeric Field Separator” command, and indicates that the value is to be incremented for each label. I is the syntax for the “Increment Value, Set” command, and sets an incrementation value of 5.

3

is the syntax for the “Quantity Count, Set” command, and specifies that 3 labels are to be printed. prints the labels. The order numbers on these labels should be 1000, 1005, and 1010.

Example Using the “Next Data Entry Field, Select” Command This example shows how to define a label with four human-readable fields. If you do not specify the field to which data is assigned, the printer automatically assigns that data to the lowest numbered field. In this example, the field is not specified, so the printer assigns the first data string to field 1, the next data string to field 2, and so on. The data strings are separated by the “Next Data Entry Field, Select” command (syntax ). Label Format Example Using Command Command String

Definition

P;E6;F6

Places the printer in Program mode, erases current format 6, and creates a new format 6.

H0;o100,100;d0,20

Changes the default settings for field 0: places the origin at 200,50, and specifies that data for this field will be transmitted when the printer is in Print mode. All other field settings are defaults.

20

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Label Format Example Using Command (continued) Command String

Definition

H1;o200,200;d0,20

Defines a human-readable field at origin 200,200. All other settings are identical to H0.

H2;o300,300;d0,20

Defines a human-readable field at origin 300,300. All other settings are identical to H0.

H3;o400,400;d0,20

Defines a human-readable field at origin 400,400. All other settings are identical to H0.

RE6

Places the printer in Print mode, selects format 6, and clears all previous data.

FIRST FIELD SECOND FIELD THIRD FIELD FOURTH FIELD

Specifies the data to be assigned to the four fields requiring input. separates the individual data strings. The first data string (FIRST FIELD) is assigned to field 0, the second (SECOND FIELD) to field 1, and so on.



Prints the label.

The label looks like this when printed:

FIRST FIELD SECOND FIELD THIRD FIELD FOURTH FIELD

Working With RFID Tags If a printer has an RFID module installed, the RFID mode is automatically turned on. You need to configure the printer, declare a format that includes commands to read and write to the tag, and print the format to a label. The printer aligns the tag with the antenna, executes the RFID commands, repositions the label, prints the image buffer to the label, and then positions the next label for printing.

How to Write Data to an RFID Tag To write data to an RFID tag you need to do two things: specify an area in the tag’s memory and define the data that will be written to the tag. To specify an area in the tag’s memory, you define an RFID tag write field. This field specifies which segment is written to, the start position, length of data (in bytes) and the format of the data.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

21

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

How Data is Stored on an RFID Tag Data written to the RFID tag is stored from the left starting with the byte that is defined as the start of field byte and then going the length of the defined field (in bytes).

Writing Hex or ASCII Formats If the tag format is hex or ASCII and the field source data string is shorter than the allocated number of bytes, the data string’s least significant bytes (from the right) are padded with zeroes until they fill the length of the field. If the field source data string is longer than the allocated number of bytes, the error is sent and nothing is written to the tag. If auto-transmit level 3 is enabled, an status response is returned to the host.

Writing Numerical Formats If the tag format is numerical (NUM), the data is stored as a numerical value. In this tag format, if the field source data string is shorter than the allocated number of bytes, the data string’s most significant bytes (from the left) are padded with zeroes until they fill the length of the field. Note: The number of bytes needed to represent a numerical value is never greater than the number of bytes needed to represent the number as a data string.

Creating a Sample Label Format In this example, you will design a simple label that includes a human-readable field, a line field, and a bar code field. On a blank label, sketch a format that looks roughly like the sample. Use a humanreadable field and a barcode field, and separate them with a line field.

THIS IS THE SAMPLE LABEL

*SAMPLE*

*SAMPLE*

Sample Label: This sample uses a human-readable field, a line field, and a bar code field with interpretive field enabled.

22

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Positioning Fields in a Label Format Each field in a label format is positioned relative to the label origin, which is the top left corner of the label. To set the origin of a field on a label, you assign x and y coordinates to the upper left corner of the field, where x is the distance (in dots) from the left edge of the label, and y is the distance (in dots) from the top edge of the label. Label origin y x Human-readable field Line field Bar code field

Label moves this direction through printer Positioning Fields: This illustration shows the relationship of fields on a label to the label origin.

To determine the field origin 1 Measure the distance (in mm) from the upper left corner of the human-readable field to the left edge of the label. 2 To determine the value for x, multiply the distance times the number of dots per mm for your printhead. See the next table for more information. Dots/mm by Printhead Size Printhead Size

Dots/mm

203 dpi

8

300 dpi

11.8

406 dpi

16

For example, if you are designing the label for a printer with a 203 dpi printhead and the distance is 25 mm: 25 mm x 8 dots/mm = 200. The value for x is 200. 3 Measure the distance (in mm) from the top left corner of the human-readable field to the top edge of the label. 4 To determine the value for y, multiply the distance times the number of dots for your printhead. For example, if the distance is 12.5 mm:

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

23

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

12.5 mm x 8 dots/mm = 100. The value for y is 100. The origin position for the human-readable field is 200, 100. 5 Repeat steps 1 to 4 to find the origin points for the line field and for the bar code field. Note: On the 4400, 7421, and PC41 printers, be sure to use the label width command to set the actual width of your labels; otherwise, the y origins will be incorrect.

Creating Command Strings for the Label Format Next, write the IPL command strings to create the label format. You use IPL commands to create and define each field in the format. For example, to create a human-readable field, you use the “Human-Readable Field, Create or Edit” command. Each type of field is defined by several parameters. For example, a human-readable field includes settings for field origin point, font, direction, height and width, data source, and number of characters. For more information, see the command in the IPL Command Reference Manual. To create the command strings 1 Open a text editor or word processor application. 2 Type these three command strings to choose Advanced mode, place the printer in Program mode, and create and define the label format: C P E4;F4 The next table explains these values: Values for Sample Label Command Strings

24

Text

Description



ASCII start of text control code in readable characters. Each command string must begin with the start of text control code or its equivalent in readable characters.

C

C is the syntax for the “Advanced Mode, Select” command.



ASCII end of text control code in readable characters. Each command string must end with the end of text control code or its equivalent in readable characters.

P

P is the syntax for the “Program Mode, Enter” command. You need to place the printer in Program Mode to create and define a label format.

E4

E is the syntax for the “Format, Erase” command. This command clears format 4 from the printer memory.

F4

F is the syntax for the “Format, Create” command, which creates a new, blank format 4 in the printer memory.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

3 Type the following text to create and define the human-readable field: H0,o200,100;c25;f0;h20;w20;d0,30 The next table explains these values. Values for Human-Readable Field Command String Text

Description

H0

H is the syntax for “Human-Readable Field, Create or Edit” command, with field number 0.

o200,100

o sets the origin point for this field, where x = 200 and y = 100. For more information, see “Positioning Fields in a Label Format” on page 23.

;

; is the command terminator character, which is used to separate each command and its associated data with the next command.

c25

c selects the font to be used in this field. 25 = outline font.

f0

f sets the field direction. 0 = horizontal.

h20

h sets the height magnification (in this case, 20).

w20

w sets the width magnification value (in this case, 20).

d0,30

d sets the data source and length for this field. 0 chooses data field 0, with a maximum length of 30 characters.

4 Press Enter and type the following text to create and define the line field: L1;o200,200;f0;l575;w5; The next table explains these values: Values for Line Field Command String Text

Description

L1

L is the syntax for the “Line Field, Create or Edit” command, with field number 1.

o200,200

o sets the origin of the line field, where x = 200 and y = 200.

;

; is the command terminator character.

f0

f sets the direction of the line field (horizontal).

l575

l sets the length of the line in dots (575).

w5

w sets the width of the line in dots (5).

Note: The difference between the lowercase letter “l” and the numeral “1” is not very noticeable in the Courier font. Make sure that you enter the correct command. 5 Press Enter and type the following text to create and define the bar code field: B2;o203,153;c0,0;h100;w2;i1;d0,10; The next table explains the bar code field command string values:

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

25

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Values for Bar Code Field Command String Text

Description

B2

B is the syntax for the “Bar Code Field, Create or Edit” command, with field number 2.

o200,150

o sets the origin of the bar code field, where x = 200 and y = 150.

;

; is the command terminator character.

c0,0

c is the syntax for the “Bar Code, Select Type” command, where 0,0 specifies Code 39, 8646 compatible, with no check digit.

h100

h is the syntax for the “Height Magnification of Bar Code, Define” command, where 100 indicates a magnification of 100 dots tall.

w2

w is the syntax for “Width of Bar Code, Define” command, where 2 indicates a magnification of 2 dots wide

i1

i is the syntax for the “Interpretive Field” command, where 1 enables the field.

d0,10

d is the syntax for the “Field Data, Define Source” command, where 0,10 indicates that the data is entered in Print mode and has a maximum length of 10 characters.

6 Press Enter and type the following text to define the interpretive field: I2;h1;w1;c20 The next table explains these values: Values for Interpretive Field Command String Text

Description

I2

I is the syntax for the “Interpretive Field, Define” command, with field number 2 (matches the accompanying bar code field number).

h1

h is the syntax for the “Height Magnification” command, with a magnification level of 1 dot vertically.

w1

w is the syntax for the “Width Magnification” command, with a magnification level of 1 dot horizontally.

c20

c is the syntax for the “Font Type, Select” command, where 20 specifies the 8-point monospace font.

7 Press Enter and type the following text to place the printer in Print mode, access format 4, and clear previous field data: R E4

26

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Values for Print Mode Command String Text

Description

R

Places the printer in Print mode.

E4

E is the syntax for the “Format, Select” command. This command selects format 4.



is the syntax for the “Clear All Data” command.

8 Press Enter and type the following text to create the data lines for the humanreadable and bar code fields: THIS IS THE SAMPLE LABEL SAMPLE The next table explains these values: Values for Data Line Command Strings Text

Description

THIS IS THE SAMPLE LABEL

Data line for the human-readable field. The fields in the label format are populated in order by field number.



is the syntax for the “Next Data Entry Field, Select” command.

SAMPLE

Data line for the bar code interpretive field.

9 Press Enter and type the following text: where is the syntax for the “Print” command. Note: The difference between the lowercase letter “l” and the numeral “1” is not very noticeable in the Courier font. Make sure that you enter the correct command. 10 Save the text file as “SampleLabel.txt”. The label format command strings are complete and look like this: C P E4;F4 H0;o200,100;f0;c25;h20;w20;d0,30 L1;o200,150;f0;l575;w5 B2;o200,200;c0,0;h100;w2;i1;d0,10 I2;h1;w1;c20 R E4

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

27

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

THIS IS THE SAMPLE LABEL SAMPLE

Printing the Sample Label To print the sample label, you can open a communications program (such as HyperTerminal) and send the text file to the printer. For more information on connecting to the printer, see your printer user’s manual. The label looks like this when printed:

THIS IS THE SAMPLE LABEL

*SAMPLE*

*SAMPLE*

Sample Label

Complex Label Design Examples This section includes several examples of complex bar code label designs. Use these examples as a source of ideas for your own label formats.

Example with Lines and Boxes The following example uses horizontal lines to separate fields on a label and uses a box field to make a label border. This format uses bold text to highlight the lines that contain line or box fields.

Command Strings C0 P E4;F4,DEMO 4 L1;o11,447;f0;l1207;w4 L2;o11,285;f0;l1207;w4 W3;o11,0;f0;l1207;h802;w4 B4;o658,650;f0;h102;w2;c0,0;i1;r1;d0,11 I4;o658,752;f0;h1;w1;c20;r0;b0 B5;o87,650;f0;h102;w2;c0,0;i1;r1;d0,11 I5;o87,752;f0;h1;w1;c20;r0;b0

28

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

H6;o34,183;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,17 H7;o35,143;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,BASIS WT. 39-4838 H8;o389,305;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,ROLLS H9;o40,305;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,ROLL WIDTH L10;o11,609;f0;l1207;w4 H12;o1022,508;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,7 H13;o1022,467;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,WEIGHT H14;o539,508;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,11 H15;o539,467;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,LOCATION H16;o42,508;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,15 H17;o43,467;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,CUSTOMER ORDER NUMBER H18;o840,346;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,13 H19;o840,305;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,ORDER ITEM NUMBER H20;o389,346;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,7 H21;o34,346;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,11 H22;o747,183;f0;h1;w1;c22;r0;b0;d0,15 H23;o743,143;f0;h1;w1;c21;r0;b0;d3,GRADE DESCRIPTION H24;o325,0;f0;h51;w34;c25;r0;b3;d3,SHIPPING LABEL R E4 F4INTERMEC F5372181192 F638448379237 F12230 F143839494 F16372181192 F18234-LOFT F2012 F21338438 F22A-PLUS QTY

These command strings print this label:

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

29

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

SHIPPING LABEL BASIS WT. 39-4838

GRADE DESCRIPTION

38448379237 ROLL WIDTH

338438

A - PLUS QTY

ROLLS

ORDER ITEM NUMBER

12

234 - LOFT

CUSTOMER ORDER NUMBER

LOCATION

WEIGHT

372181192

3839494

230

INTERMEC

3 7 2 1 8 11 9 2

Example Format with Lines and Boxes

Example with Graphics and Rotated Fields This example is a complex label that includes human-readable fields, a bar code field, line fields, a box field, and a graphic field.

Command Strings C P E5;F5 H0;o35,40;c25;d3,Cat.;k12 H1;o35,70;c25;d3,No.;k12 H2;o165,0;c25;d3,432-3221;k36 H3;o785,40;c25;d3,Std.;k12 H4;o785,70;c25;d3,Qty.;k12 H5;o915,0;c25;d3,100;k36 L6;o740,10;f3;l130;w8 L7;o25,140;l1130;w8 H8;o30,165;c25;f3;r1;d3,Size;k12 H9;o80,170;c25;d3,1 ”;k30 H10;o150,165;f3;r1;c25;d3,3/4;h3;w7 L11;o300,140;f3;l130;w8 L12;o25,270;l275;w8 H13;o60,560;f1;c25;d0,20;h3;w2 L14;o140,270;f3;l310;w8 H15;o360,120;c22;d3,DUPLEX ANGLE CONNECTOR;h3;w1 H16;o170,320;c25;d3,- For Flexible Steel Conduit and .375” - .625”;k12 H17;o212,375;c25;d3,Diameter Armored and Nonmetallic Sheath Cables;k12 H18;o170,450;c25;d3,- For Smooth or Interlocking Sheath Metal Clad;k12

30

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

H19;o212,505;c25;d3,Cables .375” - .675” Dia. (UL only);k12 L20;o25,580;l1130;w8 U21;o40,610;c2;h9;w9 H22;o210,600;c25;d3,ACE CORP.;k24 H23;o210,670;c25;d3,ADDRESS 3010;k12 H24;o210,710;c25;d3,FICTION USA;k12 B25;o685,615;c0,0;d0,20;i1;h100;[email protected] I25;h2;w2 L26;o590,580;f3;l185;w8 W27;o015,000;w10;l1150;h775 R E5 Lot 23455 262948307 91747I2 5

These command strings print this label:

Cat. No.

432-3221

13 4 Lot 23455 262948

S i z e

Std. Qty.

100

DUPLEX ANGLE CONNECTOR

- For Flexible Steel Conduit and .375" - .625" Diameter Armored and Nonmetallic Sheath Cables - For Smooth or Interlocking Sheath Metal Clad Cables .375" - .675" Dia. (UL only)

ACE CORP. ADDRESS 3010 FICTION USA

*30791751* *307 91747*

Example Format with Rotated Fields and Graphic

Note: This example uses the “diamond” graphic from the procedure in “Creating User-Defined Characters for Advanced Mode” on page 48. To print this label, you need to follow that procedure to create and download the graphic to your printer beforehand. The next table explains the command strings for this example. For more information, see the IPL Command Reference Manual. Command String Descriptions for Example Command

Description

C

Places the printer in Advanced mode.

P

Places the printer in Program mode.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

31

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Command String Descriptions for Example (continued) Command

Description

E5;F5

Clears current format 5 and creates a new format 5.

H0;

Defines field 0 as a human-readable field.

o35,40;

Sets the origin of field 0 at 35,40.

c25;

Sets the font for field 0 to font 25.z

d3,Cat.;

Sets the data for field 0 to “Cat.”.

k12;

Sets the font size to 12.

L6;

Defines field 6 as a line field.

o740,10;

Sets the origin for field 6 at 740,10.

f3;

Rotates field 6 by 270 degrees counterclockwise around the field origin.

l130;

Sets the length of the line in field 6 to 130 dots.

w8;

Sets the width of field 6 to 8 dots.

H8;

Defines field 8 as a human-readable field.

o30,165;

Sets the origin of field 8 at 30,165.

c25;

Defines the font for field 8 as font 25.

f3;

Rotates field 8 by 270 degrees counterclockwise around the origin.

r1;

Rotates the characters in field 8 by 90 degrees counterclockwise.

d3,Size;

Sets the data for field 8 to “Size”.

k12;

Sets the Font size to 12.

H10;

Defines field 10 as a human-readable field.

o150,165;

Sets the origin for field 10 at 150,165.

f3;

Rotates field 10 by 270 degrees counterclockwise around the origin.

r1;

Rotates the characters in field 10 by 90 degrees counterclockwise.

c25;

Sets the font for field 10 to font 25.

d3,3/4;

Sets the data for field 10 to “3/4”.

k12;

Sets the font size to 12.

H13;

Defines field 13 as a human-readable field.

o60,560;

Sets the origin of field 13 at 60,560.

f1;

Rotates field 13 by 90 degrees around the origin.

c25;

Sets the font for field 13 to font 25.

d0,20;

Specifies that data for field 13 is entered during Print mode with a maximum of 20 characters.

k10;

Sets the font size to 10.

U21;

Defines field 21 as a graphic field.

o40,610;

Sets the origin of field 21 at 40,610.

c2;

Specifies that field 21 prints in font 2. In this case, font 2 actually refers to the user-defined graphic (“diamond”) previously downloaded to the printer.

h9;

Sets the height to nine times the original size.

w9;

Sets the width to 9 dots.

B25;

Defines field 25 as a bar code field.

o685,615;

Sets the origin of field 25 at 685,615.

c0,0;

Sets the bar code font to Code 39 with no check digit.

32

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Command String Descriptions for Example (continued) Command

Description

d0,20;

Determines that the data for field 25 is entered during Print mode with a maximum of 20 characters.

i1;

Enables the interpretive field for the bar code, to print with start and stop characters included.

h100;

Sets the bar code height to 100 dots.

[email protected];

Clears all prefixes from the bar code field.

I25

Edits the interpretive field for bar code field 25.

h2

Sets the height of the interpretive field to twice its original height.

w2

Sets the width of the interpretive field to 2 dots.

W27;

Defines field 27 as a box field.

o015,000;

Sets the origin of field 27 at 15,0.

w10;

Defines the line width of the box as 10 dots.

l1150;

Defines the length of the box as 1150.

h775;

Sets the height of the box to 775.

R

Places the printer in Print mode.

E5

Accesses format 5 from the printer memory.



Clears all data for the current format and sets the field pointer to the lowest numbered dataentry field.

Lot 23455 262948

This is the data intended for the first data-entry field. instructs the printer to go to the next data-entry field.



Specifies that the following data is to be incremented.

307 91747

This is the data intended for the next data-entry field (specified as data to be incremented).



Specifies that the preceding data is to be incremented.

I2

The data surrounded by commands is to be incremented by a value of 2 after each label is printed.

5

Sets the number of labels to print when the print command is executed.



Prints the label.

RFID Tag Example This example is a bar code label that contains an RFID tag.

Command Strings C P E4;F4; H0;o102,51;f0;c25;h20;w20;d0,30; L1;o102,102;f0;l575;w5; B2;o203,153;c0,0;h100;w2;i1;d0,10; I2;h1;w1;c20; Q3;a2,2,0,23;d3,MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE; R; E4

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

33

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE SAMPLE J2,2,0,23

*SAMPLE*

*SAMPLE*

MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE

These commands print this label:

RFID Tag Example

The next table explains the command strings for the RFID tag example. For more information, see the IPL Command Reference Manual. Label Format – RFID Example Command Descriptions Command

Description

C

Places the printer in Advanced mode.

P

Places the printer in Program mode.

E4;F4

Clears current format 4 and creates a new format 4.

H0

Defines field 0 as a human-readable field.

o102,51

Sets the origin of field 0 at coordinates 102,51.

f0

Rotates field 0 by 0 degrees.

c25

Sets the font to font 25.

h20

Sets the height to 20 times original size.

w20

Sets the width to 20 times original size.

d0,30

Specifies that data for this field is transmitted in Print mode with a maximum of 30 characters.

L1

Defines field 1 as a line field.

o102,102

Sets the origin of field 1 at coordinates 102,102.

f0

Rotates field 1 by 90 degrees counterclockwise around the origin.

l575

Defines the length of the line as 575.

w5

Sets the width of the line to 5 dots.

B2

Defines field 2 as a bar code field.

o203,153

Sets the origin of field 2 at coordinates 203,153.

c0,0

Sets the bar code font to Code 39 with no check digit.

34

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

Label Format – RFID Example Command Descriptions (continued) Command

Description

h100

Sets the height to 100 dots.

w2

Sets the width to 2 dots.

i1

Enables the interpretive field, to print with start and stop characters included.

d0,10

Specifies that data for this field is transmitted in Print mode with a maximum of 10 characters.

I2

Edits the interpretive field for bar code field 2.

h1

Sets the height to original size.

w1

Sets the width to original size.

c20

Sets the font to font 20.

Q3

Defines field 3 as an RFID field.

a2,2,0,23

Sets the format to ASCII, writes to the Data segment, starts on byte 0 and writes up to 23 bytes.

d3,MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE

Defines constant data for field 3 to be “MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE.”

R

Places the printer in Print mode.

E4

Accesses format 4 from the printer memory.



Clears all data for format 4 and sets the field pointer to the lowest numbered data-entry field.

MY FIRST RFID TAG WRITE

This is the data intended for the first data-entry field (human-readable field 0). instructs the printer to go to the next data-entry field.

SAMPLE

This is the data intended for the second data-entry field (bar code field 2).

J2,2,0 ,23

Reads the data from the RFID tag. The data is in ASCII format on the Data segment, starting on byte 0 and having a length of 23 bytes.



Prints the label.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

35

Chapter 2 — Designing Bar Code Labels

36

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

3 Working with Fonts and Graphics

This chapter explains fonts and how to choose them for your application, and describes how to create user-defined characters and fonts. Sections in this chapter include: •

Learning About Fonts



Downloading Fonts to the Printer



Using TrueType Fonts



Installing Asian Fonts



Licensing Your Fonts



Creating Bitmap Fonts From TrueType Fonts



Creating User-Defined Characters and Fonts

37

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Learning About Fonts In addition to the fonts permanently resident in your printer, you can download scalable outline fonts and user-defined bitmap fonts. This section explains the differences between bitmap and outline fonts and how to choose the best font for your application.

About Bitmap Fonts Bitmap fonts can be used on any Intermec printer. These fonts typically print quickly, require less memory than outline fonts, and print at the highest quality in a specific size. Bitmap fonts are memory intensive when defined as large characters. When you download bitmap characters to the printer, you must select the size of the characters. Make sure that you select the size you want to use in your formats. If you use IPL commands to magnify the character size in the printer, the edges of the characters will be jagged.

About Outline Fonts Outline fonts can be scaled up to 10.16 cm (4 in) and will print in magnified sizes without jagged edges. These fonts also image more slowly than bitmap fonts. Most Intermec printers include TrueDoc or Speedo outline fonts. You can also download TrueType outline fonts to some printers. The next table lists outline font compatibility by printer. Outline Font Compatibility by Printer Printer

TrueType

TrueDoc

Speedo

3240





3400A,B,C,D





3400e





3440





44X0





4X30



7421



F4





PC41



PD series





PF/PM/PX series







TrueType fonts are the most popular outline fonts, and several are available through Windows on your desktop PC. For more information on TrueType fonts, see “Using TrueType Fonts” on page 41.

38

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Although some Intermec printers do not support TrueType outline fonts, you can use the PrintSet application to convert TrueType outline fonts to bitmaps for use on any Intermec printer. For more information, see “Creating Bitmap Fonts From TrueType Fonts” on page 44.

Choosing a Font See the next table to decide which type of font best suits your needs. Font Comparison Table Font Type

Print Speed

Selection

Memory

Scalability

Bitmap

Fastest

Extensive

Varies with size of characters

Poor

Outline (TrueType)

Medium

Extensive in Typically 50-80KB; Windows Asian fonts are much larger

Good

Outline (Speedo)

Fast

Limited

Good

Typically 20-30KB

Downloading Fonts to the Printer You can download fonts to the printer and store them in the non-volatile memory. Although the printer reserves 16 font ID numbers (3 to 6, and 8 to 19) for downloaded fonts, the amount of available memory limits the number of fonts you can store. There are two ways to download fonts to the printer: •

Use the PrintSet application. PrintSet is available on the Printer Companion CD that shipped with your printer. You can use PrintSet to select fonts and directly download them to your printer. You can also download the latest release of PrintSet from the Intermec web site at www.intermec.com. For more information on downloading fonts with PrintSet, see the next section.



(Advanced users only) Use IPL commands. For help, see “Using IPL Commands to Download Fonts” on page 40.

Using PrintSet to Download Fonts The easiest way to download fonts to the printer is with the PrintSet application (v2.0 or later). Intermec printers require that bitmap fonts be either one bit per byte or six bits per byte. PrintSet automatically converts all bitmap fonts into the six bits per byte format. Because bitmap fonts can be memory intensive, you can use PrintSet to define and download only a subset of the font (for example, only the numbers), saving storage space on the printer. PrintSet automatically converts scalable outline fonts into nybblized data that you can download to the printer. PrintSet can also convert fixed outline fonts into downloadable bitmap fonts.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

39

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

For more information on using PrintSet to download fonts, see the PrintSet online documentation.

Using IPL Commands to Download Fonts Although the easiest way to download fonts is with PrintSet, you can also use the IPL command set to create and download user-defined bitmap and outline fonts to your Intermec printer.

Downloading Bitmap Fonts To learn more about bitmap font formats, see “Creating User-Defined Font Characters for Advanced Mode” on page 53.

Downloading Outline Fonts If you need to download an outline font but you cannot use PrintSet, you can: •

create a program to convert the outline font to a format you can download to the printer.



manually convert the outline font to a format you can download to the printer.

When you convert an outline font to a format you can download to the printer, you must change the font character data into nybblized data that the printer can interpret. When you nybblize data, you divide each byte of data into two bytes. For example: byte 0xAB becomes two bytes: 0x41, 0x42 or text string “AB” To manually download an outline font to your printer 1 Nybblize the font data. Divide the nybblized data into separate lines preceded by the j command (for more information, see the Outline Font, Download command in the IPL Command Reference Manual). Remember to wrap the entire line in and ;. You need short lines for limited message length protocols and to make modifying easier by using an editor or word processing program. 2 Include IPL commands to instruct the printer what to do with the font data. For help, see the following example. 3 Send the commands to the printer using one of the methods described in Chapter 1. This is an example of a nybblized outline font file that includes IPL commands to send it directly to a printer. Nybblized Outline Font File Example Command

Definition

RCP

Enter Program mode.

J03,Times,1;

Create TrueType font 3 and give it the name Times.

j0001000000110100000400604c545348efe24cd00000;

TrueType data string.

40

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Nybblized Outline Font File Example (continued) Command

Definition

j00ebf468646d78d956f5ab0001135800001508686561;

TrueType data string.

j0d2000012f04000006a3706f7374d43c8176000135a8;

TrueType data string.

: : :

Several TrueType data strings not shown due to space constraints.

j00b3008200b0008725ba0000;

Last TrueType data string.

R

Exit Program mode.

Using TrueType Fonts This section includes information to keep in mind if you are using TrueType fonts with your Intermec printer. Since TrueType fonts may be very complex, they tend to image slower than bitmap fonts. You cannot subset a TrueType font. You must download the entire font to the printer. Note: When using TrueType fonts, your printer must be configured to operate in 8 bit mode. Intermec also recommends the following printer configuration: highest supported baud rate, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, XON/XOFF flow control. Your TrueType fonts must be compatible with Microsoft Windows. To generate bitmap fonts from TrueType fonts for a particular language, you must run PrintSet under that language version of Microsoft Windows. You can run PrintSet Version 2.0 and later under Windows 95/98/NT 4.0/2000/XP.

Selecting the Printer Language When you install a TrueType font, you must select the correct printer language. To choose the correct language, use the IPL command “Printer Language, Select.” If the language setting you have chosen does not work, use the default language setting.

TrueType Fonts and Memory Usage To install a TrueType font in your printer, the printer must have enough memory available to contain the entire font file. The size of the TrueType font file, in bytes, is the minimum amount of memory you must have available in your printer. Bitmap fonts generated from TrueType files will vary in size, depending on the point size and number of characters you create. The larger the point size you choose, the larger the resulting file size. Some TrueType fonts require large amounts of dynamic RAM to operate. If you receive an error code 37 when printing a label using TrueType fonts, you may need to purchase expanded dynamic RAM.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

41

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Installing Asian Fonts For the PD/PF/PM/PX series printers, you can purchase a font card that includes scalable Chinese, Japanese, or Korean fonts. When you install the font card in your printer, the fonts can be used immediately. Note: The EasyCoder F4 does not support bitmap or TrueType Chinese, Japanese, or Korean fonts. For the 3240, 3400e, 3440, 4420, and 4440 printers, you can use PrintSet 2.1 or later to download Chinese, Japanese, or Korean scalable fonts to the printer. You may need to install more flash memory on the printer to use these fonts. The amount of memory you need depends on the size and number of fonts you want to install. For more information on downloading scalable fonts to your printer, see the PrintSet documentation. When you download one of these scalable fonts, you must install the necessary code page tables. For help, see the next section.

Installing Code Page Tables for Asian Scalable Fonts If you install a Japanese, Chinese, or Korean scalable font on a 3240, 3400e, 3440, 4420, or 4440 printer, you must also install the code page tables. You can download code pages from Intermec’s web site at www.intermec.com. Follow the next procedure to download and install code pages on your printer. Note: Before you begin, you need a serial connection between your desktop PC and your Intermec printer. For help, see your printer user’s manual. To download and install code pages 1 From the main Intermec web page, choose Support > Downloads. The Downloads page appears. 2 Choose your printer model from the drop-down list. A list of downloadable software appears. 3 Scroll down the list to Printer Fonts and click the code page you want to download. Follow the prompts to download the code page file to your PC. 4 Browse to the code page file and unzip it. After you unzip the file, the code page file is one of the following: SJIS.PCF - Japanese (Shift JIS) BIG5.PCF - Traditional Chinese (Big 5) GB.PCF - Simplified Chinese (GB 2312) KSC.PCF - Korean (KSC5601)

42

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

5 Open a HyperTerminal session to the printer. Note: Configure the HyperTerminal session for these parameters: •

Baud rate: 19200



Parity: None



Data bits: 8



Stop bits: 1



Flow control: XON/XOFF

6 From the Transfer menu, select Send File. The Send File dialog box appears. 7 In the Name field, locate your file, and then click Send. The code page is downloaded to the printer.

Installing Asian Bitmap Fonts Instead of using Asian scalable fonts, you can use PrintSet to convert the scalable fonts to bitmap fonts and download them to the printer. Asian bitmap fonts are supported by the 3240, 3400d, 3400e, 3440, 3600, 4420, and 4440 printers, generally require less memory, and do not require code page tables like the equivalent scalable fonts. The next table lists the approximate amount of memory required to store Asian bitmap fonts. The memory required depends on the printhead installed in your printer. Approximate Sizes – Asian Bitmap Fonts Point Size

Approximate Size (400 dpi printhead)

Approximate Size (200 dpi printhead)

12 pt 16 pt 24 pt

1.6MB 2.7MB 5.8MB

0.5MB 0.8MB 1.5MB

Traditional Chinese Big 12 pt 5 16 pt

3.1MB 5.25MB

0.9MB 1.6MB

Simplified Chinese GB 12 pt 16 pt

3.5MB 6.2MB

1MB 1.8MB

Japanese Shift-JIS

3.9MB 6.75MB

1.1MB 2MB

TrueType Font Korean KSC-5601

12 pt 16 pt

You may need to install more flash memory on the printer to use these fonts. The amount of memory you need depends on the size and number of fonts you want to install. For more information on downloading bitmap fonts to your printer, see the PrintSet documentation.

Licensing Your Fonts You are responsible for licensing the fonts that you purchase and install in your printers. Contact your font vendor for licensing information.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

43

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

These companies provide TrueType fonts compatible with Intermec printers: Dynalab Inc. 2055 Gateway Place Suite 400 San Jose, CA 95110 Tel: 408-490-4224 Fax: 408-490-2233 www.dynalab.com

Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399 Tel: 425-882-8080 www.microsoft.com

Note: Dynalab provides Chinese, Japanese, and Korean fonts. You can also purchase fonts from their offices in Taiwan and Hong Kong. See the Dynalab web page for the address of these offices.

Creating Bitmap Fonts From TrueType Fonts To create bitmap fonts from TrueType fonts, you must run PrintSet under the correct language version of Windows. For example, to create a Traditional Chinese font, you must run PrintSet under Traditional Chinese Microsoft Windows. In addition, you must install the font using Microsoft Windows in order for PrintSet to correctly convert it to a bitmap font. Note: You can create Traditional or Simplified Chinese bitmap fonts up to a size of 16 points at 400 dpi or 32 points at 200 dpi. The EasyCoder F4 printers do not support bitmap or TrueType Chinese, Japanese, or Korean fonts. For more information, see the PrintSet online documentation.

Creating User-Defined Characters and Fonts You can create user-defined characters and user-defined fonts for use in bar code labels. A user-defined character (UDC) is a custom graphic you can use in graphic fields. For more information, see “User-Defined Character or Graphic Fields” on page 12. A user-defined font (UDF) is a custom font you design yourself. UDFs can be used in human-readable fields or in the interpretive field that accompanies a bar code field. For more information, see “Human-Readable Fields” on page 11 or “Bar Code Fields” on page 11. UDCs and UDFs are created in a six bits per byte format for printers in Advanced mode, or in a one bit per byte format for printers in Emulation mode. You use a variety of IPL commands to create and define user-defined characters and fonts. After you write the command strings that create UDCs and UDFs, you download the command strings to the printer and save them to the printer memory.

44

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Creating User-Defined Characters for Emulation Mode If your Intermec printer is running in Emulation mode (dot size of 10 or 15 mil), UDCs must be downloaded to the printer in one bit per byte format. A one bit per byte bitmap image is an arrangement of ones and zeros that looks similar to the following example. Example of One Bit Per Byte Bitmap Image Bitmap Pattern

Row

000000010000000

Row 0

000000111000000

Row 1

000001011100000

Row 2

000010011110000

Row 3

000100011111000

Row 4

001000011111100

Row 5

010000011111110

Row 6

100000011111111

Row 7

010000010000010

Row 8

001000010000100

Row 9

000100010001000

Row 10

000010010010000

Row 11

000001010100000

Row 12

000000111000000

Row 13

000000010000000

Row 14

If you look closely at the previous table, you can see that it is the outline of a diamond with a line down the middle and the upper right corner blacked in. To create a user-defined character for Emulation mode 1 Draw your design on a piece of graph paper. This procedure uses the next illustration as an example:

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

45

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

2 Convert each of the squares to either a one or a zero, where the blank boxes are zeros and the filled-in boxes are ones. Type these into a text file column by column, as shown here. 000000010000000 000000111000000 000001011100000 000010011110000 000100011111000 001000011111100 010000011111110 100000011111111 010000010000010 001000010000100 000100010001000 000010010010000 000001010100000 000000111000000 000000010000000

3 Read the pattern of ones and zeros down each column starting at the top left corner. The first column on the left becomes the data for the u0 command line: u0,000000010000000

The second column becomes the data for the u1 command line: u1,000000111000000

4 In a new text file, type the command line for all 15 columns, prefacing each line with un: u0,000000010000000 u1,000000111000000 u2,000001010100000 u3,000010010010000 u4,000100010001000 u5,001000010000100 u6,010000010000010 u7,111111110000001 u8,011111110000010 u9,001111110000100 u10,000111110001000 u11,000011110010000 u12,000001110100000 u13,000000111000000 u14,000000010000000

5 Before the u0 command line, create IPL command strings that place the printer in Emulation mode, in Program mode, and define the bitmap as a UDC with field number 3: c P G3;x15;y15

6 Add the ASCII start of text and end of text ( and ) characters to the un command lines. 7 Add a command string to place the printer in Print mode: R

8 Send the file to the printer. The UDC is created and assigned “font 3.” When you specify data for a graphic field in a format, assign c3 to the field to print this graphic in that field.

46

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Example of UDC for Emulation Mode Command Line

Description

c

Places the printer in Emulation mode

P

Places the printer in Program mode

G3;x15;y15;

Creates UDC and assigns it “font 3.”

u0,000000010000000;

Defines column 0

u1,000000101000000;

Defines column 1

u2,000001000100000;

Defines column 2

u3,000010000010000;

Defines column 3

u4,000100000001000;

Defines column 4

u5,001000000000100;

Defines column 5

u6,010000000000010;

Defines column 6

u7,111111111111111;

Defines column 7

u8,011111110000010;

Defines column 8

u9,001111110000100;

Defines column 9

u10,000111110001000;

Defines column 10

u11,000011110010000;

Defines column 11

u12,000001110100000;

Defines column 12

u13,000000111000000;

Defines column 13

u14,000000010000000;

Defines column 14

R;

Saves the graphic and places the printer in Print mode

Creating User-Defined Fonts for Emulation Mode Creating user-defined font characters for Emulation mode is almost identical to the procedure for creating user-defined characters. You need to define the format for each ASCII character you want to use. For help, see “Creating User-Defined Characters for Emulation Mode” on page 45. Additionally, when you write the command strings that define the ASCII characters for the font, you need to include syntax for these commands: •

“Bitmap User-Defined Font, Clear or Define”: This command creates a new font and font number. Syntax is Tn, where n is the font number.



“Bitmap Cell Width for Graphic or UDF, Define”: This command defines the width for all cells that contain a character from this font. Syntax is xn, where n is the cell width in dots.



“Bitmap Cell Height for Graphic or UDF, Define”: This command defines the height for all cells that contain a character from this font. Syntax is yn, where n is the cell height in dots.



“User-Defined Font Character, Create”: This command creates the new character. Syntax is tn, where n is the decimal equivalent of the corresponding ASCII character. For help, see the “Full ASCII Table” on page 76. You need to add this syntax for each new character in your user-defined font.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

47

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

“Intercharacter Space for UDF, Define”: This command defines the amount of space added to the default intercharacter gap length for a bitmap font. Syntax is zn, where n is the number of dots to add to the default spacing of 2. Example of User-Defined Font, One Bit Per Byte Commands

Definition

c

Selects 86XX Emulation mode

P

Enters Program mode

T11,FONT11

Creates bitmap font 11

x10;y14;

Defines cell width and height

t36;Z12;

Creates character 36 ($), character width is 12

u0,00111110001100;

Defines column 0

u1,01111111001110;

Defines column 1

u2,01100011000110;

Defines column 2

u3,01100011000110;

Defines column 3

u4,11111111111111;

Defines column 4

u5,11111111111111;

Defines column 5

u6,01100011000110;

Defines column 6

u7,01100011000110;

Defines column 7

u8,01110011111110;

Defines column 8

u9,00110001111100;

Defines column 9

t105;Z4;

Creates character 105 (i), character width is 4

u4,00110011111111;

Defines column 4

u5,00110011111111;

Defines column 5

R;

Saves and exits to Print mode

Creating User-Defined Characters for Advanced Mode If your Intermec printer is running in Advanced mode (dot size of 2.5 or 5 mil), UDCs must be downloaded to the printer in the six bits per byte format. The six bits per byte format is more compact than one bit per byte. When you use six bits per byte, you can download large graphics more quickly. The difference between 2.5 mil and 5.0 mil modes is the size of the image when it prints. The arrangement of the bits is very important in this format. Eight bits (0 through 7) compose every byte, but the printer only uses bits 0 through 5 to map the image. You must always set bit 6 (the seventh bit) to 1 so you can download data to the printer. 7-bit hosts reserve bit 7 (the eighth bit) for parity and compatibility, so the range of characters for any given UDC is 40 hex (@) to 127 hex ( delete character). The next procedure describes how to create a user-defined character in the six bits per byte format for use in Advanced mode.

48

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

To create a user-defined character for Advanced mode 1 Draw the graphic on graph paper. This procedure uses this graphic as an example:

2 Convert each of the squares to either a one or a zero, where the blank boxes are zeros and the filled-in boxes are ones. Type these into a text file column by column, as shown here: 000000010000000 000000111000000 000001011100000 000010011110000 000100011111000 001000011111100 010000011111110 100000011111111 010000010000010 001000010000100 000100010001000 000010010010000 000001010100000 000000111000000 000000010000000

3 Starting from the top row, divide each vertical column into groups of six digits. If the bottom group has less than six digits, add zeros to this group until it also has six.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

49

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

000000010000000 000000111000000 000001011100000 000010011110000 000100011111000 001000011111100 010000011111110 100000011111111 010000010000010 001000010000100 000100010001000 000010010010000 000001010100000 000000111000000 000000010000000 000000000000000 000000000000000 Zeros added 000000000000000

The six digits in each group are the six bits that you download in a byte of data. The top digit of each group is bit 0, the bottom digit is bit 5. 4 To complete the bit, add ones in the bit 6 position, and then add zeros in the bit 7 position so that each group now has eight digits. 000000010000000 000000111000000 000001011100000 000010011110000 Group 1 000100011111000 001000011111100 111111111111111 000000000000000 010000011111110 100000011111111 010000010000010 001000010000100 Group 2 000100010001000 000010010010000 111111111111111 000000000000000 000001010100000 000000111000000 000000010000000 000000000000000 Group 3 000000000000000 000000000000000 111111111111111 000000000000000

Bit 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bit 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bit 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

5 Starting with the first group of 8 bits in the first column, reverse the order of each group so that bit 0 is now last and bit 7 is first. One way to see this quickly is to imagine rotating each group 90° clockwise, as shown in the next illustration:

50

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

01000000 01000000 01100000 01010000 01001000 01000100 01000010 01111111 01111110 01111100 01111000 01110000 01100000 01000000 01000000

01000010 01000101 01001000 01010000 01100000 01000000 01000000 01111111 01000011 01000011 01100011 01010011 01001011 01000111 01000010

01000000 01000000 01000000 01000000 01000000 01000001 01000010 01000111 01000010 01000001 01000000 01000000 01000000 01000000 01000000

Bit 7

Bit 7

Bit 7

Bit 0

Bit 0

Bit 0

Reading from left to right, each line is now made up of three eight-digit groups, and each group represents an ASCII character in binary form. 6 Translate each line into a string of three ASCII characters. For a list of ASCII characters and binary equivalents, see “Full ASCII Table” on page 76. For example, reading from left to right, the first line is: 01000000

0100001001000000

The equivalent ASCII characters are @[email protected] The entire format should look like this: @[email protected] @[email protected] `[email protected] [email protected] H`@ [email protected] [email protected] G ~CB |CA [email protected] [email protected] `[email protected] @[email protected] @[email protected]

7 In a new text file, write command strings to place the printer in Advanced mode and then in Program mode: C P

8 Write a command string to create a user-defined character, and define its size as 15 x 15 dots: G1;x15;y15

9 Add command strings for the graphic format you created in step 6. Place the ASCII start of text character at the beginning of each line, followed by the

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

51

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

“Graphic or UDC, Define” command syntax (u). Number each line from 0 to 14, and then add the ASCII end of text character to the end of the line: u0,@[email protected] u1,@[email protected] u2,`[email protected] u3,[email protected] u4,H`@ u5,[email protected] u6,[email protected] u7,G u8,~CB u9,|CA u10,[email protected] u11,[email protected] u12,`[email protected] u13,@[email protected] u14,@[email protected]

10 Write a command string to place the printer in Print mode: R

11 Save the text file and send it to the printer. The graphic can now be used in a label format. 12 To print the graphic, send this set of command strings: C P E4;F4 U1;o100,100;c2;w20;h20; R; E4

This graphic prints:

The next table lists the complete command string set for the UDC example. Command Strings for User-Defined Character Example

52

Command

Definition

C

Places the printer in Advanced mode

P

Places the printer in Program mode

G1;x15;y15

Creates UDC 1, 15 rows by 15 columns

u0,@[email protected]

Defines column 0

u1,@[email protected]

Defines column 1

u2,`[email protected]

Defines column 2

u3,[email protected]

Defines column 3

u4,H`@

Defines column 4

u5,[email protected]

Defines column 5

u6,[email protected]

Defines column 6

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

Command Strings for User-Defined Character Example (continued) Command

Definition

u7,G

Defines column 7

u8,~CB

Defines column 8

u9,|CA

Defines column 9

u10,[email protected]

Defines column 10

u11,[email protected]

Defines column 11

u12,`[email protected]

Defines column 12

u13,@[email protected]

Defines column 13

u14,@[email protected]

Defines column 14

R

Saves and exits to Print mode

C

Places the printer in Advanced mode

P

Places the printer in Program mode

E4;F4

Erases current format 4 and creates new format 4

U1;o100,100;c2;w20;h20

Creates graphic field 1, origin of 100,100, uses graphic 1, and magnifies it by a factor of 20

R

Saves and exits to Print mode

E4

Selects format 4



Prints the format

Creating User-Defined Font Characters for Advanced Mode Creating user-defined font characters for Advanced mode is almost identical to the procedure for creating user-defined characters. You need to define the format for each ASCII character you want to use. For help, see “Creating User-Defined Characters for Advanced Mode” on page 48. Additionally, when you write the command strings that define the ASCII characters for the font, you need to include syntax for these commands: •

“Bitmap User-Defined Font, Clear or Define”: This command creates a new font and font number. Syntax is Tn, where n is the font number.



“Bitmap Cell Width for Graphic or UDF, Define”: This command defines the width for all cells that contain a character from this font. Syntax is xn, where n is the cell width in dots.



“Bitmap Cell Height for Graphic or UDF, Define”: This command defines the height for all cells that contain a character from this font. Syntax is yn, where n is the cell height in dots.



“User-Defined Font Character, Create”: This command creates the new character. Syntax is tn, where n is the decimal equivalent of the corresponding ASCII character. For help, see the “Full ASCII Table” on page 76. You need to add this syntax for each new character in your user-defined font.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

53

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics



“Intercharacter Space for UDF, Define”: This command defines the amount of space added to the default intercharacter gap length for a bitmap font. Syntax is zn, where n is the number of dots to add to the default spacing of 2.

To create a user-defined font character for Advanced mode 1 Follow Steps 1 to 7 of “To create a user-defined character for Advanced mode” on page 49. This procedure uses the following graphic as an example:

2 Write a command string to create a user-defined font: T3,FONT3

3 Write a command string that defines the width and height for cells that contain characters in this font. For this example, the width and height are defined as 10 and 14 dots respectively: x10;y14

4 Write a command string that creates the specific ASCII character and defines the width of that character. For this example, the user-defined graphic corresponds to the $ symbol (ASCII character 36) and has a width of 12 dots: t36;z12

5 Add command strings for the character format you created earlier. Place the ASCII start of text character at the beginning of each line, followed by the “Graphic or UDC, Define” command syntax (u). Number each line from 0 to 14, and then add the ASCII end of text character to the end of the line: u0,|[email protected]; u1,~sA; u2,FcA; u3,FcA; u4,C; u5,C; u6,FcA; u7,FcA; u8,NA; u9,[email protected];

6 Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each character in your user-defined font. You must create and download all characters in a user-defined font at the same time. If you try to add other user-defined characters to an already existing user-defined font, you erase previously created characters. 7 Write a command string to place the printer in Print mode:

54

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

R

8 Save the text file and send it to the printer. The user-defined font can now be used in a bar code label. You can specify the userdefined font for a human-readable or interpretive field. Characters in data you specify for those fields are mapped to the user-defined font. The next table lists the complete command string set for the user-defined font in this example. Command Strings for User-Defined Font Example Commands

Definitions

C

Selects Advanced mode

P;

Enters Program mode

T3,FONT3

Create bitmap font 3

x10;y14;

Define cell width (10) and cell height (14)

t36;Z12;

Create ASCII character 36 ($), define character width as 12

u0,|[email protected];

Defines column 0

u1,~sA;

Defines column 1

u2,FcA;

Defines column 2

u3,FcA;

Defines column 3

u4,C;

Defines column 4

u5,C;

Defines column 5

u6,FcA;

Defines column 6

u7,FcA;

Defines column 7

u8,NA;

Defines column 8

u9,[email protected];

Defines column 9

R;

Saves and exits to Print mode

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

55

Chapter 3 — Working with Fonts and Graphics

56

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

4 Advanced Printer Programming

This chapter discusses topics for advanced IPL programmers and includes these sections: •

Using the Printer Memory Efficiently



Reimaging Modified Fields



Using Emulation Mode



Using Legacy Mode



Using Direct Graphics Mode



Designing Pages

57

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

Using the Printer Memory Efficiently To get the best performance from your printer, you need to use the printer RAM efficiently. This section includes tips for efficient use of printer memory. Note: For the 3240, 3400C, 3400D, 3600, and 4100, using a significant amount of available memory for storage affects printer performance because there is less memory available for imaging.

How Is the Printer Storage Memory Used? Although the printer contains enough static RAM or flash to store several different label formats, downloaded fonts, graphics, and data, you should be careful of how you use your printer memory. Printers use either static RAM or flash memory for storing tables, pages, formats, fonts, and user-defined characters (UDCs). Some printers allow you to use the PrintSet application to adjust the amount of storage memory available for storage purposes. If you require additional storage memory, you can purchase a memory expansion option.

Making the Most of Your Storage Memory There are limits to the number of formats, fonts, graphics, or pages that you can store in the printer. You can define up to 16 fonts, but there may not be enough room depending on the amount of memory being used for other purposes. The more formats, graphics, and fonts you store, the less memory is available. When you encounter a memory usage problem, use PrintSet to see how much memory is available. You must upload the memory information from the printer first. For more information, see the PrintSet online help. You can increase your available memory by following one of these suggestions: •

Delete any unneeded user-defined fonts, graphics, pages, or formats. For help, see the PrintSet online help or the specific commands in the IPL Command Reference Manual.



For the 3240, 3400 (except 3400e), 3600, and 4100 printers, you can adjust the amount of RAM allocated for storage purposes. For help, see the PrintSet software or the “Amount of Storage, Define” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.



Purchase additional memory. For more information, contact your Intermec sales representative.

Reimaging Modified Fields Note: This section applies only to the 3240, 3400C, 3400D, 3600, and 4100 printers.

58

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

You can reimage only the changed fields in a label format instead of the entire label. To update data in only changed fields, use the “Format, Select” command to specify that only changed fields should be reimaged. If used correctly, this command parameter can greatly increase the throughput of your printer; however, if you reimage a field that takes longer to erase and reimage than erasing and reimaging the entire label format, you will not be increasing throughput. Follow the next procedure to use the “Format, Select” command as described. To use the modified field reimaging command 1 Make sure that you select enough image bands to allow the printer to retain the entire label image. One image band is equal to 2.54 cm (1 in) of label length. 2 Select the fields to reimage by using the following command: En,1

where n is the format ID to be edited, and 1 specifies that only the changed fields should be reimaged. For more information, see the “Format, Select” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual. 3 Print the label to see if throughput is improved.

Using Emulation Mode Note: Emulation mode is not supported by the 4630 and 4830 printers, or by PD/ PF/PM/PX series printers with 300 dpi printheads. Emulation mode lets you print bar code labels that were designed on an 86XX printer in multiples of 10 or 15 mil. (“Emulation mode” is also called “86XX Emulation mode” in some printer manuals.) Here is a summary of the features in Emulation mode: •

Pages are not available.



Character size is specified by height and width magnification only.



International characters are preceded by or selectable by language.



The bitmaps for user-defined characters (UDC) and user-defined fonts (UDF) are one bit per byte (instead of six bits per byte).



Print resolution is in 10 mil dots.



RFID commands are not available.

Two IPL commands place the printer in Emulation mode: •

Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up



Emulation Mode, Enter

The following table lists all the IPL commands that work when the printer is in Emulation mode.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

59

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

IPL Commands and Emulation Mode IPL Command Name

Syntax

12 Volt Supply Value, Transmit

U C j d e k c B y x T b W X r p C ; P p A N

Abort Print Job Advanced Mode, Select Alphanumeric Field Separator Auto-Transmit 1, Enable Auto-Transmit 2, Enable Auto-Transmit 3, Enable Auto-Transmit 1, 2, and 3, Disable Bar Code, Select Type Bar Code Field, Create or Edit Batch Count, Set Bitmap Cell Height for Graphic or UDF, Define Bitmap Cell Width for Graphic or UDF, Define Bitmap User-Defined Font, Clear or Define Border Around Human-Readable Text, Define Box Field, Create or Edit Character Bitmap Origin Offset, Define Character Rotation or Bar Code Ratio, Define Clear All Data Clear Data From Current Field Code 39 Prefix Character, Define Command Tables, Load Command Terminator Command Terminator 1 Command Terminator 2 Communication Port Configuration, Set Configuration Parameters, Transmit Control Panel Access Permission, Set Current Edit Session, Save Cut

60

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

IPL Commands and Emulation Mode (continued) IPL Command Name

Syntax

Cutter, Enable or Disable

c K d e g c C D D D F d D f I o v Z c A or F E E x q O m M f c u h h H I N z I

Dark Adjust Dark Adjust, Set Data Shift - International Characters Data Source for Format in a Page, Define Direct Graphics Mode, Select Emulation Mode, Enter Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up End-of-Print Skip Distance, Set Error Code, Request Factory Defaults, Reset Field, Delete Field, Select Field Data, Define Source Field Decrement, Set Field Direction, Define Field Increment, Set Field Origin, Define First Data Entry Field, Select Font, Transmit Font Character Width, Define Font Type, Select Form Feed Format, Create or Edit Format, Erase Format, Select Format, Transmit Format Direction in a Page, Define Format Offset Within a Page, Define Format Position From Page, Delete Format Position in a Page, Assign Formats, Print Graphic, Select Graphic or UDC, Define Hardware Configuration Label, Print Height Magnification of Bar, Box, or UDC, Human-Readable Field, Create or Edit IBM Language Translation, Enable or Disable Increment and Decrement, Disable Intercharacter Delay, Set Intercharacter Space for UDF, Define Interpretive Field, Edit

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

61

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

IPL Commands and Emulation Mode (continued)

62

IPL Command Name

Syntax

Interpretive Field, Enable or Disable Label and Gap Length, Transmit Label Rest Point, Adjust Label Retract, Enable or Disable Label Retract Distance, Set Label Stock Type, Select Label Taken Sensor Value, Transmit Length of Line or Box Field, Define Line Field, Create or Edit Maximum Label Length, Set Media Fault Recovery Mode, Set Media Sensitivity, Select Memory Usage, Transmit Message Delay, Set Next Data Entry Field, Select Number of Image Bands, Set Numeric Field Separator Options Selected, Transmit Outline Font, Clear or Create Outline Font, Download Page, Create or Edit Page, Delete Page, Select Page, Transmit Pages, Print Pin 11/20 Protocol, Set Pitch Label, Print Pitch Size, Set Point Size, Set Postamble, Set Preamble, Set Print Print Quality Label, Print Print Speed, Set Printer Language, Select Printhead Loading Mode, Select Printhead Parameters, Transmit Printhead Temperature Sensor Value, Transmit Program Mode, Enter Program Mode, Exit Program Number, Transmit Quantity Count, Set

I L f R r T T l L L e g m I O J j S s G y p p C g k Q S l h H P P R M

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

IPL Commands and Emulation Mode (continued) IPL Command Name

Syntax

Reflective Sensor Value, Transmit Remaining Quantity and Batch Count, Transmit Reset Self-Strip, Enable or Disable Slash Zero, Enable or Disable Software Configuration Label, Print Start and Stop Codes (Code 39), Print Status Dump Status Enquiry Takeup Motor Torque, Increase Test and Service Mode, Enter Test and Service Mode, Exit Top of Form, Set Transmissive Sensor Value, Transmit User-Defined Character (UDC) and Graphics, User-Defined Character, Clear or Create User-Defined Character Field, Create or Edit User-Defined Characters, Transmit User-Defined Font Character, Create User-Defined Fonts, Print User-Defined Tables, Transmit Warm Boot Width of Line, Box, Bar, or Character, Define

M Q t z s b T R F G g G U u t t Z w

Using Legacy Mode Legacy mode lets you print bar code labels that were designed on legacy 3400/4420 printers. Here is a summary of the features in Emulation mode: •

Fonts 23 and 24 will be bitmapped fonts instead of scalable fonts.



Fonts 25, 26, and 28 will be Speedo fonts, and fonts 20 to 22, and 30 to 41 will be generated from the corresponding Speedo fonts.



Code 39 will be 86XX-compatible. When the fields and formats are stored in Legacy Mode, they can be printed in any mode regardless of the mode the printer is in.



When the Legacy mode setting is changed, an automatic reboot will be triggered upon exiting Setup.

Two IPL commands place the printer in Legacy mode: •

Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up



Emulation Mode, Enter

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

63

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

For help, see the “Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

Using Direct Graphics Mode You can significantly reduce the amount of time necessary to download and image a graphic by using Direct Graphics mode. Direct Graphics mode allows the printer to receive a compressed bitmap graphic and image it directly into the image bands without storing it in the printer. Before you download the graphic, you must compress it into run-length encoded (RLE) data. The data compression greatly reduces the amount of data to download and the rasterized graphic requires minimal processing to image it into the image bands. You no longer need to store the graphic in Program mode and then set up a format in Print mode. When you download a direct graphic to the printer, the printer stores the graphic in the image bands until you: •

clear the label data.



set up another format.



enter Program mode or Test and Service mode.

When printing a label with direct graphics, you must have enough dynamic RAM installed in your printer to contain the entire label. Because Intermec printers normally reuse image bands, you can print long labels with standard RAM; however, when you download direct graphics, the printer retains no information regarding the existence of the graphic in its image bands. Therefore, the printer cannot reuse those image bands when you download a direct graphic. With standard memory, you should be able to print almost any label up to 15.2 cm (6 in) long. You may need to install more memory for longer labels.

What Is Run-Length Encoding? Run-length encoding (RLE) is a method of compressing bitmap graphics. RLE compresses graphics that have repeated runs of white or black dots in a column, reducing the amount of time required to download the graphics to a printer. RLE sends a series of commands that define each bitmap column of a graphic and takes advantage of a series of repeated dots within a column by encoding them as transition commands. Instead of sending the entire column of bitmap data, it sends commands telling the printer how many series of black and white dots to image. If columns are identical, a command can instruct the printer to repeat the last column. RLE is ideal for bar code graphics or designs with simple patterns. In cases where patterns do not exist, you can send uncompressed bitmap data to the printer. You can mix raw bitmap data and RLE commands to ensure the most efficient way to download a graphic. The RLE file may contain five types of data, each of which is one byte long:

64

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

Immediate Commands Recognized and executed as regular IPL commands or protocol commands. Syntax is removed from compressed data. •

Byte format (7-0): 000xxxx



Range is 0 to 31

Compression Encoding Commands Used as part of the compressed graphics file to change or set data modes, repeat lines, change the origin for the next lines of data, or end the compressed graphics file and return to IPL command printing. •

Byte format (7-0): 001xxxx



Range is 32 to 63

Low Order Data Can represent up to 7 bits of data (0 to 127). Must be preceded by a command byte so the printer knows how to interpret them. •

7 bits long and may be combined with high order data. 8th bit is always set to 1.



Byte format (7-0): 1xxxxxx.



Range is 128 to 255

High Order Data When combined with low order data, can represent up to 13 bits of data (0-8191). Must be preceded by a command byte so the printer knows how to interpret them. Printer ignores high order data followed by a command or more high order data. •

6 bits long and always combined with low order data. 7th bit is always set to 1 and 8th bit is always set to 0.



Byte format (7-0): 01xxxxx



Range: 64 - 127



Data represented: 0 to 63

Bitmap Data Composed of uncompressed bytes (7 data bits per byte) that represent columns of your graphic. 8th bit is always set to 1. •

Byte format (7-0): 1xxxxxx



Range: 128 to 255



Data represented: Raw data

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

65

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

Example of Direct Graphics Commands This example consists of two parts: a graphic and a line. The origin of the direct graphic is defined the same as the origin of a normal graphic. In this example, the coordinates for the origin of the complex graphic are 0,450; however, once you enter Direct Graphics mode, your printer loads the information in the reverse y direction. Each column of the graphic loads from the bottom to the top. Y coordinates now start at 0 from the bottom left corner and increase in size as the data loads. So, the printer starts loading data for the complex graphic at 0,450 and loads up to 0,425. Likewise, the data for the line starts loading at 19,450 and loads up to 19,0.

Origin (0,0)

25

450 . . . . . . . 25

24

24

23

23

22

22

21

21

20

20

19

19

18

18

17

17

16

16

15

15

14

14

13

13

12

12

11

11

10

10

9

9

8

8

7

7

6

6

5

5

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

0

0 0 1

2

3

4

5

6 . . . . . .

19

0,450

19,450

Direct Graphics Commands: This example shows how the printer loads information in Direct Graphics mode.

This table shows a hex data file for the example: Hex Data File 1B

67

30

21

80

43

C2

27

90

A8

D5

90

22

26

84

96

22

22

26

8C

84

22

24

82

25

88

22

21

93

43

C2

25

43

C2

28

The next table explains the hex data file in the example.

66

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

Hex Data Commands in Example Data

Command

Description

1B 67 30

g0

Enter Direct Graphics mode

21 80 43 C2

0x21 80 43 C2

Change origin 80 - 80 (LO) = 0x00 -> X0 43 - 40 (HI) = 0x03 C2 - 80 (LO) = 0x42 (0x03 ∗ 0x80) + 0x42 = 1C2 -> Y450

27 90 A8 D5 90 22

0x27 90 A8 D5 90 0x22

Raw bitmap data follows, starts at Y0 90 - 80 (LO) = 0x10 -> 1 dot at Y4 A8 - 80 (LO) = 0x28 -> 2 dots at Y10 and Y12 D5 - 80 (LO) = 0x45 -> 3 dots at Y14, Y17, and Y20 90 - 80 (LO) = 0x10 -> 1 dot at Y25 End of line

26 84 96 22

0x26 84 96 0x22

Transition white 84 - 80 (LO) = 4 white 96 - 80 (LO) = 22 black End of line

22

0x22

End of line

26 8C 84 22

0x26 8D 84 0x22

Transition white 8D - 80 (LO) = 13 white 84 - 80 (LO) = 4 black End of line

24 82

0x24 82

Repeat last line 82 - 80 (LO) = 2 times

25 88 22

0x25 88 0x22

Transition black 89 - 80 (LO) = 9 black End of line

21 93 43 C2

0x21 93 43 C2

Change origin 93 - 80 (LO) = 0x13 -> X19 43 - 40 (HI) = 0x03 C2 - 80 (LO) = 0x42 (0x03 ∗ 0x80) + 0x42 = 1C2 -> Y450

25 43 C2

0x25 43 C2

Transition black 43 - 40 (HI) = 0x03 C2 - 80 (LO) = 0x42 (0x03 ∗ 0x80) + 0x42 = 1C2 -> Y450

28

0x28

End of bitmap

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

67

Chapter 4 — Advanced Printer Programming

Designing Pages A page is a collection of one or more formats that you combine to print at the same time. This feature is helpful when you need to print several different labels for an application at once. For example, you may need to attach one type of label to a product and a different type of label to its container. With the page printing capability, you can print both labels at the same time. Because you can print pages of several formats at once, you can also print labels on media rolls that have different sizes and shapes of labels already precut. When you group label formats into a page, you assign the formats to positions designated by the letters a through z. You can print the formats used in pages independent of each other.

68

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

5 Troubleshooting

This chapter describes the problems that may occur as a result of using IPL commands incorrectly. If you do not find your problem listed here, see the troubleshooting information in your printer user’s manual.

69

Chapter 5 — Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting Checklist If you receive an error message from the printer or have problems while operating the printer, follow the next procedure to troubleshoot the printer. To troubleshoot your printer 1 Send the “Error Code, Request” command (syntax ) to the printer and see if the printer returns an error message. 2 If the printer returns an error message, find it in the section called “Interpreting Error Codes and Solving Problems” on page 71. Follow the instructions in the table to correct the problem. If the printer does not return an error message, try to locate the symptom in the “Printer Operation Problems” and “Print Quality Problems” sections of the printer user’s manual. Follow the instructions in the manual to correct the problem. 3 Clean the printer components and check all connections. For more information, see the user’s manual for your printer. 4 If the problem persists, contact Intermec Product Support (1-800-755-5505) in North America. If you are an international customer, contact your local Intermec representative.

How the Printer Handles Error Conditions This section describes how the printer handles error conditions that may occur while you use IPL commands.

Syntax Errors The printer responds to syntax errors in the messages it receives from the host by attempting to execute the commands. It does not ignore a command with a syntax error; instead, the printer produces output, even if it is wrong. This output helps determine what went wrong and what should be done to correct the problem. For more information on command syntax, see the IPL Command Reference Manual.

Parameter Errors Certain commands require optional parameters. If you do not supply these parameters, the printer substitutes default values. If a parameter is above its maximum range limit, the printer uses the maximum value. If it falls below the minimum range, the printer uses the minimum value. See the IPL Command Reference Manual for the range and default value for each command.

Image Overrun Errors Image overrun occurs when a label is too complex to image for a given print speed. An overrun will cause the printer to abort the label being printed. This error is most common on labels over 12.7 cm (5 in) long.

70

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 5 — Troubleshooting

The printer automatically attempts to correct for this error condition by resetting to the lowest print speed and to the highest number of image bands, then repeats printing the label. The printer remains at this setting until you reset it. If an image overrun still occurs, printing for that batch of labels stops and the printer executes any following commands. Note: Installing more memory may decrease image overrun errors.

Invalid Numeric Character Errors If you include non-numeric characters within a numeric data string in a command, the printer ignores them and continues to process the rest of the valid numeric characters. If a non-numeric character begins the numeric data string, however, the printer uses a default value for the affected command. Here are two examples of valid numeric character strings and one example of an invalid string: Valid: 12a Valid: 1a2 Invalid: a12

Insufficient Storage Memory Errors Before storing new formats, graphics, or user-defined fonts in the static RAM or flash, the printer ensures that it has sufficient memory to store them. If there is insufficient memory, the printer ignores the last editing session and preserves the existing data in the storage memory.

Interpreting Error Codes and Solving Problems Most of the problems you may encounter cause the printer to send an error code to the host. To correct the error, find the error code in the following table and complete the instructions in the solution column. Note: For information on specific commands, see the IPL Command Reference Manual.

Error Codes and Possible Solutions Error Code Description of Problem

Solution

00

No error.

No action is necessary.

02

Invalid number of bar code characters (UPC/EAN).

Verify the number of bar code characters used. For more information, see the “Bar Code, Select Type” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

11

Invalid bar code data.

Verify data in the label format.

12

Data count exceeded.

Data count should not exceed what is specified for the field.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

71

Chapter 5 — Troubleshooting

Error Codes and Possible Solutions (continued) Error Code Description of Problem

Solution

21

Quantity or batch count out of range.

Quantity of labels or number of batches should be between 1 and 9999.

22

Field increment/decrement out of range.

Quantity should be between 1 and 9999.

25

Invalid format transmission syntax.

Check the “Format, Transmit” command syntax.

26

Invalid page transmission syntax.

Check the “Page, Transmit” command syntax.

27

Invalid font transmission syntax.

Check the “Font, Transmit” command syntax.

28

Invalid UDC transmission syntax.

Check the “User-Defined Characters, Transmit” command syntax.

33

Invalid field delimiters.

Check for all pairs of field delimiters and make sure both are numeric, or both are alphanumeric.

34

Invalid escape command.

Correct the escape command syntax.

35

Invalid data shift command.

Correct the shift command syntax.

36

Invalid or undefined format number.

Verify that the format numbers are between 0 and 19.

37

Insufficient room in RAM to print format.

Reduce the number of data fields in the format or add more DRAM.

38

Invalid or undefined field number.

Verify the field number in the label format.

41

Syntax error for program commands.

Check the program command for proper syntax.

42

Insufficient room in RAM to store format.

Empty the buffer contents. If the format still does not fit, delete some fields or other data from the format. You may have to remove or reduce the UDCs, formats, or fonts if necessary. To determine the amount of installed and available memory, send the “Memory Usage, Transmit” command.

43

Too many fields in label format.

You can use up to 200 fields in a format and each field can use up to 250 characters. Reduce field size or delete some fields.

46

Undefined statement.

Check the statement syntax.

52

Invalid UDC/UDF bitmap cell height/width Verify that the UDC/UDF bitmap cell height/width or or intercharacter space. intercharacter space is within the specified values for n. For more information, see these commands in the IPL Command Reference Manual: • “Bitmap Cell Height for Graphic or UDF, Define” • “User-Defined Character Field, Create or Edit” • “Intercharacter Space for UDF, Define”

53

Not enough room in RAM to store UDC or Remove or reduce formats, fonts, or UDCs. UDF.

54

Invalid UDC command syntax.

Correct the UDC command syntax.

55

Not enough room in RAM to store downloaded font.

Add more printer RAM.

56

Flash file system error.

57

Invalid parameter.

Correct the syntax.

60

No RFID support.

The printer is unable to access the RFID module. Contact your local Intermec representative.

61

No RFID tag found.

The RFID module has determined that the printer does not have RFID media loaded. Load RFID media. Verify that the TAGADJUST value aligns the tag over the antenna. For help, see the “RFID Parameters, Set” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

72

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Chapter 5 — Troubleshooting

Error Codes and Possible Solutions (continued) Error Code Description of Problem

Solution

62

Access outside of the RFID tag memory.

The defined RFID tag field specifies a position outside of the tag’s memory or the tag read/write operation was not successful (bad tag). Verify that the field specifies a position within the tag’s memory. For help, see the RFID Tag Field Setup command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

63

RFID number conversion error.

You have entered an invalid hex or numerical (NUM) format in the data string. Enter a valid value.

64

RFID inactive (off).

You have a printer with an RFID module and you have defined RFID commands, but you have turned RFID mode off. Turn RFID mode on. For help, see the RFID Parameters, Set command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

65

RFID tag type does not support the selected An application has sent a command with an argument that is not option. supported by the printer’s tag type. Verify that the application commands match the printer’s tag type.

66

RFID module overheated.

The printer RFID module has exceeded its recommended operating temperature and shut down automatically. Wait until the module has cooled to the recommended operating temperature before you try to print tags again.

67

RFID module duty cycle exceeded.

The printer RFID module has exceeded its recommended duty cycle and shut down automatically. You may need to check the RFID module settings. For help, see the Basic Reader Interface (BRI) Programmer’s Reference Manual.

68

RFID lock error.

You are trying to write data to a locked RFID tag. Use the “RFID Tag Protect” command to unlock the tag and try again.

69

RFID Access error.

Check the syntax for the “RFID Tag Write Field, Create or Edit” command.

70

Illegal number of characters.

Check all parameter settings in your syntax.

71

Illegal characters.

Check all characters in your syntax and correct them if necessary.

Printing Labels with 86XX-Compatible Code 39 Note: This section applies to the PF/PM/PX series printers only.

If you are using a PF/PM/PX series printer, and are having trouble printing Code 39 labels designed for an 86XX printer, use the “Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up” command to place the printer in Legacy Emulation mode. In this mode: •

Code 39 characters are interpreted as 86XX-compatible Code 39 characters. For example, the characters $, / +, and % are encoded as $, /, +, and % instead of as /D, /O, /K, and /E.



Fonts 23 and 24 are bitmap fonts instead of TrueDoc fonts.



Fonts 25, 26, and 28 are Speedo fonts instead of TrueDoc fonts.



Fonts 20, 21, 22, and 30 through 41 are generated from the corresponding Speedo fonts.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

73

Chapter 5 — Troubleshooting

For more information, see the “Emulation or Advanced Mode on Power-Up” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

74

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

A Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

This appendix contains the full ASCII chart, with binary, hexadecimal, and Code 39 equivalents, and an ASCII control character chart. The appendix also includes tables that show which hex codes to download for international characters not available in the U.S. character set.

75

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Full ASCII Table Full ASCII Table Binary0

Hex1

Decimal

Code 39

ASCII2

Binary0

Hex1

Decimal

Code 39

ASCII2

00000000

00

00

%U

NUL

00100011

23

35

/C

#

00000001

01

01

$A

SOH

00100100

24

36

/D

$

00000010

02

02

$B

STX

00100101

25

37

/E

%

00000011

03

03

$C

ETX

00100110

26

38

/F

&

00000100

04

04

$D

EOT

00100111

27

39

/G

'

00000101

05

05

$E

ENQ

00101000

28

40

/H

(

00000110

06

06

$F

ACK

00101001

29

41

/I

)

00000111

07

07

$G

BEL

00101010

2A

42

/J

*

00001000

08

08

$H

BS

00101011

2B

43

/K

+

00001001

09

09

$I

HT

00101100

2C

44

/L

,

00001010

0A

10

$J

LF

00101101

2D

45

/M

-

00001011

0B

11

$K

VT

00101110

2E

46

/N

.

00001100

0C

12

$L

FF

00101111

2F

47

/O

/

00001101

0D

13

$M

CR

00110000

30

48

/P4

0

00001110

0E

14

$N

SO

00110001

31

49

/Q

1

00001111

0F

15

$O

SI

00110010

32

50

/R

2

00010000

10

16

$P

DLE

00110011

33

51

/S

3

00010001

11

17

$Q

DC1

00110100

34

52

/T

4

00010010

12

18

$R

DC2

00110101

35

53

/U

5

00010011

13

19

$S

DC3

00110110

36

54

/V

6

00010100

14

20

$T

DC4

00110111

37

55

/W

7

00010101

15

21

$U

NAK

00111000

38

56

/X

8

00010110

16

22

$V

SYN

00111001

39

57

/Y

9

00010111

17

23

$W

ETB

00111010

3A

58

/Z

:

00011000

18

24

$X

CAN

00111011

3B

59

%F

;

00011001

19

25

$Y

EM

00111100

3C

60

%G

<

00011010

1A

26

$Z

SUB

00111101

3D

61

%H

=

00011011

1B

27

%A

ESC

00111110

3E

62

%I

>

00011100

1C

28

%B

FS

00111111

3F

63

%J

?

00011101

1D

29

%C

GS

01000000

40

64

%V

@

00011110

1E

30

%D

RS

01000001

41

65

A

A

00011111

1F

31

%E

US

01000010

42

66

B

B

01000011

43

67

C

C

3

00100000

20

32

SP

SP

00100001

21

33

/A

!

01000100

44

68

D

D

00100010

22

34

/B

"

01000101

45

69

E

E

01000110

46

70

F

F

01100011

63

99

+C

c

01000110

46

70

F

F

01100011

63

99

+C

c

01000111

47

71

G

G

01100100

64

100

+D

d

76

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Full ASCII Table (continued) Binary0

Hex1

Decimal

Code 39

ASCII2

Binary0

Hex1

Decimal

Code 39

ASCII2

01001000

48

72

H

H

01100101

65

101

+E

e

01001001

49

73

I

I

01100110

66

102

+F

f

01001010

4A

74

J

J

01100111

67

103

+G

g

01001011

4B

75

K

K

01101000

68

104

+H

h

01001100

4C

76

L

L

01101001

69

105

+I

i

01001101

4D

77

M

M

01101010

6A

106

+J

j

01001110

4E

78

N

N

01101011

6B

107

+K

k

01001111

4F

79

O

O

01101100

6C

108

+L

l

01010000

50

80

P

P

01101101

6D

109

+M

m

01010001

51

81

Q

Q

01101110

6E

110

+N

n

01010010

52

82

R

R

01101111

6F

111

+O

o

01010011

53

83

S

S

01110000

70

112

+P

p

01010100

54

84

T

T

01110001

71

113

+Q

q

01010101

55

85

U

U

01110010

72

114

+R

r

01010110

56

86

V

V

01110011

73

115

+S

s

01010111

57

87

W

W

01110100

74

116

+T

t

01011000

58

88

X

X

01110101

75

117

+U

u

01011001

59

89

Y

Y

01110110

76

118

+V

v

01011010

5A

90

Z

Z

01110111

77

119

+W

w

01011011

5B

91

%K

[

01111000

78

120

+X

x

01011100

5C

92

%L

\

01111001

79

121

+Y

y

01011101

5D

93

%M

]

01111010

7A

122

+Z

z

01011110

5E

94

%N

^

01111011

7B

123

%P

{

01011111

5F

95

%O

_

01111100

7C

124

%Q

|

01100000

60

96

%W

`

01111101

7D

125

%R

}

01100001

61

97

+A

a

01111110

7E

126

%S

~

01100010

62

98

+B

b

01111111

7F

127

%T5

n6

Notes: 0 Bit positions are 76543210. 1 Hexadecimal value 2 ASCII character 3 SP is the SPACE character. 4 The Code 39 characters /P through /Y may be interchanged with the numbers 0 through 9. 5 May be interchanged with %X or %Y or %Z. 6 n is the DELETE character.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

77

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Full ASCII Control Characters Table

78

Control Character

Control Code

Definition

NUL

ˆ@

Null, or all zeroes

SOH

ˆA

Start of Heading

STX

ˆB

Start of Text

ETX

ˆC

End of Text

EOT

ˆD

End of Transmission

ENQ

ˆE

Enquiry

ACK

ˆF

Acknowledgment

BEL

ˆG

Bell

BS

ˆH

Backspace

HT

ˆI

Horizontal Tab

LF

ˆJ

Line Feed

VT

ˆK

Vertical Tab

FF

ˆL

Form Feed

CR

ˆM

Carriage Return

SO

ˆN

Shift Out

SI

ˆO

Shift In

DLE

ˆP

Data Link Escape

DC1

ˆQ

Device Control 1 (XON)

DC2

ˆR

Device Control 2

DC3

ˆS

Device Control 3 (XOFF)

DC4

ˆT

Device Control

NAK

ˆU

Negative Acknowledge

SYN

ˆV

Synchronous Idle

ETB

ˆW

End Transmission Block

CAN

ˆX

Cancel

EM

ˆY

End of Medium

SUB

ˆZ

Substitute

ESC

ˆ[

Escape

FS

ˆ\

File Separator

GS

ˆ]

Group Separator

RS

ˆˆ

Record Separator

US

ˆ_

Unit Separator

SP

None

Space

DEL

ˆ?

Delete

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

International Character Sets The following tables show which hex codes to download for international characters not available in the U.S. character set. To use the tables, find the hex code for the U.S. character that corresponds with the character in your language.

Advanced Character Table If you are running your printer in Advanced mode, use this table to find the right hex codes for the international character sets.

U.S. ASCII

23

24

40

5B

5C

5D

5E

60

7B

7C

7D

7E

#

$

@

[

\

]

^

`

{

¦

}

~ -

U.K. ASCII

£

$

@

[

\

]

^

`

{

¦

}

Germany

#

$

§

Ä

Ö

Ü

^

`

ä

ö

ü

France

£

$

à

°

ç

§

^

`

é

ù

è

ß ¨

Norway/Denmark #

$

@

Æ

Ø

Å

^

`

æ

ø

å

-

Sweden/Finland

#

¤

É

Ä

Ö

Å

Ü

é

ä

ö

å

ü

Spain

£

$

§

¡

Ñ

¿

^

`

°

ñ

ç

~

Switzerland

#

$

à

°

ç

é

^

ù

ä

ö

ü

è

Italy

£

$

§

°

ç

é

^

ù

à

ò

è

ì

86XX Character Table This table shows the hex codes for the character sets that print if your printer is running under 86XX emulation mode. 23

24

40

5B

5C

5D

5E

60

7B

7C

7D

7E

U.S. ASCII

#

$

@

[

\

]

^

`

{

¦

}

~

U.K. ASCII

£

$

@

[

\

]

^

`

{

¦

}

~

Germany

#

$

§

Ä

Ö

Ü

^

`

ä

ö

ü

ß

France

£

$

à

°

ç

§

^

`

é

ù

è

¨

Norway/Denmark #

$

@

Æ

Ø

Å

^

`

æ

ø

å

~

Sweden/Finland

#

¤

É

Ä

Ö

Å

Ü

é

ä

ö

å

ü

Spain

Pt

$

@

¡

Ñ

¿

^

`

¨

ñ

ç

~

Switzerland

#

$

à

°

ç

é

^

ù

ä

ö

ü

è

Italy

#

$

§

°

ç

é

^

ù

à

ò

è

ì

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

79

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

IBM Translation Character Table This table shows the hex codes for the international character sets that print if your printer is running with Translation enabled. 21

23

24

40

5B

5C

5D

5E

60

7B

7C

7D

7E

U.S. ASCII

¦

#

$

@

¢

\

!

ÿ

`

{

¦

}

U.K. ASCII

¦

#

£

@

$

\

!

ÿ

`

{

¦

}

~ -

Germany

!

#

$

§

Ä

Ö

Ü

^

`

ä

ö

ü

ß

France

!

£

$

à

°

ç

§

^

`

é

ù

è

¨

Norway/Denmark !

Æ

Å

Ø

#

\

¤

^

`

æ

ø

å

ü

Sweden/Finland

!

Ä

Å

Ö

§

É

¤

^

é

ä

ö

å

ü

Spain

¦

Ñ

Pt

@

[

\

]

ÿ

`

{

ñ

}

¨

Switzerland

!

#

$

à

°

ç

é

^

ù

ä

ö

ü

è

Italy

!

£

$

§

°

ç

é

^

ù

à

ò

è

ì

Code Page 850 Character Table This table shows the character set that prints if your printer has Code Page 850 selected as the printer language. Note: Some Intermec printers do not support Code Page 850. For more information, see the “Printer Language, Select” command in the IPL Command Reference Manual.

80

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

!

"

22

14

15

#

$

%

&

'

(

)



+

,

-

.

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

13

16

07

08



§



▲ 21

06



17

18

09

0A



19

1A

0B



20

05

1B

0C

1C

0D

0E

0F



12





11

♦ 04



10

♥ 03



02



01



00



Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

▲ 1E

▼ 1F

➝ 1D

2F

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

:

;

<

=

>

?

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F

@ A B C D E F G H I 40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

P Q R S T U V W X Y

50

` 60

52

53

a b 62

63

51

61

p q 70

71

r 72

Ç ü é 80

81

82

c

54

58

d e f66 g67 65

68

64

74

É æ Æ ô

84

91

92

á

í

ó ú ñ

A1

A2

75

93

A3

85

94

A4

95

7E

8B

8C

8D

8E

87

F6

97

A6

A7

C4

C5

C6

D ÊD2 ËD3 ÈD4

D5

D6

ã Ã Í

Ó ß Ô Ò õ Õ μ 3 4 F3

79

å ç ê ë è

E6

C3

F2

l m n6E o6F 6D

6C

7D

C2

F1

-

7C

C1

-

5F

{

C0

F0

5E

7B

Á Â ÁB7 B5 B6

D1

5D

4F

7A

88

98

89

8A

E4

E5

E6



§

÷

F4

F5

F6

C7

Î

D7

99

}

˜

7F

Å Ä 8F

£ Ø X ƒ

9A

9B

9C

9D

® ¬ A9

AA

1/ 2 AB

1/ 4 AC

AD

B8

B9

BA

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF

C8

C9

CA

CB

CC

CD

CE

CF

D9

DA

DB

DC

DD

DE

DF

ED

EE

EF

FE

FF

Ñ a o ¿ A5

5C

4E

z

B4

E3

k

6B

\

]

x y

B3

E2

j

6A

5B

4D

78

77

B2

E1

5A

4C

D6

B1

E0

i

69

Z [

v w

B0

D0

h

59

K L M N O

4B

ö ò û ù ÿ Ö Ü ø

90

A0

u

â ä à

83

56

57

s t 73

55

J

4A

A8 ©

Ï

D8

ρ ρ Ú Û Ù y´

E7

E8

E9

EA

EB

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

1

EC

3

FC

i

9E

9F

AE

AF

¢ ¥ ¬

Ì ´ Y

2

FD

´

IPL019.eps

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

81

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Extended Character Sets Each internal printer font has a different character set as shown in the following tables. The hex codes accompany each character. Note: You must set the serial port communication to 8 data bits to use the extended character sets.

Characters in Fonts c0, c1, c2, and c7 ØØ

Ø1

Ø2

Ø3

Ø4

Ø5

Ø6

Ø7

Ø8

Ø9

ØA

ØB

ØC

ØD

ØE

ØF



11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

1A

1B

1C

1D

1E

1F



21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F



31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F



41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

4A

4B

4C

4D

4E

4F



51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

5A

5B

5C

5D

5E

5F



61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

6A

6B

6C

6D

6E

6F



71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

7A

7B

7C

7D

7E

7F



81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

8A

8B

8C

8D

8E

8F



91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

9A

9B

9C

9D

9E

9F



A1

A2

A3

A4

A5

A6

A7

A8

A9

AA

AB

AC

AD

AE

AF



B1

B2

B3

B4

B5

B6

B7

B8

B9

BA

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF



C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

C7

C8

C9

CA

CB

CC

CD

CE

CF



D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

D7

D8

D9

DA

DB

DC

DD

DE

DF



E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

E9

EA

EB

EC

ED

EE

EF



F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

FC

FD

FE

FF IPL020.eps

82

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Characters in Fonts c20, c21, and c22 ØØ



Ø2

Ø3

Ø4

Ø5

Ø6

Ø7

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

!

" # $ % & ’

Ø1

ØA

Ø8

Ø9

18

19

1A

(

)

*

ØB

1B

+

ØC

ØD

ØE

ØE

1C

1D

1E

1F

,

-

.

/



21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

:

;

<

=

>

?



31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F

@

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M N

O



41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

4A

4B

4C

4D

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W X

Y

Z

[

\

]

4E

4F

_



51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

5A

5B

5C

5D

5E

5F

`

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

m n

o

6C

6D

6E

6F

}





61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

6A

6B

p

q

r

s

t

u

v

w x

y

z

{



71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

7A

7B

7C

7D

7E

7F



81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

8A

8B

8C

8D

8E

8F



91

92

93

94

95

96

97

9A

9B

9C

9D

¡

¢

£

¤ ¥

A1

A2

A3

A4



±

2

3 B3



B1

B2

À

Á

 Ã



C1

C2

D Ñ

´ B4

Ä

A5

| |

A6

µ



B5

B6

¨

A7

A8

.

B7

Ç B8

È

A9

1

a AA

0 B9

É C9

BA

Ê

AC

AD

AE

AF

»

1 4

1 2

3 4

¿

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF

Ì

Í

Î

Ï

CC

CD

CE

CF

I

ß

Ë

×

Ø Ù

D6

D7

D8

D8

DA

DB

CB

Ú Û

D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

à

á

â

ã

ä

å

æ

ç

è

é

ê



E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

E9

o~

ñ

ò

ó

ô

õ

ö

÷

ø



F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

¬

Ö

Ò Ó Ô Õ



9F

-

AB

C8

CA

-

9E

®

«

C7

C6

C4

99

©

Å Æ Ç C5

C3

98

§

Ü Y´

DF

DC

DD

DE

ë

ì

í

î

ï

EA

EB

EC

ED

EE

EF

ù

ú

û

ü



Io

ÿ

F9

FA

FB

FC

FD

FE

FF

83

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Characters in Font c23 ØØ

Ø1

Ø2

Ø3

Ø4

Ø5

Ø6

Ø7

Ø8

Ø9

ØA

ØB

ØC

ØD

ØE

ØE



11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

1A

1B

1C

1D

1E

1F



21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F



31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F



41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

4A

4B

4C

4D

4E

4F



51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

5A

5B

5C

5D

5E

5F



61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

6A

6B

6C

6D

6E

6F



71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

7A

7B

7C

7D

7E

7F



81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

8A

8B

8C

8D

8E

8F



91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

9A

9B

9C

9D

9E

9F



A1

A2

A3

A4

A5

A6

A7

A8

A9

AA

AB

AC

AD

AE

AF



B1

B2

B3

B4

B5

B6

B7

B8

B9

BA

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF



C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

C7

C8

C9

CA

CB

CC

CD

CE

CF



D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

D7

D8

D8

DA

DB

DC

DD

DE

DF



E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

E9

EA

EB

EC

ED

EE

EF



F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

FC

FD

FE

FF IPL024.eps

84

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Characters in Font c24 ØØ

Ø1

Ø2

Ø3

Ø4

Ø5

Ø6

Ø7

Ø8

Ø9

ØA

ØB

ØC

ØD

ØE

ØE



11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

1A

1B

1C

1D

1E

1F



21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F



31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F



41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

4A

4B

4C

4D

4E

4F



51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

5A

5B

5C

5D

5E

5F



61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

6A

6B

6C

6D

6E

6F



71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

7A

7B

7C

7D

7E

7F



81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

8A

8B

8C

8D

8E

8F



91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

9A

9B

9C

9D

9E

9F



A1

A2

A3

A4

A5

A6

A7

A8

A9

AA

AB

AC

AD

AE

AF



B1

B2

B3

B4

B5

B6

B7

B8

B9

BA

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF



C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

C7

C8

C9

CA

CB

CC

CD

CE

CF



D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

D7

D8

D8

DA

DB

DC

DD

DE

DF



E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

E9

EA

EB

EC

ED

EE

EF



F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

FC

FD

FE

FF

IPL025.eps

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

85

Appendix A — Full ASCII Tables and International Character Sets

Characters in Fonts c25, c26 and c28 ØØ



Ø2

Ø3

Ø4

Ø5

Ø6

Ø7

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

!

" # $ % & ’

Ø1

Ø9

18

19

(

)

ØA

1A

*

ØB

1B

+

ØC

ØD

ØE

ØE

1C

1D

1E

1F

,

-

.

/



21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

:

;

<

=

>

?



31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

3A

3B

3C

3D

3E

3F

@ A

B

C D E

F

G H



41

42

43

44

45

46

47

P

Q R S

T

U V

I

J

K

L

M N O

48

49

4A

4B

4C

4D

4E

4F

W X

Y

Z

[

\

]

^

_



51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

5A

5B

5C

5D

5E

5F

`

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

m n

o

6C

6D

6E

6F

}

~

7D

7E



61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

6A

6B

p

q

r

s

t

u

v

w x

y

z

{



71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

7A

7B

,

ƒ

... †



82

83

85

86

87



– — ~ ™ š

95

96













” ”

91

92

93

94

¡

¢

£

¤ ¥

A3

A4

81

A1

±

A2

2

3 B3



B1

B2

À

Á

 Ã



C1

C2

D Ñ

86

Ø8

84

´ B4

Ä

A5

| |

A6

µ



B5

B6

C6

Ò Ó Ô Õ

Ö D6

C4

97

98

§

¨

A7

.

B7

A8

Ç B8

Å Æ Ç È C5

C3

ˆ ‰ Š › 88

89

99

© A9

1 B9

8A

9A

a AA

0 BA

É Ê C9

CA

8B

7C

Π8C

7F

Z 8D

8E

9E

› œ

8F

z Ÿ

9B

9C

9D

«

¬

-

®

9F

-

AB

AC

AD

AE

AF

»

1 4

1 2

3 4

¿

BB

BC

BD

BE

BF

Ì

Í

Î

Ï

CC

CD

CE

CF

Ü Y´

I

ß

DC

DD

DE

DF

Ë

C7

C8

´

Ø Ù

D7

D8

D8

DA

DB

ç

è

é

ê

ë

ì

í

î

ï

ED

EE

EF

CB

Ú Û



D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

à

á

â

ã

ä

å æ



E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

E9

EA

EB

EC

o~

ñ

ò

ó

ô

õ

ö

÷

ø

ù

ú

û

ü



Io

ÿ



F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

FC

FD

FE

FF

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

B User-Defined Interface Tables

This chapter contains the user-defined interface tables, which you may need when programming with IPL. These tables show commands in the order that you must download them when you replace the User-Defined Command/Protocol characters. A table is shown for each type of command specified by a value for “t”.

87

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Print Commands (t = 0) This list shows the Print Mode commands in the order you must download them when you are replacing the command codes. Print Commands (t = 0)

88

Default Print Command

Hex Value

Print Command Description

NUL

00

Command Terminator 1

SOH

01

Set Preamble

EOT

04

Set Postamble

ENQ

05

Status Inquiry

ACK

06

Select First Data Entry Field

BEL

07

Transmit Error Code

BS

08

Warm Boot

LF

0A

Command Terminator 2

VT

0B

Status Dump

FF

0C

Form Feed

CR

0D

Select Next Data Entry Field

SO

0E

Label Cut Command

SI

0F

Go to Shift Command Table

DLE

10

Reset

SYN

16

Set Intercharacter Delay

ETB

17

Print

CAN

18

Clear All Data

EM

19

Abort Print Job

SUB

1A

Data Shift

ESC

1B

Go to Escape Command Table

FS

1C

Numeric Field Separator

GS

1D

Alphanumeric Field Separator

RS

1E

Set Quantity Count

US

1F

Set Batch Count

DEL

7F

Clear Data From Current Field

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Escape Print Commands (t = 1) This table lists the commands in the order you must download them. Escape Print Commands (t=1) Default Escape Command

Hex Value

Escape Command Description

SYN

16

Set Message Delay

(space)

20

Enter Start/Stop Character

C

43

Select Advanced Mode

D

44

Set Field Decrement

E

45

Select Format

F

46

Select Field

G

47

Select Page

H

48

Transmit Printhead Parameters

I

49

Set Field Increment

L

4C

Transmit Label and Gap Length

M

4D

Transmit Software Version Number

N

4E

Disable Increment/Decrement

O

4F

Transmit Options Selected

P

50

Enter Program Mode

Q

51

Transmit Quantity and Batch Count

T

54

Enter Test and Service Mode

Z

5A

Transmit User-Defined Command Tables

c

63

Select 86XX Emulation Mode

d

64

Enable Auto-Transmit 2

e

65

Enable Auto-Transmit 3

g

67

Select Direct Graphics Mode

j

6A

Enable Auto-Transmit 1

k

6B

Disable Auto-Transmit 1, 2, and 3

m

6D

Transmit Static RAM Usage

p

70

Transmit Configuration Parameters

u

75

Transmit User-Defined Characters

v

76

Transmit Font

x

78

Transmit Format

y

79

Transmit Page

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

89

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Shift Print Commands (t = 2) This list shows the Shift commands in the order you must download them. You must precede these commands with the “Go to Shift Command Table” command (default value SI) listed in the Print Commands (t = 0) table on page 88. Shift Print Commands (t = 2)

90

Default Shift Command

Hex Value

Shift Command Description

A

41

Control Panel Access

C

43

86XX or Advanced Mode on PowerUp

D

44

Set End-of-Print Skip Distance

F

46

Set Top of Form

H

48

Set Printhead Pressure

I

49

Set Number of Image Bands

L

4C

Set Maximum Label Length

N

4E

Define Amount of Storage

O

4F

Online or Offline on Power-Up

R

52

Enable or Disable Label Retract

S

53

Set Print Speed

T

54

Select Label Stock Type

U

55

Set Printhead Test Parameters

W

57

Set Label Width

Z

5A

Set Ribbon Save Zone

a

61

Audible Alarm

b

62

Increase Takeup Motor Torque

c

63

Enable or Disable Cutter

d

64

Set Dark Adjust

f

66

Adjust Label Rest Point

g

67

Select TTR or Direct Thermal

h

68

Select Printhead Loading Mode

i

69

IBM Language Translation

l

6C

Select Printer Language

p

70

Set Pin 11/20 Protocol

r

72

Set Label Retract Distance

t

74

Enable or Disable Self-Strip

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Status Responses and Auto-Transmit Commands (t = 3) This list contains the status responses and auto-transmit commands in the order you must download them. Status Responses and Auto-Transmit Commands (t = 3) Status Command

Hex Value

Status Description

GS

1D

Buffer Already Full

SO

0E

Printhead Test Fail

US

1F

Label Path Open

US

1F

Ribbon Fault

EM

19

No Label Stock

DC3

13

Buffer Now Full

EOT

04

RFID Tag Write Error

VT

01

RFID Tag Read Error

BS

08

Takeup Reel Full

SI*

0F

Printhead Hot

FS

1C

Label at Strip Pin

ACK

06

RFID Tag Write Ok

DC1**

11

Skipping

DC1**

11

Printing

DC1**

11

Ready

DC1 Auto-Transmit 1**

11

Clear

FS Auto-Transmit 1

1C

Label at Strip Pin

BS Auto-Transmit 1

08

Takeup Reel Full

EM Auto-Transmit 1

19

No Label Stock

US Auto-Transmit 1

1F

Ribbon Fault

DC1 Auto-Transmit 2

11

Room in Buffer

HT Auto-Transmit 3

09

Imager Overrun

SOH Auto-Transmit 3

01

Print Job Complete and Buffer Empty

RS Auto-Transmit 3

1E

Insufficient RAM

*Some older Intermec printers may not support this entry. **The status responses in the above table are for standard protocol. In XON/XOFF protocol, most of the status responses are the same; however, instead of DC1, the status response is DC2, and instead of DC2, the status response is DC4. See your printer user’s manual for more information about protocols and status responses.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

91

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Protocol Commands (t = 4) This list contains the protocol codes in the order you must download them. Protocol Commands (t = 4)

92

Command Characters

Hex Value

Command Description

GS

1D

SELECT IN

FS

1C

POLL IN

EOT

04

RES IN

ENQ

05

REQ IN

STX

02

SOM IN

ETX

03

EOM IN

ACK

06

AFF IN

NAK

15

NEG IN

DLE

10

DLE IN

DC1

11

XON IN

DC3

13

XOFF IN

GS

1D

SELECT OUT

FS

1C

POLL OUT

EOT

04

RES OUT

ENQ

05

REQ OUT

STX

02

SOM OUT

ETX

03

EOM OUT

ACK

06

AFF OUT

NAK

15

NEG OUT

DLE

10

DLE OUT

DC1

11

XON OUT

DC3

13

XOFF OUT

ENQ

05

Proto-Cmd 1

VT

0B

Proto-Cmd 2

20 (ms) (Range: 0 - 255)

14

Timeout on EOM ACK

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

Communications Protocol Characters This table shows the characters available for different protocols. Refer to the protocol you are using for your system. Communications Protocol Characters Protocol Characters

Standard

XON/XOFF

Polling Mode D

Multi-Drop

Select In

GS

GS

Poll In

FS

FS

Reset In

EOT

EOT

Request for Acknowledgment In

ENQ

ENQ

Start of Message In

STX

STX

STX

STX

End of Message In

ETX

ETX

ETX

ETX

Acknowledgment In

ACK

ACK

Negative Acknowledgment In

NAK

NAK

DLE

DLE

Data Line Escape In

DLE

DLE

XON In

DC1

XOFF In

DC3

Select Out

GS

Poll Out

FS

Reset Out

EOT

EOT

Request for Acknowledgment Out

ENQ

ENQ

Start of Message Out

STX

STX

End of Message Out

ETX

ETX

Acknowledgment Out

ACK

ACK

NAK

NAK

DLE

DLE

DC4

DC4

Negative Acknowledgment Out

NAK

Data Line Escape Out

DLE

DLE

XON Out

DC1

XOFF Out

DC3

Status Enquiry In

ENQ

ENQ

Status Dump In

VT

VT

Timeout on EOM ACK

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

93

Appendix B — User-Defined Interface Tables

94

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

I Index

95

Index

Symbols

, defined, 4 , defined, 3 Numerics

86XX Emulation mode IPL commands supported, 59 using, 59 86XX-compatible Code 39, 73 A

advanced character table, 79 ASCII control codes, using, 4 table of character equivalents, 76 table of control characters, 78 text file, creating from IPL commands, 5 Asian fonts, 42–43 installing code page tables, 42 RAM requirements for bitmap, 43 auto-transmit commands, downloading order, 91 B

bar code fields, 11 bitmap data, in run-length encoding, 65 bitmap fonts described, 38 downloading with IPL commands, 40 downloading with PrintSet, 39 generating from TrueType, 41, 44 box fields, 12 C

changing operating modes, 6 character tables advanced, 79 Code Page 850, 80 extended, 82 IBM translation, 80 international, 79 Code 39 equivalents, for ASCII characters, 76 Code Page 850 character table, 80 code pages installing, 42 tables, list of, 79 where to find, 42 codes, error, 71 command strings, 3 ASCII control codes or characters, 4 examples, 5 sample label format, 24

96

saving as text file, 5 sending text file to printer, 5 command terminator character, 4 commands. See IPL commands communication protocol characters, 93 communications commands, described, 2 configuration commands, described, 2 control characters table of full ASCII, 78 using, 4 control codes, 4 creating bitmap fonts from TrueType, 44 one bit per byte user-defined graphics, 45 six bits per byte user-defined fonts, 53 six bits per byte user-defined graphics, 48 user-defined bitmap graphics, 44 D

data, specifying for fields, 18–21 changing, example, 19 defaults for field 0, 12 deleting fields, 15 description of IPL commands, 2 designing label formats, example, 22 pages, 68 determining print position of a field, 15 Direct Graphics mode, 64 commands, using, 66 example, 66 dots per mm by printhead size, 16 downloading code pages, 42 commands, interface tables, 88–93 fonts using IPL commands, 40 with PrintSet, 39 graphics one bit per byte, 45 six bits per byte, 48 IPL commands, 5–6 user-defined fonts, for Emulation mode, 47 E

editing fields, 12 Emulation mode, 59 commands supported, 59–63 described, 59–63

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Index

IPL commands supported, 59 Legacy mode, for 86XX-compatible Code 39, 73 user-defined fonts, 47 using, 59 end of text character, 4 error codes, listed, 71 conditions, handling, 70 handling, printer, 70 image overrun, 70 insufficient storage memory, 71 invalid numeric character, 71 parameter, 70 syntax, 70 escape print commands, 89 examples ASCII control codes, in command string, 4 bar code label, illustrated, 10 changing data in label format, 19 complex labels, 28 Direct Graphics mode, 66 graphics, using, 30 line and box fields, using, 28 Next Data Entry Field, in label format, 20 RFID tag, 33 rotated fields, using, 30 sample label format, 22 simple command string, 3 extended character sets, 82 F

field 0, working with, 12–13 fields bar code, defined, 11 box, defined, 12 data, specifying, 18–21 deleting, 15 editing, 14 graphic, defined, 12 height, change magnification, 17 human-readable, defined, 11 interpretive fields, defined, 13 line, defined, 12 magnifying, 17 numbering, 13 origin, locating, 15, 23 positioning, 15 rotating, 16 scaling, 17 types, defined, 10–12 user-defined character, defined, 12 width, change magnification, 17

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

working with fields, 12 flash memory. See memory fonts bitmap, described, 38 choosing type to use, 38 compared, 39 downloading, 39–41 using PrintSet, 39 downloading with IPL commands, 40 downloading with PrintSet, 39 generating bitmap from TrueType, 41, 44 licensing, 43 magnifying, 17 memory needed, 41 one bit per byte, creating, 47 outline, described, 38 RAM requirements, 41 six bits per byte, creating, 53 TrueDoc, 38 TrueType, 41 user-defined, for Advanced mode, 53 user-defined, for Emulation mode, 47 formats. See label formats full ASCII control characters table, 78 table of characters, 76 G

graphic fields, 12 graphics one bit per byte, for Emulation mode, 45 six bits per byte, downloading, 48 six bits per byte, for Advanced mode, 48 user-defined characters and fonts, 44 H

high order data, in run-length encoding, 65 human-readable fields, 11 I

IBM translation character table, 80 image overrun errors, 70 immediate commands, described, 3 installing code page tables, 42 Intermec Printer Language. See IPL commands international character sets, hex codes, 79 interpreting error codes, 71

97

Index

interpretive fields, 13 invalid numeric character errors, 71 IPL commands ASCII control characters, using, 4 basic procedure, 3 sending to printer, 5 structure, described, 3 types, 2 using to download fonts, 40 using to program printers, 3 J

Japanese Shift-JIS font, 42 K

Korean KSC-5601 font, 42 L

label formats command description, 31, 34 creating with IPL, 24 defined, 10 deleting fields, 15 editing, 12 editing fields, 14 example, 28, 30, 33 fields, numbering, 13 how to print, 3 origin of field, locating, 23 pages, designing, 68 positioning fields, 15 programming with IPL, 24 rotating fields, 16 sample, 22 using, 10 languages international character sets, 79 selecting on printer, 41 Legacy Emulation mode, 73 licensing fonts, 43 line fields, 12 low order data, in run-length encoding, 65 M

magnifying bar code fields, 18 character fields and fonts, 17 magnifying fields, 17 memory errors, 71 for TrueType fonts, 41 increasing amount available, 58 using efficiently, 58 Multi-Drop protocol, characters available, 93

98

N

Next Data Entry Field, Select command, using, 20 numeric character errors, invalid, 71 O

one bit per byte fonts, creating, 47 one bit per byte graphics, creating, 45 operating modes for printers, 6 operating modes, changing, 6 origin of field described, 15 locating, 23 outline fonts Asian, 42 described, 38 downloading using IPL commands, 40 using PrintSet, 39 example, nibblized file, 40 printer compatibility, 38 TrueType support, 41 P

pages, designing, 68 parameter errors, 70 Polling Mode D protocol, characters available, 93 positioning fields, 15 print commands, described, 2 Print mode commands, download order, 88 entering, 6, 7 printers bitmap fonts, internal, 11 Emulation mode, 59 error conditions, 70 error handling, 70 memory, using efficiently, 58 operating modes, 6 outline fonts, compatibility, 38 printhead size, dots per mm, 16 programming, 3 RAM requirements, for fonts, 41 RAM, understanding, 58 selecting language, 41 storage memory, described, 58 troubleshooting, 70 printhead size, dots per mm, 16 PrintSet, using to download fonts, 39 problems and solutions, 70–73 program commands, described, 2 Program mode, entering, 6 programming printers, described, 3 protocol commands, downloading, 92 protocols, characters available, 93

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Index

R

RAM increasing available, 58 requirements for fonts, 41 using efficiently, 58 reimaging modified fields, 59 RFID storing data on tags, 22 ASCII format, 22 Hex format, 22 numerical format, 22 working with tags, 21 writing data to tags, 21 RLE. See run-length encoding rotating fields, 16 run-length encoding, 64–65 S

scaling fields, 17 selecting the printer language, 41 sending IPL commands to the printer, 5 service commands, described, 3 shift print commands, 90 Simplified Chinese font, 42 six bits per byte format, for characters, 48 six bits per byte format, for fonts, 53 sizing fields, 17 specifying data for fields changing, example, 19 how to, 18, 20 standard protocol, characters available, 93 start of text character, 3 static RAM. See RAM status responses, downloading order, 91

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

storage memory. See memory switching printer operating modes, 6 syntax errors, 70 T

test and service commands, described, 3 Test and Service mode, entering, 6, 7 Traditional Chinese font, 42 troubleshooting, 70 TrueDoc fonts, printer compatibility, 38 TrueType fonts code pages, installing, 42 licensing, 43 memory required, 41 printer language, choosing, 41 U

UDC, defined, 44 UDF, defined, 44 user-defined character fields, 12 user-defined characters Advanced mode, 48 creating, 44 Emulation mode, 45 one bit per byte, 45 six bits per byte, 48 user-defined fonts Advanced mode, 53 creating, 44 Emulation mode, 47 one bit per byte format, 47 six bits per byte format, 53 X

XON/XOFF protocol, characters available, 93

99

Index

100

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

Worldwide Headquarters 6001 36th Avenue West Everett, Washington 98203 U.S.A. tel 425.348.2600 fax 425.355.9551 www.intermec.com © 2009 Intermec Technologies Corporation. All rights reserved.

Intermec Printer Language (IPL) Developer’s Guide

*934-013-003* P/N 934-013-003

Loading...

Developer's Guide - Honeywell AIDC

IPL Intermec Printer Language Developer’s Guide Intermec Technologies Corporation Worldwide Headquarters 6001 36th Ave.W. Everett, WA 98203 U.S.A...

3MB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

microFlash® 4t - Honeywell AIDC
Red. - The battery has less than 5% power. Rojo. - la batería tiene menos del 5% de energía. Rood. - Het batterijvermo

DMXrfNet III and DMXNet III Card Option - Honeywell AIDC
Only qualified service personnel should install this Option. ... when there is data transmitted between the printer and

70 Series Mobile Computer User Manual - Honeywell AIDC
Dec 16, 2001 - 70 Series Mobile Computer User Manual. Intermec by Honeywell. 6001 36th Ave.W. Everett, WA 98203. U.S.A.

JavaScript Developers Guide | Parse
Queries. We've already seen how a Parse.Query with get can retrieve a single Parse.Object from Parse. There are many oth

An Essential Guide for Developers
unacceptable levels of soil pollution or land instability; and remediating and mitigating ... All investigations should

Shipping Package XML Developers Guide
Jul 9, 2012 - Once you register to use UPS Developer API, UPS will notify you by e-mail of updates and changes to the De

Honeywell Pro-Watch - Honeywell Security
Existing Pro-Watch Corporate. Edition system can be easily integrated into an Enterprise without loss of data or history

Honeywell L3000 Programming Guide - Alarm Grid
Oct 21, 2012 - Then enter 1 for loop 1 when on field E. Then hit * until you see '1C' on the keypad. ... Key fob program

HMIWeb Display Building Guide - Honeywell Process Solutions
Records 2881 - 3880 - “CrossScreenInvocationPending method ” on page 388. “DisplayExists method” on page 389. â€

NX4L1 Installation Guide - Honeywell Access Control
WARNING. Fire Safety and Liability Notice: Never connect card readers to any critical entry, exit door, barrier, elevato